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By Julia Keller and Julia Keller,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 15, 2004
It was, you might say, a reality TV show before there was reality TV -- before there was TV, period. When Henry David Thoreau (1817-62) toddled off to the woods outside Concord, Mass., to craft his little shack and "live deep and suck out all the marrow of life," it wasn't an earnest, humble, guileless journey -- even though myth would have it so, myth that has flourished in the 150 years since Walden was published Aug. 9, 1854. It was a stunt, pure and simple. A situation dreamed up to see just what would happen if you took a city slicker with a fancy education and stuck him in a hut in the middle of nowhere with only a fishing pole, a stack of books and a spirit of adventure.
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By GARRISON KEILLOR | September 20, 2007
That crisp, clean, dry smell of autumn is in the air, so stunning and surprising every year, a smell forever connected to bright colors and fresh apples and cool grass with beads of dew and the eagerness of a boy, pencil box and tablet in hand, wending his way toward Benson School and Mrs. Moehlenbrock's sunny classroom. The pencil box is new. Mr. Truman is president, the neighbor's son Jack is fighting the communists in Korea, and every Saturday we yearn for the University of Minnesota Golden Gophers football team to be triumphant, which sometimes they are. I loved school, where I excelled for a short time, and now my golden-haired, gap-toothed daughter, who is 9, loves it too. She tolerates weekends pretty well, but on Monday she is all eagerness, leaning forward on tiptoes with that heightened sense of possibility that is the basic component of cheerfulness, which is the secret of the good life.
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By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1997
JOE GILBERT'S latest course offering at Salisbury State University almost makes you want to repeat college.This fall, the college lecturer's students will earn a semester's credit for sauntering in and about Henry David Thoreau's Walden Pond and woods near Concord, Mass.Don't mistake "saunter" to mean Gilbert's students will simply be lolling about as they canoe, swim, hike and observe.Thoreau, who had to deal with plenty of people who confused his nature tramps with vagrancy, practically reinvented the word saunter in a spirited essay, "Walking," completed near his death in 1862.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julia Keller | August 15, 2004
Say it right! The name of the man who penned Walden is Henry David Thoreau, pronounced THOR-oh, not Tho-ROW, say scholars, even though the majority of Americans accent the last syllable. How do we know? Jeffrey S. Cramer, curator of collections at the Thoreau Institute at Walden Woods, says the evidence is irrefutable. "Thoreau himself made an incredible number of puns" on his own name, puns whose meaning hinges on saying the name as if it were "thorough." And Thoreau's friends also wrote poetry whose rhyme scheme depends on the first-syllable accent.
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By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | April 14, 1996
CONCORD, Mass. -- The old house rises stark on a small hill over Virginia Road, a thoroughfare with a long life if a short run. It was the first road into Concord when the town was established in 1635, three miles of curves and plunging hills bordered by alder and birch.The house stands empty and silent. Conifers embrace its front corners. Rhododendron crawls by the porch. A small American flag decal is fading in a window above the door.A weather-worn Adirondack chair remains outside the back door.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Encyclopedia of Literature | January 10, 1999
Henry David Thoreau(1817-1862)Thoreau was an essayist, poet and a philosopher.His book "Walden" is a set of 18 essays describing his experience with basic, Transcendentalist living.The essay for which Thoreau is best known is "Civil Disobedience." He wrote it after being jailed for a night.An abolitionist, Thoreau aided slaves in the Underground Railroad and wrote a harsh denouncement of slavery with a lecture called "Slavery in Massachusetts."Pub Date: 01/10/99
FEATURES
May 17, 1998
" 'Books,' wrote Henry David Thoreau, 'are the treasured wealth of the world and the fit inheritance for generations and nations.' How right he was."Reading is one of Barbara's and my greatest joys. We both read pTC a lot as youngsters and still try to keep up with new releases. One of my favorites as a child was 'Treasure Island.'"Reading enables us to enjoy the rewards of lifelong learning, and your library is a vibrant center of learning - use it!"- George Bush, former presidentFrom "Books That Shaped Successful People," by Kevin H. Kelly (Fairview Press, 1995)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julia Keller | August 15, 2004
Say it right! The name of the man who penned Walden is Henry David Thoreau, pronounced THOR-oh, not Tho-ROW, say scholars, even though the majority of Americans accent the last syllable. How do we know? Jeffrey S. Cramer, curator of collections at the Thoreau Institute at Walden Woods, says the evidence is irrefutable. "Thoreau himself made an incredible number of puns" on his own name, puns whose meaning hinges on saying the name as if it were "thorough." And Thoreau's friends also wrote poetry whose rhyme scheme depends on the first-syllable accent.
NEWS
By Robin Stratton | March 4, 1991
Heaven is under our feet as well as over our heads-- Henry David ThoreauI don't think Henry wore a hat at Walden.It seems his head was bared to every wind,to sun and soil water bird and beast, even1/2to the woodchuck (though its undisciplinedconsumption of his beanfield bothered himat times). The laws of Concord didn't bind1/2him to a blind allegiance, nor was it whimthat led him to obey a different principlethan "thou shalt not." To skim1/2across the surface like a water-bug or lulloneself to sleep with pious platitudes wasnot to live at all. Living is the miracle1/2of choice pursued by few amid the buzzand gossip of the nameless thoughtless crowd.
FEATURES
July 12, 1993
THIS DATE IN HISTORY: JULY 12In 100 B.C., the Roman Emperor Julius Caesar was born.In 1543, England's King Henry VIII married his sixth and last wife, Catherine Parr, who outlived him.In 1690 (by the New Style calendar), Protestant forces led by William of Orange defeated the Roman Catholic army of James II at the Battle of the Boyne in Ireland.In 1817, naturalist-author Henry David Thoreau was born in Concord, Mass.In 1854, George Eastman, inventor of the Kodak camera, was born in Waterville, N.Y.In 1862, Congress authorized the Medal of Honor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julia Keller and Julia Keller,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 15, 2004
It was, you might say, a reality TV show before there was reality TV -- before there was TV, period. When Henry David Thoreau (1817-62) toddled off to the woods outside Concord, Mass., to craft his little shack and "live deep and suck out all the marrow of life," it wasn't an earnest, humble, guileless journey -- even though myth would have it so, myth that has flourished in the 150 years since Walden was published Aug. 9, 1854. It was a stunt, pure and simple. A situation dreamed up to see just what would happen if you took a city slicker with a fancy education and stuck him in a hut in the middle of nowhere with only a fishing pole, a stack of books and a spirit of adventure.
NEWS
By Nancy Forgione | December 23, 2001
IN L. FRANK Baum's 1900 novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, Dorothy attempts to explain the appeal of home to the Scarecrow, who can't understand why she should want to leave the beautiful land of Oz to return to "the dry, gray place" called Kansas. "That is because you have no brains," answers Dorothy. "No matter how dreary and gray our homes are, we people of flesh and blood would rather live there than in any other country, be it ever so beautiful. There's no place like home." The Scarecrow, the voice of pure logic, responds: "If your heads were stuffed with straw, like mine, you would probably all live in the beautiful places, and then Kansas would have no people at all. It is fortunate for Kansas that you have brains."
NEWS
By Bill Earls | July 4, 2001
MIDDLETOWN, Conn. - "Walden" is one of the most influential American books ever written, and its message is about that most American of attitudes: independence. Henry David Thoreau gets ignored lately, but he set the tone for living simply, recycling, maybe even dress-down Fridays. He was antiwar before it was popular, an ecologist before anyone knew the word. In a society where a lot of people drop out temporarily, he is a role model. "Walden" opens on July 4, 1845, when, Thoreau says, "I took up my abode in the woods" and moved into a small house on the shore of Walden Pond in Concord, Mass.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Kephart and Beth Kephart,Special to the Sun | December 17, 2000
For my 40th birthday, this year, my mother gave me a diaphanous straw hat and a party to wear it to, a tome about tulips and some clothes for the garden, and Number 260 of the 500 numbered copies of Henry David Thoreau's meandering essay "Of Friendship." Drawn from "A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers" and published by Houghton Mifflin at the turn of the century, the book is thin as a pack of cigarettes, gray as the slate of old roof tiles. According to the only stray marks on its otherwise immaculate pages, it was first uncovered in a bookstore window on 7th Street in Washington, already earning, by April of 1946, the time-honored appreciation "rare."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Encyclopedia of Literature | January 10, 1999
Henry David Thoreau(1817-1862)Thoreau was an essayist, poet and a philosopher.His book "Walden" is a set of 18 essays describing his experience with basic, Transcendentalist living.The essay for which Thoreau is best known is "Civil Disobedience." He wrote it after being jailed for a night.An abolitionist, Thoreau aided slaves in the Underground Railroad and wrote a harsh denouncement of slavery with a lecture called "Slavery in Massachusetts."Pub Date: 01/10/99
FEATURES
May 17, 1998
" 'Books,' wrote Henry David Thoreau, 'are the treasured wealth of the world and the fit inheritance for generations and nations.' How right he was."Reading is one of Barbara's and my greatest joys. We both read pTC a lot as youngsters and still try to keep up with new releases. One of my favorites as a child was 'Treasure Island.'"Reading enables us to enjoy the rewards of lifelong learning, and your library is a vibrant center of learning - use it!"- George Bush, former presidentFrom "Books That Shaped Successful People," by Kevin H. Kelly (Fairview Press, 1995)
NEWS
By Andrew Todd Reiner | March 15, 1993
THOREAU'S MAINE WOODS: YESTERDAY AND TODAY. By Cheryl Seal. Photographs by Robert F. Bukaty. Yankee Books. 183 pages. $24.95.MOST of us associate Henry David Thoreau with high school English, where we might have read his classic mid-19th-century essays, "Walden." But few know that Thoreau also wrote "Maine Woods." This unfinished work about the naturalist's three journeys into the north woods was a plea for an end to the stripping of forest land -- written 100 years before most of the nation's conservation laws.
NEWS
By Bill Earls | July 4, 2001
MIDDLETOWN, Conn. - "Walden" is one of the most influential American books ever written, and its message is about that most American of attitudes: independence. Henry David Thoreau gets ignored lately, but he set the tone for living simply, recycling, maybe even dress-down Fridays. He was antiwar before it was popular, an ecologist before anyone knew the word. In a society where a lot of people drop out temporarily, he is a role model. "Walden" opens on July 4, 1845, when, Thoreau says, "I took up my abode in the woods" and moved into a small house on the shore of Walden Pond in Concord, Mass.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1997
JOE GILBERT'S latest course offering at Salisbury State University almost makes you want to repeat college.This fall, the college lecturer's students will earn a semester's credit for sauntering in and about Henry David Thoreau's Walden Pond and woods near Concord, Mass.Don't mistake "saunter" to mean Gilbert's students will simply be lolling about as they canoe, swim, hike and observe.Thoreau, who had to deal with plenty of people who confused his nature tramps with vagrancy, practically reinvented the word saunter in a spirited essay, "Walking," completed near his death in 1862.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | April 14, 1996
CONCORD, Mass. -- The old house rises stark on a small hill over Virginia Road, a thoroughfare with a long life if a short run. It was the first road into Concord when the town was established in 1635, three miles of curves and plunging hills bordered by alder and birch.The house stands empty and silent. Conifers embrace its front corners. Rhododendron crawls by the porch. A small American flag decal is fading in a window above the door.A weather-worn Adirondack chair remains outside the back door.
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