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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun theater critic | October 26, 2006
"You couldn't change my mind if you talked for a hundred years," a character insists in Twelve Angry Men. But minds were made to be changed, and that's exactly what happens in Reginald Rose's play. How and why it happens forms the action of this jury room drama, which got its start as a 1954 teleplay, was turned into a 1957 movie (starring Henry Fonda) and finally made its Broadway debut two years ago. Twelve Angry Men continues through Nov. 5 at the Hippodrome Theatre, 12 N. Eutaw St. $27-$67.
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NEWS
July 19, 2007
WAYNE DOWNING, 67 Retired general The retired general, one of President Bush's key counterterrorism advisers after the Sept. 11 attacks, died yesterday in Peoria, Ill., a coroner said. . The four-star general, a West Point graduate, was admitted to the hospital Monday, suffering from bacterial meningitis and multiple myeloma, a form of cancer, Peoria County Coroner Johnna Ingersoll said. General Downing retired in 1996 after 34 years in the military, ending his career as head of all U.S. special operations forces.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 13, 1992
It's billed as a "tribute" and "film retrospective." But "Fonda on Fonda," at 8 and midnight tonight on cable's TNT,is high-wire psychodrama.The show is one hour of Jane Fonda talking about -- or introducing clips of others talking about -- her late father, Henry Fonda. She starts out like a conventional host of a TV retrospective, talking about her father as an actor and what his public persona came to represent. But, by the end of the hour, she is in tears, clearly lost in personal memories.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun theater critic | October 26, 2006
"You couldn't change my mind if you talked for a hundred years," a character insists in Twelve Angry Men. But minds were made to be changed, and that's exactly what happens in Reginald Rose's play. How and why it happens forms the action of this jury room drama, which got its start as a 1954 teleplay, was turned into a 1957 movie (starring Henry Fonda) and finally made its Broadway debut two years ago. Twelve Angry Men continues through Nov. 5 at the Hippodrome Theatre, 12 N. Eutaw St. $27-$67.
NEWS
June 13, 1994
* Herbert Anderson, 77, a versatile movie and stage actor who was best known as the owlish father of television's "Dennis the Menace," died in his sleep Saturday at his Palm Springs, Calif., home. Mr. Anderson had a stroke about two months ago, said family spokesman Mike Vest. Born in Oakland, Calif., Mr. Anderson acted in Broadway, television and movie roles but was best known as Henry Mitchell from the 1959-1963 CBS series. His acting career began with Warner Bros. in 1939, and his big break came in 1941 with the musical comedy "Navy Blues," starring Ann Sheridan and Martha Raye.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | August 6, 1997
Two films airing on Showtime today may be enough for you to consider calling in sick today, or at least taking a long lunch.Maggie Smith won the first of her two Academy Awards for 1969's "The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie" (11: 15 a.m.-1: 15 p.m.), where she's marvelous as a teacher at a Scottish girls' school in 1932 whose students become immersed in art, music and some ill-chosen politics. There are even a few romantic subplots and some schoolgirl conniving thrown in for good measure. But the story is secondary to Smith, who's so good that her performance has since become a model for every would-be actress trying to portray an English schoolteacher.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | October 4, 1997
Day 2 of AMC's fifth annual Film Preservation Festival devotes itself to the films of Alfred Hitchcock, so you know plenty of good stuff is in store.The day's highlight is the TV debut of the restored version of "Vertigo" (8 p.m.-10: 15 p.m.), with James Stewart as a police investigator obsessed with a woman he's been asked to investigate. Kim Novak plays the mysterious woman he loses and then finds? The film is a masterpiece, and the $1 million restoration was worth every penny, restoring both the film's vivid colors and its wide-screen glory.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | August 5, 1999
Five John Ford films you won't want to miss this weekend:"How Green Was My Valley" (1941, 8 p.m.-10: 05 p.m. and midnight-2: 05 a.m. tomorrow) -- Ford won the third of his four Best Director Oscars for this sentimental look at life in a Welsh mining town at the turn of the century. Walter Pidgeon, Maureen O'Hara, Donald Crisp, Barry Fitzgerald and Roddy McDowall star in a film that reveals Ford's basic sentimentality better than any other (save perhaps for "The Quiet Man")."Battle of Midway" and "December 7th" (1942 and 1943, 3: 15 p.m.-4: 30 p.m. tomorrow)
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett | February 13, 1994
Harold Greenwald's stage presenceSo just how important is theater to Harold Greenwald?"I would almost rather do theater than eat -- almost," says Mr. Greenwald, who turns 83 this week.For about 35 years, Mr. Greenwald's "real" job was a high school history teacher at Baltimore City College. In his spare time, though, he wrote articles and sold ads for playbills, the informational pamphlets distributed at theaters.Mr. Greenwald retired in 1971. He retired from teaching, that is. He still contributes to playbills for the Morris A. Mechanic and Lyric theaters, including writing the "Curtain Going Up" column.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 2, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- At roughly 9 o'clock this morning, 12 men and women were to head to the courtroom of Judge Lance A. Ito. But instead of taking their customary spots in the two rows of blue seats that are the jury box, they will sit around a table in a room nearby and begin weighing the fate of O. J. Simpson.Estimates of how long they will take range from a few days to several weeks. But these predictions, like almost everything else about the panelists and their predilections, are what Mr. Simpson's chief lawyer, Johnnie L. Cochran Jr., would call "rank speculation."
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 23, 2005
Back in 1968, audiences delighted in seeing beloved film veterans Henry Fonda and Lucille Ball play newlyweds with 18 kids between them. Watching them trying to manage such a big, unruly brood made for a lot of grins and a fine, family-friendly night at the movies. It also served as an inspiration for TV's The Brady Bunch. The 2005 remake of Yours, Mine and Ours proves one thing beyond dispute: Dennis Quaid and Rene Russo are not Henry Fonda and Lucille Ball. No disrespect to Quaid or Russo, fine actors both.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Charles Taylor | May 15, 2005
My Life So Far By Jane Fonda. Random House, 599 pages. $26.95. Anyone old enough to remember the vitriol directed at Jane Fonda during the '60s and '70s -- some of it brought on by her own foolishness; most of it deeply ugly; none of it having anything to do with her abilities as an actress -- might be loath to add to the criticism. This is why it gives me no pleasure to report that her new autobiography, My Life So Far, is a very bad book. Forgoing the "and then I starred in ..." model of celebrity memoir, Fonda has chosen to write her story as a piece of self-examination, to find the narrative threads in her life.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2002
In thy face I see the map of honor, truth, and loyalty. -- William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 2 Yuppies don't have loyalty. They have useful relationships and meaningful encounters. -- English religious leader William Kristol If you've been paying attention to the news, you've no doubt noticed that one virtue in particular has been taking a drubbing lately. To say the least, these have not been proud days for loyalty, and not only because of John Walker Lindh. Enron, the Mommie Dearest of corporations, treated its employees like dupes in a con game.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 15, 2000
"Nuremberg," a four-hour film about the trial of 22 Nazi war criminals at Nuremberg after World War II, is the kind of made-for-TV movie the broadcast networks rarely make anymore - a historical work of social conscience with a rock-ribbed moral center. And they should be ashamed. Lucky for us, cable television channels such as HBO and TNT have stepped in to fill the void. And they should be commended. "Nuremberg," which premieres tomorrow night on TNT, is one of the more important made-for-TV movie events of the year.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | August 5, 1999
Five John Ford films you won't want to miss this weekend:"How Green Was My Valley" (1941, 8 p.m.-10: 05 p.m. and midnight-2: 05 a.m. tomorrow) -- Ford won the third of his four Best Director Oscars for this sentimental look at life in a Welsh mining town at the turn of the century. Walter Pidgeon, Maureen O'Hara, Donald Crisp, Barry Fitzgerald and Roddy McDowall star in a film that reveals Ford's basic sentimentality better than any other (save perhaps for "The Quiet Man")."Battle of Midway" and "December 7th" (1942 and 1943, 3: 15 p.m.-4: 30 p.m. tomorrow)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | October 4, 1997
Day 2 of AMC's fifth annual Film Preservation Festival devotes itself to the films of Alfred Hitchcock, so you know plenty of good stuff is in store.The day's highlight is the TV debut of the restored version of "Vertigo" (8 p.m.-10: 15 p.m.), with James Stewart as a police investigator obsessed with a woman he's been asked to investigate. Kim Novak plays the mysterious woman he loses and then finds? The film is a masterpiece, and the $1 million restoration was worth every penny, restoring both the film's vivid colors and its wide-screen glory.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 23, 2005
Back in 1968, audiences delighted in seeing beloved film veterans Henry Fonda and Lucille Ball play newlyweds with 18 kids between them. Watching them trying to manage such a big, unruly brood made for a lot of grins and a fine, family-friendly night at the movies. It also served as an inspiration for TV's The Brady Bunch. The 2005 remake of Yours, Mine and Ours proves one thing beyond dispute: Dennis Quaid and Rene Russo are not Henry Fonda and Lucille Ball. No disrespect to Quaid or Russo, fine actors both.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In his new movie, "Ulee's Gold," actor Peter Fonda had to become Ulysses Jackson, a Florida beekeeper who was in every way Fonda's opposite: remote, taciturn, unforthcoming. Luckily, Fonda was familiar with the type. A man fitting that description sat at the head of the table during Fonda's upbringing. His name was Henry."I had been a kid to Ulee Henry," Peter Fonda said in a recent interview. "Reticent, nonverbal, nontactile, nondemonstrative. Knowing how that made me feel as a child gave me the areas to go through to become [Ulee]
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | August 6, 1997
Two films airing on Showtime today may be enough for you to consider calling in sick today, or at least taking a long lunch.Maggie Smith won the first of her two Academy Awards for 1969's "The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie" (11: 15 a.m.-1: 15 p.m.), where she's marvelous as a teacher at a Scottish girls' school in 1932 whose students become immersed in art, music and some ill-chosen politics. There are even a few romantic subplots and some schoolgirl conniving thrown in for good measure. But the story is secondary to Smith, who's so good that her performance has since become a model for every would-be actress trying to portray an English schoolteacher.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In his new movie, "Ulee's Gold," actor Peter Fonda had to become Ulysses Jackson, a Florida beekeeper who was in every way Fonda's opposite: remote, taciturn, unforthcoming. Luckily, Fonda was familiar with the type. A man fitting that description sat at the head of the table during Fonda's upbringing. His name was Henry."I had been a kid to Ulee Henry," Peter Fonda said in a recent interview. "Reticent, nonverbal, nontactile, nondemonstrative. Knowing how that made me feel as a child gave me the areas to go through to become [Ulee]
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