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NEWS
April 20, 2001
FOR TWO YEARS the most popular part of the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Cone Collection of early modern art, has been closed, its gems on tour. With other parts of the BMA closed for renovation and much of the Walters Art Museum closed for the same purpose at the same time, museum-hopping, museum membership and museum reverie have been in sad decline in Baltimore. Fortunately, that's over. The Walters Art Gallery helped prepare for its comeback, still awaited, by renaming itself Walters Art Museum, which is deemed more informative.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | June 3, 2012
During her long career as a sculptor and painter in Baltimore, Amalie Rothschild developed a distinctive take on geometric abstraction. You can follow the arc of that career in a gallery-filling retrospective at Towson University's Center for the Arts Gallery. Rothschild (1916-2001) was familiar with various approaches to 20th-century modernism and responded in her own way. Henri Matisse's 1935 oil painting "The Pink Nude," which belongs to the Baltimore Museum of Art 's Cone Collection, directly inspired two works by Rothschild in the present exhibit.
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FEATURES
By Hartford Courant | November 26, 1992
It's time to think about time again, as we flip through the 1993 crop of wall calendars -- the gorgeous and the goofy, the exotic and the erotic, the politically correct and the anatomically correct.What, or who, do you want to stare at for 30 days at a clip? Claudia Schiffer? NFL bods? Aaaah-nuld? Outhouses? Cute cats? New England barns? New England seasons? New England's coastline? Scottish castles? Albert Einstein? Beer bottles?No problem.As for trends, artists are as hot as ever, and it looks like another banner year for Monet, Matisse, Georgia O'Keeffe (has anyone else seen one too many of her bawdy flowers?
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2011
The Baltimore Museum of Art announced Wednesday that it has chosen the local architectural firm of Ziger/Snead to lead a $24 million renovation of the neoclassical museum building, which houses 90,000 pieces of art, including the world's largest collection of works by Henri Matisse. The Mount Vernon-based firm has designed several distinctive Baltimore buildings, including the angular, white-glass-paneled Brown Center at the Maryland Institute College of Art and the Living Classroom Foundation's headquarters overlooking the harbor in Fells Point.
NEWS
By John Goodspeed | April 13, 1992
ROBERT HENRI: HIS LIFE AND ART. By Bennard B. Perlman. Dover Publications. 176 pages. Illustrated. Paperback, $14.95. ROBERT Henri -- born in 1865 in Cincinnati, died in 1929 in New York -- is still considered one of the best U.S. painters, a great teacher and the man who initiated and organized the display of "modern" art that shoved aside "conservative" academic art in America.But as this fine biography by the Baltimore artist and scholar, Bennard Perlman, notes -- but doesn't emphasize -- Henri himself was considered conservative soon after his revolution began, and he became part of the artistic establishment for the last 15 years of his life.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | June 3, 2012
During her long career as a sculptor and painter in Baltimore, Amalie Rothschild developed a distinctive take on geometric abstraction. You can follow the arc of that career in a gallery-filling retrospective at Towson University's Center for the Arts Gallery. Rothschild (1916-2001) was familiar with various approaches to 20th-century modernism and responded in her own way. Henri Matisse's 1935 oil painting "The Pink Nude," which belongs to the Baltimore Museum of Art 's Cone Collection, directly inspired two works by Rothschild in the present exhibit.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2011
The Baltimore Museum of Art announced Wednesday that it has chosen the local architectural firm of Ziger/Snead to lead a $24 million renovation of the neoclassical museum building, which houses 90,000 pieces of art, including the world's largest collection of works by Henri Matisse. The Mount Vernon-based firm has designed several distinctive Baltimore buildings, including the angular, white-glass-paneled Brown Center at the Maryland Institute College of Art and the Living Classroom Foundation's headquarters overlooking the harbor in Fells Point.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1998
In a dramatic about-face, the Baltimore Museum of Art will remount 42 Matisse paintings from its celebrated Cone Collection in their original gilt frames rather than in the stark modern ones they have occupied since 1986.The remounting, to be completed by January 1999, represents the first major policy shift announced by the new director, Doreen Bolger, who started work at the museum last month. It is also the latest development in a long-running controversy over the museum's stewardship of the modernist artworks collected by Baltimore sisters Etta and Claribel Cone in the first half of this century.
ENTERTAINMENT
BY ARTHUR HIRSCH and BY ARTHUR HIRSCH,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2002
"The danger remains that he'll get out of the valise we put him in." -- Composer John Cage on artist Marcel Duchamp He did get out, of course, and all hell broke loose. Those roaming through contemporary art exhibitions have, knowingly or not, probably seen what happened when Marcel Duchamp emerged and ran amok through other artists' imaginations. Celebrate these happenings or mourn them, but the fact is that once they occurred there was no barring the door. Under Duchamp's influence, anything might be considered "art," and was, and will be, and much of the credit or blame sits in that little valise.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1996
An exhibition of the Baltimore Museum of Art's renowned Cone Collection will travel overseas for the first time this fall -- when the museum sends to Japan a selection of works including 65 paintings, sculptures and drawings by Henri Matisse, the museum announced yesterday."
ENTERTAINMENT
BY ARTHUR HIRSCH and BY ARTHUR HIRSCH,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2002
"The danger remains that he'll get out of the valise we put him in." -- Composer John Cage on artist Marcel Duchamp He did get out, of course, and all hell broke loose. Those roaming through contemporary art exhibitions have, knowingly or not, probably seen what happened when Marcel Duchamp emerged and ran amok through other artists' imaginations. Celebrate these happenings or mourn them, but the fact is that once they occurred there was no barring the door. Under Duchamp's influence, anything might be considered "art," and was, and will be, and much of the credit or blame sits in that little valise.
NEWS
April 20, 2001
FOR TWO YEARS the most popular part of the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Cone Collection of early modern art, has been closed, its gems on tour. With other parts of the BMA closed for renovation and much of the Walters Art Museum closed for the same purpose at the same time, museum-hopping, museum membership and museum reverie have been in sad decline in Baltimore. Fortunately, that's over. The Walters Art Gallery helped prepare for its comeback, still awaited, by renaming itself Walters Art Museum, which is deemed more informative.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1998
In a dramatic about-face, the Baltimore Museum of Art will remount 42 Matisse paintings from its celebrated Cone Collection in their original gilt frames rather than in the stark modern ones they have occupied since 1986.The remounting, to be completed by January 1999, represents the first major policy shift announced by the new director, Doreen Bolger, who started work at the museum last month. It is also the latest development in a long-running controversy over the museum's stewardship of the modernist artworks collected by Baltimore sisters Etta and Claribel Cone in the first half of this century.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1996
An exhibition of the Baltimore Museum of Art's renowned Cone Collection will travel overseas for the first time this fall -- when the museum sends to Japan a selection of works including 65 paintings, sculptures and drawings by Henri Matisse, the museum announced yesterday."
FEATURES
By Hartford Courant | November 26, 1992
It's time to think about time again, as we flip through the 1993 crop of wall calendars -- the gorgeous and the goofy, the exotic and the erotic, the politically correct and the anatomically correct.What, or who, do you want to stare at for 30 days at a clip? Claudia Schiffer? NFL bods? Aaaah-nuld? Outhouses? Cute cats? New England barns? New England seasons? New England's coastline? Scottish castles? Albert Einstein? Beer bottles?No problem.As for trends, artists are as hot as ever, and it looks like another banner year for Monet, Matisse, Georgia O'Keeffe (has anyone else seen one too many of her bawdy flowers?
NEWS
By John Goodspeed | April 13, 1992
ROBERT HENRI: HIS LIFE AND ART. By Bennard B. Perlman. Dover Publications. 176 pages. Illustrated. Paperback, $14.95. ROBERT Henri -- born in 1865 in Cincinnati, died in 1929 in New York -- is still considered one of the best U.S. painters, a great teacher and the man who initiated and organized the display of "modern" art that shoved aside "conservative" academic art in America.But as this fine biography by the Baltimore artist and scholar, Bennard Perlman, notes -- but doesn't emphasize -- Henri himself was considered conservative soon after his revolution began, and he became part of the artistic establishment for the last 15 years of his life.
FEATURES
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | May 3, 2006
German troops may have been marching outside his studio door in Nice in the summer of 1943, but the late works of French artist Henri Matisse (1869-1954) nonetheless shine with a joyful celebration of life. That's the optimistic message of Jazz, an artist book of 20 stencil prints on the theme of the circus that Matisse created from cut-paper collages during the final creative period of his life. Now that work, one of the most influential artist books of the 20th century, is the centerpiece of a lovely one-gallery exhibition at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Matisse: Jazz runs through Aug. 27 at the Baltimore Museum of Art, 10 Art Museum Drive.
TRAVEL
March 22, 2009
cezanne and beyond Where:: Philadelphia Museum of Art, Benjamin Franklin Parkway at 26th Street When:: Now through May 17. Hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-8:45 p.m. Fridays. What:: Exhibit features more than 40 paintings, 20 watercolors and drawings by the French artist Paul Cezanne. His works are displayed alongside works by more than 15 artists for whom, it has been said, Cezanne was an inspiration, including Max Beckmann, Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso. How much: : Admission is $14; $12 for seniors; $10 for students; free for children 12 and younger.
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