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March 14, 2004
On March 11, 2004 Henry James Roehner Jr. of Brooklyn Park, devoted father of Henry James Roehner 3rd. Loving grandfather of Henry James Roehner 4th and Renee Brinkerhoff. Loving great grandfather of Kiersten Brinkerhoff. Friends may call at the family owned Kirkley-Ruddick Funeral Home P.A., 421 Crain Highway S.E. Glen Burnie on Sunday 3-5 & 7-9 P.M. Services will be held on Monday at 10:00 AM. Interment in Crownsville MD Veterans Cemetery. INE SALAMONE (nee Grimaldi); beloved wife of the late Aurelio W. Salamone; beloved sister of Mary Josephine Falter.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2013
Two Baltimore City Councilmen are formally calling on the state of Maryland to cover the costs of erroneous historic property tax credits that have cut revenue to the city over the past several years. Councilmen Bill Henry, who represents north Baltimore, and James Kraft, who represents southeast Baltimore, plan to introduce a resolution Monday that will call on the state to "find an appropriate mechanism whereby the city of Baltimore can be compensated for lost property tax revenue, so as not to negatively impact blameless homeowners and not unduly burden the city's finances because of flawed calculations used by the state.
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NEWS
By Laura Demanski and Laura Demanski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 20, 1996
"Henry James: The Young Master," by Sheldon Novick. Random House. 560 pages $35Now that Jane Austen has been virtually exhausted as screenplay plunder, moviemakers are turning to the virtually inexhaustible works of Henry James. Upcoming films of "The Portrait of a Lady," and "The Wings of the Dove," promise to reanimate for our time the classic Jamesian plot of the American in Europe. Eighty years after the expatriate novelist died in England, and fifty years after he was established as master American writer, we are about to start talking about Henry James again.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2013
For the next week and a little more the lights will be out at Wordville as the mayor takes a little time off, to sit on his ass and read books, mark the setting of the sun with the benison of bourbon, and maybe even try one more time to like Henry James. During this interval you are welcome to consult that lovely man Stan Carey at Sentence First for his always thoughtful explorations of language. Or Jonathon Owen's post at Arrant Pedantry about his master's thesis on the role of editors in standardizing English usage, which I have been either to rushed or too lazy to tell you about.
NEWS
October 20, 1996
Henry James' father was a prominent intellectual and young Henry was surrounded by Thoreau, Emerson and Hawthorne in his youth.James' work, now considered among the best, often pondered on the theme of a foreigner trying to fit in, a concept he was exposed to early and often in his life.Because his father was apt to travel on a whim, the younger James, who was born in New York City, lived in London, Geneva Paris, Bologna, Bonn and Newport, Rhode Island, before the age of 17. After a year-long stint at Harvard Law School, he turned to writing with his first short story, "A Tragedy of Error."
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | June 13, 1995
Henry James was one of the most respected writers of his day, but there was no fanfare when he stepped off a train at Baltimore's old Union Station 90 years ago.In the Baltimore of 1905, horse-drawn taxis waited at the railway depot's Charles Street side. The 62-year-old American novelist's next destination was the recently completed Belvedere Hotel at Charles and Chase streets."I arrived late in the day, and the day had been lovely; I alighted at a large fresh peaceful hostelry, imposingly modern yet quietly affable, and, having recognized the deep, soft general note, even from my windows, as that of a kind of mollified vivacity, I sought the streets with as many tacit questions as I judged they would tolerate, or as the waning day would allow me to put," James wrote in the chapter devoted to Baltimore in his 1907 journal of his East Coast impressions, "The American Scene."
NEWS
By Eve Ottenberg Stone | November 22, 1992
HENRY JAMES:THE IMAGINATION OF GENIUS.Fred Kaplan.Morrow.620 pages. $25.It is always nice to have a second chance to look at the life of a great writer, but after the publication of Leon Edel's definitive and encyclopedic biography of Henry James, it did not seem that such a chance would be forthcoming in the near future (his biography was five volumes, published over 18 years). Fred Kaplan's new study has contradicted that expectation, however. With its analysis of James' oeuvre, piece by piece, and of the homoerotic nature of some of James' friendships, it provides an interesting, if not always convincing portrait of the master.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 1, 2001
For decades, the producing-directing team of Ismail Merchant and James Ivory has been denigrated for plush and cautious "Masterpiece Theatre" moviemaking. After comparing their production of Henry James' "The Golden Bowl" to the 1972 BBC production that appeared on "Masterpiece Theatre," I consider any such comparison an insult - to "Masterpiece Theatre." The Merchant-Ivory "Golden Bowl" takes a literary milestone of ambiguity and makes everything about it blisteringly obvious. The "Masterpiece Theatre" version, written by Jack Pulman - the same adapting genius who dramatized "I, Claudius" for the BBC - slyly and wisely pulls you into a tissue of evasion, half-truth and elegant prevarication.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 17, 1997
"Washington Square," Agnieszka Holland's adaptation of the Henry James novel, starts out with a long, lovely crane shot that sends a tip-toeing camera from a jewel-like park, through a townhouse window, up a narrow staircase and into a bedchamber. It's an exhilarating beginning, but one that belies what is to come, which is a series of stale, static scenes that capture the details of 19th-century life but endow the characters with about as much energy as wax fruit.This lavishly appointed, well-upholstered and largely lifeless production suffers from that all-too-common ailment of films with earnest aspirations.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2012
After I ruminated earlier today about the relationship between writers and editors , coming down rather heavily on the side of the latter, Frank Moorman posted a comment on Facebook that pointed me to a contrary view, one too good not to share.  As recounted by Neel Mukherjee , the editor of the Times Literary Supplement  cut a sentence and a half from a 5,000-word Henry James review to make it fit. James returned the proofs, writing,...
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2013
One of the pedantic little flourishes copy editors can fall into is distorting the Associated Press Stylebook guideline that says "Avoid the use of last as a synonym for latest if it might imply finality. " Magnifying a guideline into a rule, some copy editors will reflexively change "for the last week" into "for the past week," "for the last month" into "for the past month," as if Harold Camping had whispered to them that the Apocalypse was arriving momentarily and there was no need for those additional pages on the calendar.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2012
After I ruminated earlier today about the relationship between writers and editors , coming down rather heavily on the side of the latter, Frank Moorman posted a comment on Facebook that pointed me to a contrary view, one too good not to share.  As recounted by Neel Mukherjee , the editor of the Times Literary Supplement  cut a sentence and a half from a 5,000-word Henry James review to make it fit. James returned the proofs, writing,...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2012
Rosa C. James, a retired mortician who enjoyed world travel, died of cancer March 5 at her Northwest Baltimore home. She was 80 but told friends she was "always 37. " Born Rosa Mae Cade in Lumberton, N.C., she came to Baltimore as a child. She was a 1950 Frederick Douglass High School graduate, where she was voted "Miss Douglass. " As a young woman, she worked as a secretary at Lasting Products, a paint firm, and at what is now Morgan State University. She also worked for the Maryland Commission on Interracial Problems and Relations.
NEWS
May 11, 2007
Elizabeth N. James, a homemaker and mother of 15 who was known for her pies and cakes, died in her sleep May 1 at her Northeast Baltimore home. She was 93. Elizabeth N. Tyler was born in St. Mary's County and moved with her family to Baltimore, where she graduated from Dunbar High School. She was married in 1930 to Edward James, a longshoreman who died in 1971. Mrs. James lived for 60 years in the 1900 block of E. Chase St., until being uprooted by urban renewal and moving to Omaha Avenue in 2004.
NEWS
December 27, 2005
Henry James Hyde Jr., 55, the eldest son Henry James Hyde Jr., 55, the eldest son of retiring Rep. Henry J. Hyde and a former minor league baseball player, died Saturday after a battle with liver cancer. Mr. Hyde died at an Elk Grove Village, Ill., hospice center, said Representative Hyde's spokesman, Sam Stratman. After his first year at Loyola University in New Orleans, Mr. Hyde was drafted by the Pittsburgh Pirates organization and played for the Niagara Falls Pirates. In 1973, he was signed by the Atlanta Braves as a free agent and pitched for the Greenwood Braves in South Carolina.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2005
Florence M. Kramer, a retired high school English teacher and former artist's model who was one of the early residents to settle in Columbia, died in her sleep Sunday at Charlestown Retirement Community in Catonsville. She was 101. Mrs. Kramer was born Florence May Coulter and raised in Oglesby, Ill., where her father was a jeweler and watchmaker. Her mother, a former schoolteacher, operated the local telephone switchboard that was located in her husband's shop. "From the age of 6, she helped her mother and father work the switchboard for the area's telephone network, and as she got older, she helped with the billing and hand-delivery of telephone bills," said Theresa Ottery of Ellicott City, Mrs. Kramer's friend and personal representative.
NEWS
By Nancy Pate and Nancy Pate,Orlando Sentinel | November 28, 1993
Black horses gallop on the cobblestone streets. Lightning flashes through the rainy darkness to illuminate a swaying coach. Three shots ring out.All is not well in fin de siecle Vienna. The city's glittering era of artistic vibrancy and scientific discovery also is a time of political discord and societal unrest. The rich go to the opera and eat strudel; factory workers wrap broken boots in rags to keep out the cold. Furthermore, Vienna's women are dying -- some by their own hands, others at the hands of a killer who has taken to sending the baffled police teasing notes: "Where oh where is Gertrude Van De Vere?
NEWS
By Nancy Pate and Nancy Pate,Orlando Sentinel | November 12, 1995
"The Afterlife and Other Stories," by John Updike. Fawcett Crest. 320 pages. $6.99 Small epiphanies illuminate many of these 21 stories, most of them the familiar domestic dramas of the upper middle class. There's an autumnal air, however, as characters reflect on youth gone by, mortality growing ever closer. In the superb title story, an older man realizes, with some satisfaction, that there are "vast areas of the world he no longer cared about - Henry James, for example, and professional ice hockey, and nuclear disarmament."
NEWS
April 2, 2004
On April 1, 2004, JAMES FRANK HENRY of Hanover, MD beloved husband of Nellie M. (nee Collison), devoted father of Barbara Glodek, Michael Henry, Mary Nell Henry, Janice Henry Rogers and Jeffrey D. Henry, cherished brother of Mary Huggins and Mae Bradley of Dalton, GA. Loving grandfather of Dr. Andrea Sarchiapone, Cara L. Henry, Christopher Henry, Gregory Rogers and Joshua Henry Relatives and friends are invited to call at the GARY L. KAUFMAN FUNERAL HOME...
NEWS
March 14, 2004
On March 11, 2004 Henry James Roehner Jr. of Brooklyn Park, devoted father of Henry James Roehner 3rd. Loving grandfather of Henry James Roehner 4th and Renee Brinkerhoff. Loving great grandfather of Kiersten Brinkerhoff. Friends may call at the family owned Kirkley-Ruddick Funeral Home P.A., 421 Crain Highway S.E. Glen Burnie on Sunday 3-5 & 7-9 P.M. Services will be held on Monday at 10:00 AM. Interment in Crownsville MD Veterans Cemetery. INE SALAMONE (nee Grimaldi); beloved wife of the late Aurelio W. Salamone; beloved sister of Mary Josephine Falter.
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