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By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | February 19, 1992
The final member of what the State's Attorney Office termed a Florida-to-Carroll County cocaine ring is expected to be sentenced tomorrowin Circuit Court.Henry Hernandez of Miami faces sentencing on a conspiracy conviction stemming from a plea agreement with the State'sAttorney's Office, in which charges against him, his brother and hissister-in-law under Maryland's drug kingpin statutes were dropped.Henry Hernandez, his brother Fernando Hernandez, 28, and Fernando's wife, Bonnie, were indicted by a county grand jury in January on charges that they ran the cocaine ring.
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NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | February 23, 1995
Having last month lost the latest round in his four-year quest to shorten his 14-year prison sentence, Taneytown cocaine dealer Fernando Hernandez is asking the state's second-highest court for another chance to argue his case.Hernandez, who in 1991 pleaded guilty to charges of cocaine possession and conspiracy to distribute, has asked the Court of Special Appeals to reconsider Carroll Circuit Judge Raymond E. Beck Sr.'s Jan. 11 denial of his request for a trial.In the request, filed Feb. 10, Hernandez said that Judge Beck should not have presided over Hernandez's November 1994 post-conviction relief hearing, and that he should not have thrown out Hernandez's assertions that his guilty plea was not made freely and voluntarily.
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NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | April 5, 1992
When Henry Hernandez accepted a secret plea agreement to settle the state's attorney's drug kingpin case against him, he was told he probably wouldn't have to serve any time behind bars.But, as a resultof the agreement, Hernandez could find himself kicked out of the country he has called home for 11 years.Hernandez was among the first three people charged under the state's drug kingpin law in Carroll. He, his brother Fernando, and Fernando's wife Bonnie, were indicted last January on the drug kingpin charges, charges that were dropped after all three entered into plea agreements with State's Attorney Thomas E. Hickman.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | November 17, 1994
The arrest this week of three people on "drug kingpin" charges marks only the second time Carroll County prosecutors have used one of the most powerful weapons in Maryland's drug war arsenal.But, unlike the first time prosecutors lodged such charges -- against a Miami man, his Taneytown brother and the brother's wife four years ago -- Carroll drug officers this time have apparently seized enough drugs to meet the statute's definition of a kingpin.In raids Monday and Tuesday that marked the culmination of an eight-week investigation dubbed "Operation Center Court," Carroll drug officers arrested nine people.
NEWS
February 23, 1992
Henry Hernandez, the Miami man who was indicted last year under the state's drug kingpin statute, was given a 10-year suspended sentence last week.Hernandez, his brother, Fernando Hernandez, and Fernando's wife, Bonnie, were indicted by a county grand jury in January 1990 on charges that they ran a Florida-to-Carroll cocaine ring.Henry Hernandez was the last of the three to be sentenced in the case, in which drug kingpin charges ultimately were dropped.He was sentenced on a misdemeanor conspiracy conviction, stemming from theplea agreement with the state's attorney in which the kingpin charges were dropped, and his sentence was far lighter than that of his brother.
NEWS
By Maria Archangelo and Maria Archangelo,Staff writer | September 11, 1991
Two Taneytown residents and a Miami man accused of conspiring to bring cocaine into Carroll have worked out plea agreements with the State's Attorney's Office, officials said yesterday.The three faced charges under the state's drug kingpin statute, which went into effectJuly 1990. Conviction under the statute carries a mandatory penalty of 20 years in jail without chance of parole.All the details of the plea agreements were not available, but Carroll State's Attorney Thomas Hickman said the drug kingpin charges officially will be dropped when the three go before Circuit Judge Raymond E. Beck tomorrow.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | August 23, 1993
The wife of convicted Taneytown drug dealer Fernando Antonio Hernandez, one of only three people in Carroll to be charged under the state's drug kingpin law, is seeking an end to their 11-year marriage.In divorce papers filed in Carroll Circuit Court last week, Bonnie Sharon Hernandez -- who herself was charged under the kingpin law -- says her husband's 14-year sentence leaves "no reasonable hope or expectation of a reconciliation."She is seeking custody of the couple's three children, child support and nearly $600 to cover half of the couple's overdue state and federal taxes.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | April 8, 1992
As part of his secret plea agreement with Carroll County prosecutors, Henry Hernandez provided county, state and federal drug officials with inside information on cocaine trafficking in Maryland and Florida.But that information -- called "significant" by Hernandez's immigration attorney -- may not be enough to keep him from being deportedback to Colombia.The Colombian national pleaded guilty to drug conspiracy charges in December to settle Carroll State's Attorney Thomas E. Hickman's drug kingpin case against him.He was given a 10-year suspended sentence Feb. 20 by Carroll Circuit Judge Luke K. Burns Jr.Details ofthat agreement, however, were sealed by Burns.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | August 30, 1992
A Taneytown man will not be allowed to rescind the guilty plea that put him behind bars for the next 14 years as one of the first people charged in Carroll under the state's drug kingpin law.Without comment, the Court of Special Appeals denied Fernando Hernandez's request to withdraw from the plea agreement he made last September.By pleading guilty to charges of conspiracy to distribute cocaine and possession with the intent to distribute cocaine, Hernandez got prosecutors to drop kingpin charges that could have sent him to state prison for a minimum of 20 years.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | May 19, 1993
An immigration judge yesterday rejected the government' bid to deport Taneytown cocaine dealer Fernando Hernandez, one of only three people in Carroll to be charged under the state's drug kingpin law."The court seemed to think Fernando was not trafficking in drugs, he was not a big dealer and that he wasn't a kingpin," said Ana C. Zigel, Hernandez's Owings Mills immigration attorney."The court said he doesn't show the characteristics of a drug dealer, and he turned to cocaine out of financial desperation."
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | November 17, 1994
The arrest this week of three people on "drug kingpin" charges marks only the second time Carroll County prosecutors have used one of the most powerful weapons in Maryland's drug war arsenal.But, unlike the first time prosecutors lodged such charges -- against a Miami man, his Taneytown brother and the brother's wife four years ago -- Carroll drug officers this time have apparently seized enough drugs to meet the statute's definition of a kingpin.In a series of raids Monday and Tuesday that marked the culmination of an eight-week investigation dubbed "Operation Center Court," Carroll drug officers arrested nine people.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | August 23, 1993
The wife of convicted Taneytown drug dealer Fernando Antonio Hernandez, one of only three people in Carroll to be charged under the state's drug kingpin law, is seeking an end to their 11-year marriage.In divorce papers filed in Carroll Circuit Court last week, Bonnie Sharon Hernandez -- who herself was charged under the kingpin law -- says her husband's 14-year sentence leaves "no reasonable hope or expectation of a reconciliation."She is seeking custody of the couple's three children, child support and nearly $600 to cover half of the couple's overdue state and federal taxes.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | May 19, 1993
An immigration judge yesterday rejected the government' bid to deport Taneytown cocaine dealer Fernando Hernandez, one of only three people in Carroll to be charged under the state's drug kingpin law."The court seemed to think Fernando was not trafficking in drugs, he was not a big dealer and that he wasn't a kingpin," said Ana C. Zigel, Hernandez's Owings Mills immigration attorney."The court said he doesn't show the characteristics of a drug dealer, and he turned to cocaine out of financial desperation."
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | November 12, 1992
C After Fernando and Bonnie Hernandez were indicted on numerous drug-kingpin charges early last year, the county's drug task force seized their Taneytown home and filed a forfeiture suit in Carroll Circuit Court.The Carroll County Narcotics Task Force had sheriff's deputies serve the Hernandezes with notice of the forfeiture, post notices of the forfeiture on the property and even place notices of the suit on a bulletin board in the courthouse.But the prosecutor in charge of the task force made one technical mistake: He failed to advertise the forfeiture suit in a local newspaper, as is required under state law.And that mistake cost the task force the house, Circuit Judge Luke K. Burns Jr. ruled in March 1991.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | September 6, 1992
WESTMINSTER -- Taneytown drug dealer Fernando Hernandez stood in front of Circuit Judge Luke K. Burns Jr. and tearfully begged for a reduction of his 14-year prison sentence."
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | August 30, 1992
A Taneytown man will not be allowed to rescind the guilty plea that put him behind bars for the next 14 years as one of the first people charged in Carroll under the state's drug kingpin law.Without comment, the Court of Special Appeals denied Fernando Hernandez's request to withdraw from the plea agreement he made last September.By pleading guilty to charges of conspiracy to distribute cocaine and possession with the intent to distribute cocaine, Hernandez got prosecutors to drop kingpin charges that could have sent him to state prison for a minimum of 20 years.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | September 6, 1992
WESTMINSTER -- Taneytown drug dealer Fernando Hernandez stood in front of Circuit Judge Luke K. Burns Jr. and tearfully begged for a reduction of his 14-year prison sentence."
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | November 12, 1992
C After Fernando and Bonnie Hernandez were indicted on numerous drug-kingpin charges early last year, the county's drug task force seized their Taneytown home and filed a forfeiture suit in Carroll Circuit Court.The Carroll County Narcotics Task Force had sheriff's deputies serve the Hernandezes with notice of the forfeiture, post notices of the forfeiture on the property and even place notices of the suit on a bulletin board in the courthouse.But the prosecutor in charge of the task force made one technical mistake: He failed to advertise the forfeiture suit in a local newspaper, as is required under state law.And that mistake cost the task force the house, Circuit Judge Luke K. Burns Jr. ruled in March 1991.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | April 8, 1992
As part of his secret plea agreement with Carroll County prosecutors, Henry Hernandez provided county, state and federal drug officials with inside information on cocaine trafficking in Maryland and Florida.But that information -- called "significant" by Hernandez's immigration attorney -- may not be enough to keep him from being deportedback to Colombia.The Colombian national pleaded guilty to drug conspiracy charges in December to settle Carroll State's Attorney Thomas E. Hickman's drug kingpin case against him.He was given a 10-year suspended sentence Feb. 20 by Carroll Circuit Judge Luke K. Burns Jr.Details ofthat agreement, however, were sealed by Burns.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | April 5, 1992
When Henry Hernandez accepted a secret plea agreement to settle the state's attorney's drug kingpin case against him, he was told he probably wouldn't have to serve any time behind bars.But, as a resultof the agreement, Hernandez could find himself kicked out of the country he has called home for 11 years.Hernandez was among the first three people charged under the state's drug kingpin law in Carroll. He, his brother Fernando, and Fernando's wife Bonnie, were indicted last January on the drug kingpin charges, charges that were dropped after all three entered into plea agreements with State's Attorney Thomas E. Hickman.
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