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NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
More than two dozen West Baltimore homeowners are suing the state of Maryland to block the planned Red Line transit project from tunneling beneath their block, contending that they were inappropriately left out of the planning process. They seek more than $22 million in damages for lost property value and emotional distress. "Right now, they've lost so much of the value of their homes," said Lewyn Scott Garrett, one of three attorneys representing the 25 homeowners in the 300 block of N. Fremont Ave. in the city's Poppleton neighborhood.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
More than two dozen West Baltimore homeowners are suing the state of Maryland to block the planned Red Line transit project from tunneling beneath their block, contending that they were inappropriately left out of the planning process. They seek more than $22 million in damages for lost property value and emotional distress. "Right now, they've lost so much of the value of their homes," said Lewyn Scott Garrett, one of three attorneys representing the 25 homeowners in the 300 block of N. Fremont Ave. in the city's Poppleton neighborhood.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
State officials' assessment of the environmental impacts of the proposed Purple Line through suburban Washington satisfies federal environmental standards, the Federal Transit Administration announced this week — an important green light for the project to proceed. The federal clearance is required for federal funding to be spent on the project, as planned, and gives state officials more confidence to begin the long task of acquiring land in the proposed transit line's right-of-way, officials said.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Baltimore city and county leaders announced Tuesday that they are committing a combined $280 million to fund construction of the Red Line light rail even as the estimated cost for the project has ballooned to $2.9 billion. The local contributions are considered critical for the Woodlawn-to-East Baltimore transit line to proceed. As federal transportation funding has dwindled in recent years, officials prioritizing infrastructure improvements around the country have favored projects that include state and local cost sharing.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
The Federal Transit Administration has given its blessing to the environmental impact assessment for Baltimore's proposed Red Line, clearing the way for final design but adding new urgency to finding the means to pay for the $2.5 billion light rail project. In a decision released Tuesday afternoon, the FTA said the Maryland Transit Administration had satisfied all environmental requirements laid out in the federal law. "This is a milestone," said Henry Kay, the MTA's executive director for transit development and delivery.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Baltimore city and county leaders announced Tuesday that they are committing a combined $280 million to fund construction of the Red Line light rail even as the estimated cost for the project has ballooned to $2.9 billion. The local contributions are considered critical for the Woodlawn-to-East Baltimore transit line to proceed. As federal transportation funding has dwindled in recent years, officials prioritizing infrastructure improvements around the country have favored projects that include state and local cost sharing.
NEWS
March 14, 2007
The Baltimore Architecture Foundation's Spring Forum begins at noon today with a free lecture featuring Station North developers, including Jubilee Baltimore Inc.'s Charlie Duff. The public is invited to take a lunch to the Berman Auditorium of the Johns Hopkins Downtown Center, at Charles and Fayette streets. Future sessions will include: March 21: Ed Rutkowski, Patterson Park Community Development Corp.'s executive director, will discuss the corporation's role in Baltimore. March 28: Representatives from the Baltimore City Historical Society, Baltimore Architecture Foundation and Baltimore Heritage will discuss plans to renovate the Peale Museum and reopen it as the Baltimore City History Center.
NEWS
February 14, 2006
Sometimes, the facts count. Take the Greater Baltimore Committee's report last year on transit spending. The GBC's analysis showed the Ehrlich administration planned to spend modestly to keep Baltimore's network of buses and rail lines in working order over the next six years. The budget proposed setting aside as little as $5 million annually for maintenance, or about one-fourteenth of what the Maryland Transit Administration is spending this year. Maryland Transportation Secretary Robert L. Flanagan initially claimed the GBC report was alarmist.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2005
Focusing development around rail and bus stops could help revitalize blighted neighborhoods in Baltimore while also easing the region's traffic congestion, said a report released yesterday. But state and local officials need to do more to overcome obstacles that have slowed such transit-oriented development, according to the report by the MaryPIRG Foundation. "These stations have tremendous potential for development, but it depends on coordination between state and city agencies," MaryPIRG's Chris Fick said during a news conference held at a MARC commuter stop in West Baltimore.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
The estimated costs for the Red and Purple transit lines in Baltimore and suburban Washington increased in recent years, an analysis released Wednesday by the Federal Transit Administration showed. The Red Line, which would cut west-to-east across and at times under Baltimore, now is estimated to cost $2.644 billion, $70 million more than a November 2012 estimate, primarily due to "increased construction costs for underground stations and for the heavy maintenance facility," according to the report.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
State officials' assessment of the environmental impacts of the proposed Purple Line through suburban Washington satisfies federal environmental standards, the Federal Transit Administration announced this week — an important green light for the project to proceed. The federal clearance is required for federal funding to be spent on the project, as planned, and gives state officials more confidence to begin the long task of acquiring land in the proposed transit line's right-of-way, officials said.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
The Federal Transit Administration has given its blessing to the environmental impact assessment for Baltimore's proposed Red Line, clearing the way for final design but adding new urgency to finding the means to pay for the $2.5 billion light rail project. In a decision released Tuesday afternoon, the FTA said the Maryland Transit Administration had satisfied all environmental requirements laid out in the federal law. "This is a milestone," said Henry Kay, the MTA's executive director for transit development and delivery.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN REPORTER | October 1, 2006
As Harford County plans for the growth that will result from the nationwide military base realignment, officials should put more emphasis on improving rail and bus lines to meet demand, according to a transportation advocacy group. Early planning has focused much attention on improving roads for the thousands of residents coming to Aberdeen Proving Ground in Harford and Fort Meade in Anne Arundel County as a result of the realignment process known as BRAC, according to the Baltimore Transit Alliance, a subsidiary of the Greater Baltimore Committee.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | August 5, 2009
Cheers from political and business leaders and jeers from neighborhood activists greeted Gov. Martin O'Malley's announcement Tuesday that he will seek federal funding for a 14-mile light rail system with limited tunneling as Maryland's plan to build the long-awaited east-west Red Line. During an appearance at West Baltimore's MARC station, O'Malley surprised nobody by selecting the plan that has won the endorsement of Mayor Sheila Dixon, Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. and the Greater Baltimore Committee.
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