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NEWS
December 17, 1990
Henry Clay Linstid Jr., 69, a retired Bendix Corp. manager, died Friday at his home in New Market, Va., after a long illness.Graveside services were being held today today at Cedar Hill Cemetery on Ritchie Highway, Glen Burnie.Mr. Linstid retired in 1986 as corporate manager of the Bendix data center in Ann Arbor, Mich.Born in Baltimore, he went to work for Bendix after his 1939 graduation from City College. He later attended night classes and graduated from the Baltimore College of Commerce.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | July 6, 2008
If the age of Republican presidential hopeful John McCain is of some concern to voters, how about the case of Henry Gassaway Davis, who was 80 when he was nominated to be Democratic nominee Alton B. Parker's vice presidential candidate in 1904? While Davis' name - not to mention Alton B. Parker's - is admittedly not on the tongues of most people these days, he does share a certain local distinction. Throughout the nation's history, there have been two vice presidential candidates from Maryland: One was elected - Spiro T. Agnew in 1968; and one was not, and that's our man Davis.
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FEATURES
By Gary Vikan and Gary Vikan,Special to the sun | October 11, 1998
"Henry Clay Frick: An Intimate Portrait," by Martha Frick Symington Sanger. Abbeville Press. 544 pages. $50.On Dec. 16, 1935, when the Frick Collection opened to the public for the first time, the New York World Telegram noted, "One forgets all about Frick himself, his feud with Carnegie, the strikes, and everything else, and gives oneself up to this heart-stirring experience."Now, after more than six decades, Frick, the man has been substantially lost in our collective consciousness but his magnificent art collection remains as heart-stirring as ever.
NEWS
September 1, 2004
On August 30, 2004, HENRY CLAY HAMMETT, SR.; former husband of Mary Kavlick; devoted father of Henry Clay Hammett, Jr., Joyce Ellen Walter and Glenn Louis Hammett; loving brother of Jack Hammett; loving grandfather of Robin, Brad, Damien and Todd; loving great-grandfather of five. Friends may call at the CVACH/ROSEDALE FUNERAL HOME, 1211 Chesaco Avenue, on Wednesday, 7 to 9 P.M. Services will be held Thursday, 11 A.M. from the funeral home. Interment Gardens of Faith Cemetery. For those desiring, memorials may be made in his memory to the American Cancer Society.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1998
At the beginning of the 20th century, the blunt, brooding steelman Henry Clay Frick was bitterly scorned as "the most hated man in America."In the era of robber-baron industrialists, Frick embodied the public image of the cold, ruthless capitalist whose philosophy was unfettered business, whose ethos was money, whose "gospel was greed."Starting out as a sickly, blue-eyed Mennonite farm boy from western Pennsylvania, Henry Clay Frick earned his first million by the time he was 30 -- on Dec. 19, 1879 -- in the industrial coke business.
NEWS
September 1, 2004
On August 30, 2004, HENRY CLAY HAMMETT, SR.; former husband of Mary Kavlick; devoted father of Henry Clay Hammett, Jr., Joyce Ellen Walter and Glenn Louis Hammett; loving brother of Jack Hammett; loving grandfather of Robin, Brad, Damien and Todd; loving great-grandfather of five. Friends may call at the CVACH/ROSEDALE FUNERAL HOME, 1211 Chesaco Avenue, on Wednesday, 7 to 9 P.M. Services will be held Thursday, 11 A.M. from the funeral home. Interment Gardens of Faith Cemetery. For those desiring, memorials may be made in his memory to the American Cancer Society.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | April 19, 1992
From The Sun April 19-25, 1842APRIL 19: The steamboats in the Delaware carried their flags at half-mast on Saturday and Sunday as a token of mourning on account of the late disaster in this city.APRIL 21: There is a vast amount of cant afloat about these days on the subject of law and order. In fact, if some editors are to be believed, one would suppose that there are no friends of law and order in the country.APRIL 22: Hon. Henry Clay -- This distinguished gentleman, and late Senator, arrived in this city last evening from Washington and took lodgings at Barnum's City Hotel.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | January 4, 1998
150 years ago in The SunJan. 5: Stopping of the Old City Mills -- These old and time-honored Mills, at the corner of Calvert and Centre streets, have at last ground their last grist. The water was stopped off on Saturday last, and machinery is now being taken out of thebuilding.Jan. 7: HON. HENRY CLAY -- His Arrival in Baltimore -- The great Statesman of the West arrived yesterday evening in Baltimore, by the western cars. He was met at the depot by a large number of friends.Jan. 8: BY MAGNETIC TELEGRAPH -- I am sorry to inform you that the steamer Sea Bird, from New Orleans for St. Louis, loaded with over one thousand kegs of powder, took fire on Wednesday, near Cape Girardeau, and blew up.100 years ago in The SunJan.
NEWS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2000
Former Sen. Bill Bradley said yesterday that it is time for one of the presidential candidates to fall on his sword so that the country can move ahead. "The sooner the better," said Bradley, a former Democratic presidential candidate, who spoke to more than 2,000 technology executives and investors at a Deutsche Banc Alex. Brown conference in Baltimore. "How we get out of this, there is no simple answer." Bradley said Vice President Al Gore and Texas Gov. George W. Bush must consider the "long-term future of the country."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | July 6, 2008
If the age of Republican presidential hopeful John McCain is of some concern to voters, how about the case of Henry Gassaway Davis, who was 80 when he was nominated to be Democratic nominee Alton B. Parker's vice presidential candidate in 1904? While Davis' name - not to mention Alton B. Parker's - is admittedly not on the tongues of most people these days, he does share a certain local distinction. Throughout the nation's history, there have been two vice presidential candidates from Maryland: One was elected - Spiro T. Agnew in 1968; and one was not, and that's our man Davis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom Linthicum and By Tom Linthicum,Special to the Sun | February 9, 2003
The Passions of Andrew Jackson, by Andrew Burstein. Alfred A. Knopf. 320 pages. $25. Andrew Jackson is a compelling historical figure whose life reads like a soap opera, replete with violence, betrayal, scandal, intrigue, heroism and great achievements. Frequently listed among the great American presidents, he is an enduring political figure whose name is often mentioned in the same breath as that of Thomas Jefferson. Andrew Burstein is a history professor at the University of Tulsa who has established himself as an epistolary detective, student of language and historical psychoanalyst in three previous books: Sentimental Democracy, The Inner Jefferson and America's Jubilee.
NEWS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2000
Former Sen. Bill Bradley said yesterday that it is time for one of the presidential candidates to fall on his sword so that the country can move ahead. "The sooner the better," said Bradley, a former Democratic presidential candidate, who spoke to more than 2,000 technology executives and investors at a Deutsche Banc Alex. Brown conference in Baltimore. "How we get out of this, there is no simple answer." Bradley said Vice President Al Gore and Texas Gov. George W. Bush must consider the "long-term future of the country."
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1998
At the beginning of the 20th century, the blunt, brooding steelman Henry Clay Frick was bitterly scorned as "the most hated man in America."In the era of robber-baron industrialists, Frick embodied the public image of the cold, ruthless capitalist whose philosophy was unfettered business, whose ethos was money, whose "gospel was greed."Starting out as a sickly, blue-eyed Mennonite farm boy from western Pennsylvania, Henry Clay Frick earned his first million by the time he was 30 -- on Dec. 19, 1879 -- in the industrial coke business.
FEATURES
By Gary Vikan and Gary Vikan,Special to the sun | October 11, 1998
"Henry Clay Frick: An Intimate Portrait," by Martha Frick Symington Sanger. Abbeville Press. 544 pages. $50.On Dec. 16, 1935, when the Frick Collection opened to the public for the first time, the New York World Telegram noted, "One forgets all about Frick himself, his feud with Carnegie, the strikes, and everything else, and gives oneself up to this heart-stirring experience."Now, after more than six decades, Frick, the man has been substantially lost in our collective consciousness but his magnificent art collection remains as heart-stirring as ever.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | January 4, 1998
150 years ago in The SunJan. 5: Stopping of the Old City Mills -- These old and time-honored Mills, at the corner of Calvert and Centre streets, have at last ground their last grist. The water was stopped off on Saturday last, and machinery is now being taken out of thebuilding.Jan. 7: HON. HENRY CLAY -- His Arrival in Baltimore -- The great Statesman of the West arrived yesterday evening in Baltimore, by the western cars. He was met at the depot by a large number of friends.Jan. 8: BY MAGNETIC TELEGRAPH -- I am sorry to inform you that the steamer Sea Bird, from New Orleans for St. Louis, loaded with over one thousand kegs of powder, took fire on Wednesday, near Cape Girardeau, and blew up.100 years ago in The SunJan.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | January 12, 1995
ELLEN SAUERBREY says dead people voted in Maryland last year. Why does she have to make it sound so dirty? The cemetery vote is as American as cherry pie. Cemetery voters (also known as the tombstone bloc) have been responsible for the victories of some of our best-known Americans, and the defeat of some well-known ones, too.For example, in 1960 John F. Kennedy ran against Richard Nixon for the presidency. As returns began to come in election night it appeared a single state could make a difference.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom Linthicum and By Tom Linthicum,Special to the Sun | February 9, 2003
The Passions of Andrew Jackson, by Andrew Burstein. Alfred A. Knopf. 320 pages. $25. Andrew Jackson is a compelling historical figure whose life reads like a soap opera, replete with violence, betrayal, scandal, intrigue, heroism and great achievements. Frequently listed among the great American presidents, he is an enduring political figure whose name is often mentioned in the same breath as that of Thomas Jefferson. Andrew Burstein is a history professor at the University of Tulsa who has established himself as an epistolary detective, student of language and historical psychoanalyst in three previous books: Sentimental Democracy, The Inner Jefferson and America's Jubilee.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | January 12, 1995
ELLEN SAUERBREY says dead people voted in Maryland last year. Why does she have to make it sound so dirty? The cemetery vote is as American as cherry pie. Cemetery voters (also known as the tombstone bloc) have been responsible for the victories of some of our best-known Americans, and the defeat of some well-known ones, too.For example, in 1960 John F. Kennedy ran against Richard Nixon for the presidency. As returns began to come in election night it appeared a single state could make a difference.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | April 19, 1992
From The Sun April 19-25, 1842APRIL 19: The steamboats in the Delaware carried their flags at half-mast on Saturday and Sunday as a token of mourning on account of the late disaster in this city.APRIL 21: There is a vast amount of cant afloat about these days on the subject of law and order. In fact, if some editors are to be believed, one would suppose that there are no friends of law and order in the country.APRIL 22: Hon. Henry Clay -- This distinguished gentleman, and late Senator, arrived in this city last evening from Washington and took lodgings at Barnum's City Hotel.
NEWS
December 17, 1990
Henry Clay Linstid Jr., 69, a retired Bendix Corp. manager, died Friday at his home in New Market, Va., after a long illness.Graveside services were being held today today at Cedar Hill Cemetery on Ritchie Highway, Glen Burnie.Mr. Linstid retired in 1986 as corporate manager of the Bendix data center in Ann Arbor, Mich.Born in Baltimore, he went to work for Bendix after his 1939 graduation from City College. He later attended night classes and graduated from the Baltimore College of Commerce.
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