Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHenry Ford
IN THE NEWS

Henry Ford

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 31, 2009
On August 26, 2009, HENRY FORD DAVIS, SR.; devoted husband of Mildred Ann Davis. Friends may visit the FAMILY OWNED MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue, on Tuesday after 8:30 AM. The family will receive friends on Wednesday at the City Temple of Baltimore Baptist Church, 317 Dolphin Street, at 10 AM followed by funeral service at 10:30 AM.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | November 20, 2013
Walmart just reported shrinking sales for a third straight quarter. What's going on? Explained William S. Simon, the CEO of Walmart, referring to the company's customers, "Their income is going down while food costs are not. Gas and energy prices, while they're abating, I think they're still eating up a big piece of the customer's budget. " Walmart's CEO gets it. Most of Walmart's customers are still in the Great Recession, grappling with stagnant or declining pay. So, naturally, the company's sales are dropping.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jonathan Cohen and By Jonathan Cohen,Special to the Sun | November 25, 2001
Henry Ford and the Jews: The Mass Production of Hate, by Neil Baldwin. Public Affairs. 416 pages. $27.50. Neil Baldwin's Henry Ford and the Jews is a crisp account of Henry Ford's utterly crazy belief in a Jewish conspiracy to take over the world. Other than those with a special interest in the details of Ford's mania, however, readers looking for a compelling history of ideas or perhaps just a useful moral may be disappointed. As told by Baldwin, Ford's story casts only a little light on the fleeting history of anti-Semitism in America and offers no insight into why and where truly murderous anti-Semitism continues to flourish today, albeit in other parts of the world.
NEWS
By Louise Vest | October 8, 2013
50 Years Ago Homegrown talent "Local Talent Entertains at Harriet Tubman, PTA. "The Harriet Tubman High School PTA held its first activity for the year, an October Feast. "In reality, this was a 'kick off' dinner to start the PTA membership drive, as well as, to begin the 1963-64 activities. The program this year consisted of home talent rather than having a guest speaker from outside the county. "Morris L. Woodson, Principal of the Guildford Elementary School, acted as Toastmaster.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2002
IF YOU WANT the societal revolution once promised by the dot-com visionaries to come to pass, refuse to buy a new computer. Stand pat on your single-gigahertz model and scream - as a technological harbinger of another generation said in the movie Network - "I'm mad as hell and I'm not going to take it anymore." In other words, make the promise of technology come true by slamming on your brakes in the fast lane of the information superhighway. Ironic, isn't it? But consider this: Would television have had the impact it did if 45 years ago your Mom had turned on the set and, about every two years, found out it no longer picked up I Love Lucy?
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2001
Several weeks ago, Ford Motor Co. announced that it was terminating its 104-year relationship with Bridgestone/Firestone Inc. in the wake of last year's recall of 6.5 million tires that were standard equipment on Ford's Explorer sport-utility vehicles. The company's relationship with the tire maker dates to 1897, when founder Henry Ford purchased a set of tires for his first automobile from Harvey S. Firestone. In 1906, Ford's purchase of 2,000 sets of Firestone tires at $55 a set was at the time the single largest contract for tires in the world.
NEWS
December 31, 2006
The People's Tycoon: Henry Ford and the American Century By Steven Watts Henry Ford set off the consumer revolution by producing a car affordable to the masses, all the while lamenting the moral toll exacted by consumerism. He believed in giving his workers a living wage, though he was entirely opposed to union labor. He had a warm and loving relationship with his wife but sired a son with another woman. A rabid anti-Semite, he embraced African-American workers in the era of Jim Crow.
NEWS
June 2, 2005
Josephine Clay Ford, 81, a leading philanthropist and the only granddaughter of automotive pioneer Henry Ford, died yesterday at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. At her death, Mrs. Ford owned more than 13 million shares of Ford Motor stock -- about 18 percent of the stock held exclusively by family members. In 2001, Time magazine estimated her fortune at $416 million. The Detroit Institute of Arts, the Josephine Ford Cancer Center and the College for Creative Studies, an art and design college in Detroit, were among recipients of millions from "Dody" Ford and the foundation she established with her late husband, Walter Buhl Ford II. The coincidentally named Mr. Ford, a noted interior and industrial designer, began his career with rival General Motors Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Shelden and Michael Shelden,Special to the Sun | August 28, 2005
BIOGRAPHY THE PEOPLE'S TYCOON: HENRY FORD AND THE AMERICAN CENTURY By Steven Watts. Alfred A. Knopf. 608 pages. Henry Ford's brain ran almost entirely on instinct and image. If he had a good hunch about something and could easily picture it, he was unstoppable, devising not only such wonders as the Model T, but also the assembly-line process that made its mass production possible. But he could be downright dangerous on the rare occasions when an abstract concept unrelated to his work found its way into his head.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 7, 2005
DETROIT - Former Chrysler Chairman and CEO Lee Iacocca is returning as a pitchman for the automaker, which is even bringing back his old tagline: "If you can find a better car, buy it." The 81-year-old retired auto executive, who led Chrysler Corp.'s comeback from near-bankruptcy in the early 1980s, will star in a $75 million campaign to tout Chrysler's "Employee Pricing Plus," a response to GM's popular "Employee Discount for Everyone" program. The program allows consumers to buy many 2005 Chrysler, Dodge and Jeep models at the same prices that employees pay. The Iacocca ad campaign was to be announced yesterday.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | September 5, 2013
Congress will reconvene shortly. That means more battles over taxes and spending, regulations and safety nets, and how to get the economy out of first gear. Which means more gridlock and continual showdowns over budget resolutions and the debt ceiling. But before the hostilities start again and we all get lost in political strategies and petty tactics, it's useful to consider what's really at stake for our economy and democracy. For much of the past century, the basic bargain at the heart of America was that employers paid their workers enough to buy what American employers were selling.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | April 7, 2010
M aryland is poised to become the first state in the country to recognize a kind of company that would be authorized to devote significant profits to society, the environment and other causes that have nothing to do with its shareholders' wallets. I don't know whether the idea of "benefit corporations" will take off. The record of old-fashioned, greedy corporations in raising everyone's living standards has been pretty impressive over the past three centuries. But look no further than the past two years of recession to see the deep flaws of traditional capitalism.
NEWS
August 31, 2009
On August 26, 2009, HENRY FORD DAVIS, SR.; devoted husband of Mildred Ann Davis. Friends may visit the FAMILY OWNED MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue, on Tuesday after 8:30 AM. The family will receive friends on Wednesday at the City Temple of Baltimore Baptist Church, 317 Dolphin Street, at 10 AM followed by funeral service at 10:30 AM.
TRAVEL
By Liz Atwood | April 5, 2009
This weekend, all eyes are on Detroit, or at least on Ford Field, where the NCAA men's basketball championship is being played. But athletics are just part of the excitement of Motor City. Here are five other things to see: 1 Motown Historical Museum : The museum is home of the world-famous Studio A, which Berry Gordy Jr. called Hitsville, U.S.A. This is where the Temptations, Marvin Gaye and other artists recorded some of their best work. The museum features historical photographs, artwork, music, costumes and the original recording studio.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | November 25, 2008
Henry J. Ford, a certified public accountant and longtime Ellicott City resident, died Saturday of complications from a liver transplant at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 48. Mr. Ford was born in Baltimore and raised in Reisterstown, where he graduated from Franklin High School in 1979. He earned a bachelor's degree in accounting from what is now Frostburg State University in 1987, and for the past 19 years had been an auditor for the Defense Contract Audit Agency in Columbia. Mr. Ford was a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, the comprehensive transplant center patient committee at Johns Hopkins Hospital and committee member of Boy Scout Troop 615. Mr. Ford was a Ravens and Colts fan, and also enjoyed raising border collies and shelties.
NEWS
December 31, 2006
The People's Tycoon: Henry Ford and the American Century By Steven Watts Henry Ford set off the consumer revolution by producing a car affordable to the masses, all the while lamenting the moral toll exacted by consumerism. He believed in giving his workers a living wage, though he was entirely opposed to union labor. He had a warm and loving relationship with his wife but sired a son with another woman. A rabid anti-Semite, he embraced African-American workers in the era of Jim Crow.
NEWS
By Andrew J. Glass | November 29, 1998
WASHINGTON -- December will usher in a quiet milestone in American life: Some 52 million homes -- half of all U.S. households -- will have at least one personal computer.Low prices and a desire to be linked to the Internet drove nearly 4 million buyers to purchase their first PCs in the first half of 1998, a newly released market survey by ZD Market Intelligence shows.That torrid pace has held up, even ahead of the Christmas buying season, industry analysts report. It's likely that 1998 will see more than 8 million new PC users -- nearly double the 4.9 million first-time buyers in 1997.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | September 17, 2006
I've always marveled at family businesses. After all, many families can't agree on who merits a drumstick at Thanksgiving. The reading of a patriarch's will can prompt dueling lawsuits. No surprise The summer after high school I worked in the warehouse of a large family-owned catalog company. The sons left at noon for the golf course and the aging founder unfortunately had deteriorated to the point where he could barely remember their names. It came as no surprise to me that the catalog company later failed.
BUSINESS
By John O'Dell and John O'Dell,Los Angeles Times | September 15, 2006
Moving to speed and possibly expand its plan to slash 30,000 jobs from its manufacturing payroll, Ford Motor Co. will offer retirement incentives and buyout packages of as much as $140,000 to all employees at its U.S. factories. More than 75,000 blue-collar workers are eligible for the programs, disclosed yesterday by the United Auto Workers union and acknowledged by Ford. In all, Ford has about 110,000 employees in the United States. The offer is similar to a retirement and buyout plan offered this year by General Motors Corp.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.