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By DAN BERGER | December 21, 1992
Wouldn't you just know? When Baltimore finally got a good bookstore, it's in Towson.A prosecutor will investigate the State Department search for dirt on Clinton. The moral is, if you are going to pervert government for electoral gain, be sure to win.Israel cracked down on Muslim extremists, less hard than Egypt and Algeria did, but is condemned more, but claims higher standards.Terrorism must pay. Hamas murderers are determining the policy of every government in the Middle East.Henry Cisneros was a good boy all year and, in reward, got just what he asked for Christmas.
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NEWS
December 1, 1995
DEAR SECRETARY CISNEROS,Whether or not your scheduled address before the Maryland Association of Counties in Annapolis today centers on a housing controversy in the Baltimore region, that dispute will be foremost on the minds of a portion of the conference attendees.No doubt you're aware of the history: As Baltimore was imploding the high-rises that have failed as "safe, secure and decent" subsidized dwellings, the American Civil Liberties Union sued the city to break the concentration of poor blacks in the urban core.
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NEWS
By LAURA LIPPMAN and LAURA LIPPMAN,Laura Lippman is a reporter for The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 1992
Henry Cisneros, ex-mayor of San Antonio, the Hispanic superstar who crashed and burned, is coming to Baltimore for a commencement speech today. But I don't need to go. I see him in my bathroom every morning.An explanation may be in order. I was a reporter in San Antonio from 1983 to 1989. At a time when the whole city seemed to be buzzing about his rumored infidelities, the mayor appeared in one of Esquire's "Women We Love" issues, extolling the virtues of his wife. It was hard to decide if his audacity was appalling or admirable.
NEWS
November 11, 1994
Shameless slurping at the federal troughRecently, the wind blew in Baltimore, ripping roofs from about 70 homes and leaving more than 100 people homeless.A significant event, no doubt, particularly to those unfortunate enough to be directly affected.By 6 a.m. the next day, roughly 15 hours after the storm went through, news reports were citing communications between Housing and Urban Development Secretary Henry Cisneros and Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke to the effect that federal help was on the way.Since when does the destruction of 70 homes (some already vacant and ripe for demolition)
NEWS
February 10, 1991
Gov. Ann Richards of Texas delivered her first state of the state speech last week, described herself as "the new kid on the block" and received star treatment in Washington during the National Governors Association meeting. She got a standing ovation when she spoke to her colleagues and she turned down two network television requests to appear on interview shows. She was asked often about national ambitions, but kept saying she was content to stay in Texas.Texas has gotten so big that its best politicians almost automatically qualify as national prospects.
NEWS
November 11, 1994
Shameless slurping at the federal troughRecently, the wind blew in Baltimore, ripping roofs from about 70 homes and leaving more than 100 people homeless.A significant event, no doubt, particularly to those unfortunate enough to be directly affected.By 6 a.m. the next day, roughly 15 hours after the storm went through, news reports were citing communications between Housing and Urban Development Secretary Henry Cisneros and Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke to the effect that federal help was on the way.Since when does the destruction of 70 homes (some already vacant and ripe for demolition)
NEWS
December 1, 1995
DEAR SECRETARY CISNEROS,Whether or not your scheduled address before the Maryland Association of Counties in Annapolis today centers on a housing controversy in the Baltimore region, that dispute will be foremost on the minds of a portion of the conference attendees.No doubt you're aware of the history: As Baltimore was imploding the high-rises that have failed as "safe, secure and decent" subsidized dwellings, the American Civil Liberties Union sued the city to break the concentration of poor blacks in the urban core.
NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | October 5, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Housing Secretary Henry Cisneros said yesterday that he has no plans to resign over an investigation into allegations that he misled the FBI."I have not offered my resignation to the White House, nor are any discussions under way about resignation," Mr. Cisneros said in a statement issued by his Washington attorney, Cono Namorato.At the White House, Press Secretary Dee Dee Myers also said that Mr. Cisneros "has not offered his resignation, nor has he been asked to resign."The Justice Department is studying an ex-lover's allegation that Mr. Cisneros, the former mayor of San Antonio, misled the FBI about money he paid her after they broke up and he reconciled with his wife.
NEWS
February 17, 1995
SIGN of the times, from a recent speech in Washington:"We believe that government can help poor people best by helping people help themselves. The bottom line of government efforts to help people should be a transition to a better life. Government assistance shouldn't be an ending point, but a starting point, the beginning of a dynamic forward movement tTC that leads to self-sufficiency. . . ."Government efforts to help people should free them to make choices about their lives. Housing assistance should not tie people to buildings, it should free them to choose housing the way most Americans make that choice, on the basis of schools and services and recreation and proximity to work, and medical care and personal safety.
NEWS
By Newsday | December 4, 1992
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -- President-elect Bill Clinton and his top advisers intend to make final selections for the incoming administration's economic team over the weekend with the expectation that Sen. Lloyd Bentsen, D-Texas, would get the first offer to become secretary of the Treasury, according to Democratic sources."
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | December 21, 1992
Wouldn't you just know? When Baltimore finally got a good bookstore, it's in Towson.A prosecutor will investigate the State Department search for dirt on Clinton. The moral is, if you are going to pervert government for electoral gain, be sure to win.Israel cracked down on Muslim extremists, less hard than Egypt and Algeria did, but is condemned more, but claims higher standards.Terrorism must pay. Hamas murderers are determining the policy of every government in the Middle East.Henry Cisneros was a good boy all year and, in reward, got just what he asked for Christmas.
NEWS
By LAURA LIPPMAN and LAURA LIPPMAN,Laura Lippman is a reporter for The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 1992
Henry Cisneros, ex-mayor of San Antonio, the Hispanic superstar who crashed and burned, is coming to Baltimore for a commencement speech today. But I don't need to go. I see him in my bathroom every morning.An explanation may be in order. I was a reporter in San Antonio from 1983 to 1989. At a time when the whole city seemed to be buzzing about his rumored infidelities, the mayor appeared in one of Esquire's "Women We Love" issues, extolling the virtues of his wife. It was hard to decide if his audacity was appalling or admirable.
NEWS
February 10, 1991
Gov. Ann Richards of Texas delivered her first state of the state speech last week, described herself as "the new kid on the block" and received star treatment in Washington during the National Governors Association meeting. She got a standing ovation when she spoke to her colleagues and she turned down two network television requests to appear on interview shows. She was asked often about national ambitions, but kept saying she was content to stay in Texas.Texas has gotten so big that its best politicians almost automatically qualify as national prospects.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | December 28, 1992
Topped off by President-elect Clinton's selection of Henry Cisneros as the next secretary of Housing and Urban Development, this may be the most hopeful holiday season for America's troubled inner cities in close to a generation.Since his election, Mr. Clinton has telegraphed clear messages that forgotten and forsaken urban America will be less so in the next four years.On his first visit to Washington after Election Day, Mr. Clinton was walking along impoverished Georgia Avenue, promising a community-development bank for every poor neighborhood that needs one.Then, when he set up his economic summit in Little Rock, the president-elect invited no fewer than four leaders of community-based development organizations -- Brenda Shockley of Community Build in Los Angeles, Larry Farmer of Mississippi Action for Community Education, Hipolito Roldan of Chicago's Hispanic Housing Development Corporation, and Daphne Sloan of the Walnut Hills Redevelopment Foundation in Cincinnati.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,States News Service | June 29, 1994
WASHINGTON -- There comes a time when a city has to play hardball to protect its political interests. No more hand-holding. No more sweet-talking. No more kidding around.There comes a time when a city has only one choice: Bring out the go-go boots and the marching band.That's exactly what Baltimore did yesterday. Baton twirlers and high-steppers jumped and gyrated in front of the Department of Housing and Urban Development in a high-decibel effort to win a $100 million federal grant for an empowerment-zone project.
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