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NEWS
February 22, 2006
Joseph Henry Miller, a retired Sears, Roebuck and Co. executive who worked with his son-in-law in establishing an automotive undercoating business, died of cardiovascular disease Feb. 15 at Stella Maris Hospice. He was 94. A resident of the Mercy Ridge Retirement Community in Timonium, he formerly made his home in Towson. Born and raised in Braddock, Pa., he became an accountant for Sears stores and held positions in Philadelphia, Scranton, Pa., and Buffalo, N.Y., before being assigned to a old store at North Avenue and Harford Road in Baltimore as assistant manager.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2010
Henry Miller "Hank" Worthington, a retired hardware executive and music lover who enjoyed waterfowl hunting, died Monday of complications from dementia at his Garrison home. He was 80. Mr. Worthington, the son of a hardware executive and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Forest Park and Garrison. He was a 1948 graduate of Gilman School and attended Princeton University, where he played ice hockey and was captain of the skeet shooting team. "He was an expert marksman, a skill inherited from his father, a 13-time Maryland state skeet and trap champion," said a son, Edward H. "Ned" Worthington of Garrison.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 16, 1999
Henry Miller, a retired stockbroker, portrait painter and businessman, died Saturday of congestive heart failure at Sinai Hospital. He was 90 and lived in Lochearn.Mr. Miller cut a distinctive figure in Baltimore in the 1930s and 1940s. He often sported a flamboyant beard and mustache, which turned heads on the city's streets, according to a 1941 article in The Sun.He included paintings of his whiskers in a one-man show of portraits at the Baltimore Museum of Art in 1941, and they were a trademark throughout his life.
NEWS
February 22, 2006
Joseph Henry Miller, a retired Sears, Roebuck and Co. executive who worked with his son-in-law in establishing an automotive undercoating business, died of cardiovascular disease Feb. 15 at Stella Maris Hospice. He was 94. A resident of the Mercy Ridge Retirement Community in Timonium, he formerly made his home in Towson. Born and raised in Braddock, Pa., he became an accountant for Sears stores and held positions in Philadelphia, Scranton, Pa., and Buffalo, N.Y., before being assigned to a old store at North Avenue and Harford Road in Baltimore as assistant manager.
FEATURES
By SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER | June 26, 1997
SAN FRANCISCO -- The life of Henry Miller, author, pornographer, celebrated lover -- including a first draft of his "Tropic of Capricorn" -- is up for sale."
FEATURES
By STEVE MCKERROW | August 17, 1991
There are not many occasions when the word "literary" can be applied accurately and affectionately to television programming. But what a nice exception is the HBO Showcase series "Women & Men 2," premiering on the premium cable network at 9 p.m. tomorrow.In part that is because the trilogy of half-hour set pieces has been drawn from short stories by Irwin Shaw, Carson McCullers and Henry Miller.But more than that, this second edition of the series (the first was seen a year ago) has the texture of a "good read," with meticulous attention to background detail and an involving theme that draws the viewer into intimacy with the characters.
NEWS
By Chris Kridler | March 12, 1995
For those captivated by Anais Nin's persona, her fiction, her erotica or her diaries - or for those who love to hate her - one aspect of her endures beyond her death: her mystery. Or, more accurately, her lies.She remained an enigma even to herself, despite a lifetime of analysis, as biographer Deirdre Bair makes clear in "Anais Nin: A Biography." A "major minor writer," as Ms. Bair describes her, Nin showed the world only what she most wanted it to see, especially in the works that established her reputation: her diaries.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2002
John Henry Miller, a former restaurateur who founded a stained-glass business, died of heart failure Feb. 8 at a hospital in Billings, Mont. He was 88 and lived in Kingsville for nearly half a century before moving to Cheyenne, Wyo., 15 years ago. A member of the family that founded the now-defunct Miller Brothers Restaurant in downtown Baltimore, he managed the Kingsville Inn on Belair Road from 1950 to 1962, and owned Perry House in the Perry Hall...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | October 5, 1990
Henry Miller was like Yeats' rough beast slouching toward Bethlehem to be born, except that he had to slouch to Paris to be published.But published he was, perhaps an inevitable figure, but a necessary one: He got sex -- or, rather, the sex act -- into the American novel, in all its sweaty, wet, seething glory. He was to sex as James Jones was to war: a terrible writer whose vision and guts far outclassed his talent. Oh brother, did it ever.As he was obsessed with literature and sex, he was obsessed with their natural union -- that is, a woman: his wife, June Smith, a dance hall girl he met in 1923.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | November 8, 1993
A column in yesterday's business section referred incorrectly to furniture maker Herman Miller Inc. as Henry Miller Inc.The Sun regrets the errors.Several times a month, a professional book comes across my desk, sent by publishers on the odd chance that I may have enough time for a thoughtful review.Most are outstandingly unimpressive, in my opinion. They rehash old management concepts, or brazenly hawk some "new" fund-raising concepts that have been used successfully by practitioners for decades.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2002
John Henry Miller, a former restaurateur who founded a stained-glass business, died of heart failure Feb. 8 at a hospital in Billings, Mont. He was 88 and lived in Kingsville for nearly half a century before moving to Cheyenne, Wyo., 15 years ago. A member of the family that founded the now-defunct Miller Brothers Restaurant in downtown Baltimore, he managed the Kingsville Inn on Belair Road from 1950 to 1962, and owned Perry House in the Perry Hall...
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 16, 1999
Henry Miller, a retired stockbroker, portrait painter and businessman, died Saturday of congestive heart failure at Sinai Hospital. He was 90 and lived in Lochearn.Mr. Miller cut a distinctive figure in Baltimore in the 1930s and 1940s. He often sported a flamboyant beard and mustache, which turned heads on the city's streets, according to a 1941 article in The Sun.He included paintings of his whiskers in a one-man show of portraits at the Baltimore Museum of Art in 1941, and they were a trademark throughout his life.
FEATURES
By SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER | June 26, 1997
SAN FRANCISCO -- The life of Henry Miller, author, pornographer, celebrated lover -- including a first draft of his "Tropic of Capricorn" -- is up for sale."
NEWS
By Chris Kridler | March 12, 1995
For those captivated by Anais Nin's persona, her fiction, her erotica or her diaries - or for those who love to hate her - one aspect of her endures beyond her death: her mystery. Or, more accurately, her lies.She remained an enigma even to herself, despite a lifetime of analysis, as biographer Deirdre Bair makes clear in "Anais Nin: A Biography." A "major minor writer," as Ms. Bair describes her, Nin showed the world only what she most wanted it to see, especially in the works that established her reputation: her diaries.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | November 8, 1993
A column in yesterday's business section referred incorrectly to furniture maker Herman Miller Inc. as Henry Miller Inc.The Sun regrets the errors.Several times a month, a professional book comes across my desk, sent by publishers on the odd chance that I may have enough time for a thoughtful review.Most are outstandingly unimpressive, in my opinion. They rehash old management concepts, or brazenly hawk some "new" fund-raising concepts that have been used successfully by practitioners for decades.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | October 22, 1992
ST. MARY'S CITY -- Crowded around color TV monitors, scientists watched in wonder yesterday as a tiny fiberoptic camera led them on a jerky tour of the inside of a child-sized lead coffin buried here 300 years ago.The circular color image showed fine, root-like tendrils hanging from the coffin's lead roof; a jumble of rotted material, perhaps from a wooden inner coffin; piles of brown mud washed in by groundwater, and what appeared to some to be part of...
NEWS
May 12, 1992
Intricate plans are being made for the excavation and opening of three lead coffins believed to hold the remains of Maryland's founding Calvert family, said Dr. Henry Miller, director of research for Historic St. Mary's City.After archaeologists uncover the upper ends of the three coffins -- the same portions exposed in December 1990 -- Mark Moore of the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute in Bethesda will use gamma-ray imaging to peer through the lead and locate bones, nails and wood inside.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | October 22, 1992
ST. MARY'S CITY -- Crowded around color TV monitors, scientists watched in wonder yesterday as a tiny fiberoptic camera led them on a jerky tour of the inside of a child-sized lead coffin buried here 300 years ago.The circular color image showed fine, root-like tendrils hanging from the coffin's lead roof; a jumble of rotted material, perhaps from a wooden inner coffin; piles of brown mud washed in by groundwater, and what appeared to some to be part of...
FEATURES
By Caroline Spencer and Caroline Spencer,Contributing Writer | September 27, 1992
This is the California that men dreamed of years ago, this is the Pacific that Balboa looked out on from the Peak of Darien, this is the face of the earth as the Creator intended it to look.Henry Miller"Big Sur and the Orange of Hieronymous Bosch" Arugged, raw wilderness perched on rocky cliffs ringing an untamed Pacific Ocean, California's Central Coast for years has served as a haven for artists, writers and scientists. It has inspired accomplished Americans such as newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst, author Henry Miller and two-time Nobel Peace Prize recipient Dr. Linus Pauling.
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