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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1997
WIMBLEDON, England -- They unfurled Union Jacks, wore wacky hats, painted their faces, cheered double faults and did the wave at Centre Court.L Yesterday, Wimbledon was taken over by the tennis commoners.And the tournament was seized by a 22-year-old born-in-Britain star named Tim Henman.Henman out-slugged and outlasted Paul Haarhuis, 6-7 (7-9), 6-3, 6-2, 4-6, 14-12, in a 3-hour, 58-minute match that brought tennis theater back to Wimbledon.This was Wimbledon on the "People's Sunday," as organizers opened the gates to the masses on the middle Sunday for the second time in history in a bid to clear up a backlog of rain-delayed matches.
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By Charles Bricker and Charles Bricker,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | June 24, 2005
WIMBLEDON, England - There was perhaps 10 minutes of playable light left on this uncommonly warm Thursday, just enough time for Andy Roddick to whack a few more unreturnable serves and restore order to a Wimbledon that had been turned on its ear all afternoon by a succession of upstart players. Incredibly, after dominating the free-swinging Italian Daniele Bracciali with his 130-140 mph blasts, Roddick's serve was taken apart in a third-set tiebreak and, instead of going to the locker room yesterday with a cozy ride into the third round, he found himself having to come back today and plot a way to finish off a very dangerous opponent.
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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 28, 1998
WIMBLEDON, England -- This is what Tim Henman does to Wimbledon.The great hope of British tennis walks onto Centre Court and the normally polite spectators put down their teacups and start roaring. He cracks a forehand and the cheers stream down. He wins a match and Union flags and bandannas are unfurled.Yesterday, the Henman express rolled into the third round of Wimbledon and right over Byron Black of Zimbabwe, 6-4, 6-4, 3-6, 7-5.For the third straight year, Henman is in the round of 16, and, for the third straight year, hope springs among the British that their long drought in fielding a Wimbledon men's champion could at last be ending.
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By Diane Pucin and Diane Pucin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 12, 2004
NEW YORK - Tim Henman's classic game of serve-and-volley tennis was made invisible yesterday at the U.S. Open. Henman, the 30-year-old Briton with the tidy white clothes and tidy game, was deflated by Roger Federer's precision from both the backhand and forehand sides and punctured by his sharply angled volleys. In only 1 hour, 46 minutes, Federer, the world's top-ranked player, moved into his first U.S. Open final with a 6-3, 6-4, 6-4 win over fifth-seeded Henman. In today's final, Federer will face Lleyton Hewitt, the Australian pest who didn't back down from the booming serves of Joachim Johansson and will not back down from Federer's calm pursuit of perfection.
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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 9, 2001
WIMBLEDON, England - What did you expect, a gallant British victory? Not in the country that gave the world such sports as rugby, cricket and tennis and then got beat at its own games. Not in the land where excruciating losses are not only expected, but they're also often celebrated. As Britain's Tim Henman took the court yesterday against Goran Ivanisevic for the completion of their three-day, five-set Wimbledon men's semifinal match, there was a sense of foreboding in the Centre Court stands, and perhaps in all of Britain, that the end would not be very pretty for the guy representing the home team.
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 31, 1996
NEW YORK -- Tim Henman, the first Englishman to make it to the quarterfinals at Wimbledon in 23 years, walked onto Court 16 yesterday morning and was greeted by only a few hands clapping.Henmania has yet to reach the U.S. Open.But that didn't stop Henman from demonstrating the same no-nonsense style that captured the hearts of the British and helped earn him a silver medal in doubles at the Olympics in Atlanta earlier this month.The slim right-hander made quick work of second-round opponent Doug Flach, 6-3, 6-4, 6-2, to move into the third round.
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By Diane Pucin and Diane Pucin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 29, 2004
WIMBLEDON, England - They played until dusk yesterday, Tim Henman and Mark Philippoussis. They served aces, 22 each, and double faults, rushed the net to make brilliant volleys, sometimes only to steer easy sitters abruptly left and into the stands. A wife, Lucy Henman, and a girlfriend, Delta Goodrem, pop singer and soap-opera actress, covered their faces with hands, with towels; bit lower lips; wiped sweat from their foreheads; stood to cheer; sighed in despair. And as always during Wimbledon, at least during the last decade, a nation rose to cheer, sat to groan, rose to cheer again as native son Henman provided a late-night Wimbledon thrill-fest.
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1996
NEW YORK -- At times, Stefan Edberg couldn't believe how his forehand volley deserted him, couldn't fathom why his timing was off.But as his match with England's Tim Henman moved through its second and into its third hours, Edberg's 30-year-old body loosened up, his volleys hit their marks, and the man who has been on the verge of saying farewell to his pro tennis career here for more than 10 days showed that his desire to put off his departure is strong.The...
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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 6, 2001
WIMBLEDON, England - Whatever happens today, Wimbledon should thank Goran Ivanisevic. He saved the tournament. He's the wild card who blew apart the stacked deck of 32 seeds. He's the big server who reminded the tennis world what real grass-court tennis looks like. He's the veteran who refused to quit, despite a bad shoulder and a plummeting career. He's the player who brought back heart and humor into an increasingly mercenary and mirthless game. And he's still magically and almost unbelievably hanging around in the men's semifinals.
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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 3, 1998
WIMBLEDON, England -- So, here's the forecast for today's men's semifinals at Wimbledon: tennis thunder followed by British lightning.No. 14-seed Goran Ivanisevic and No. 9 Richard Krajicek, two big-serving bashers who never pass up the chance to score an ace, will meet in one semifinal.And the other match will pit local favorite Tim Henman, the No. 12 seed and great British hope, in an against-all-odds confrontation with No. 1 seed and four-time Wimbledon champion Pete Sampras.The matches provide a study in contrasts and temperaments.
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By Diane Pucin and Diane Pucin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 1, 2004
WIMBLEDON, England - Henmania is over for another year, done in by a nerveless Croatian with a strong arm and indomitable will. Once again, as has been the case since 1936, there will not be a British winner of the men's Wimbledon title. Tim Henman, the fifth seed and an eight-time quarterfinalist, could not win a set from the unseeded but spirited Mario Ancic yesterday, suffering a 7-6 (5), 6-4, 6-2 loss in the quarterfinals. Ancic, who announced himself as a potential Wimbledon threat two years ago when he upset Roger Federer and earned the nickname "Super Mario," set Henman on his heels from the start in a triumph that left the crowd inside and outside Centre Court sad and subdued.
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By Diane Pucin and Diane Pucin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 29, 2004
WIMBLEDON, England - They played until dusk yesterday, Tim Henman and Mark Philippoussis. They served aces, 22 each, and double faults, rushed the net to make brilliant volleys, sometimes only to steer easy sitters abruptly left and into the stands. A wife, Lucy Henman, and a girlfriend, Delta Goodrem, pop singer and soap-opera actress, covered their faces with hands, with towels; bit lower lips; wiped sweat from their foreheads; stood to cheer; sighed in despair. And as always during Wimbledon, at least during the last decade, a nation rose to cheer, sat to groan, rose to cheer again as native son Henman provided a late-night Wimbledon thrill-fest.
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By Diane Pucin and Diane Pucin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 28, 2004
WIMBLEDON, England - Roger Federer is perfect for stately Wimbledon. His shirt is neatly pressed, his shorts crisp and tidy. His hair is long but always pulled back in a tight ponytail without a stray hanging loose. When he plays, the tennis is noiseless. He moves so lightly across the grass it seems as if the blades aren't being touched. Federer does not seem ruthless. He is a gentle man in his speech and with words. But in his first three rounds at Wimbledon, Federer has not lost a set, has not lost his serve, and has barely spent enough time on the court to have a good meal with a glass of wine and dessert.
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By Charles Bricker and Charles Bricker,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | June 5, 2004
PARIS - It was all flowing now for Argentina's Guillermo Coria, finally, 90 minutes into this fascinating ribbon road of a semifinal at the French Open. The passing shots, the quick-footed returns, the swift sprints to the drop shots and that breathtaking topspin forehand that dipped right at the laces of No. 9 seed Tim Henman's shoes as he swarmed, once more, in vain to the net in search of a winning volley. From a set and a break down and on the way to a monumental upset, Coria, perhaps the world's best clay-court player, spun off 13 consecutive games, ran into a frightening Henman rally in the fourth set, then got a lethal grip on the match in the homestretch and fired his way into the men's final, 3-6, 6-4, 6-0, 7-5, yesterday.
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2003
NEW YORK -- The U.S. Open is supposed to be all about youth this year. The old guard is retiring and it's time, say those in the know, for youth to make a stand. Leading the charge is American Andy Roddick, 20, who has been tabbed as the favorite here, coming off a spectacular summer in which he's won 20 of 21 matches. The only problem with that is there is one old guy here who isn't ready to join his peer group on the sidelines. Pete Sampras, Michael Chang and Jim Courier may all be retired now, but Andre Agassi is still on his game.
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2003
WASHINGTON - Tim Henman knew what he was up against yesterday afternoon in the final of the Legg Mason Tennis Classic. He had practiced with No. 4 Fernando Gonzalez before, played him in three matches and lost two. There were no surprises for Henman, only the opportunity to impose his game - something he hadn't been able to do before. Something he hadn't been able to do for more than a year as he first struggled with a bum shoulder and then began to rebuild his game after surgery in November.
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By Diane Pucin and Diane Pucin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 1, 2004
WIMBLEDON, England - Henmania is over for another year, done in by a nerveless Croatian with a strong arm and indomitable will. Once again, as has been the case since 1936, there will not be a British winner of the men's Wimbledon title. Tim Henman, the fifth seed and an eight-time quarterfinalist, could not win a set from the unseeded but spirited Mario Ancic yesterday, suffering a 7-6 (5), 6-4, 6-2 loss in the quarterfinals. Ancic, who announced himself as a potential Wimbledon threat two years ago when he upset Roger Federer and earned the nickname "Super Mario," set Henman on his heels from the start in a triumph that left the crowd inside and outside Centre Court sad and subdued.
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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN STAFF | July 1, 1999
WIMBLEDON, England -- They were coming to the end of their epic match, Jim Courier fading, Tim Henman lunging, Wimbledon coming to life yesterday as the rain clouds parted and the stars went back to play.For 4 hours and 30 minutes, in a tug of war that stretched over three days of sun, rain and wind, they had slugged it out, exposing their frailties and their hearts, reminding everyone why Centre Court remains the great tennis stage.And when it ended, there was Henman at the net, slamming a forehand volley off the scarred grass, the ball bouncing harmlessly away from Courier and the crowd roaring for the last British hope, roaring for an improbable Henman triumph, 4-6, 7-5, 7-5, 6-7 (5-7)
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2003
WASHINGTON - Someone should have found a warning label and made sure No. 1 seed Andre Agassi and No. 2 Andy Roddick saw it before their semifinal matches yesterday in the Legg Mason Tennis Classic. The label should have read: Beware of trouble in third-set tiebreakers. But there were no warnings, and the two Americans were eliminated in impressive and entertaining fashion. In the first of the two matches, Roddick was swept away by No. 10 seed Tim Henman, 1-6, 6-3, 7-6 (1), and then, last night, Agassi, who fought back to force the extra inning, was ousted by No. 4 Fernando Gonzalez, 3-6, 6-3, 7-6 (5)
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By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 3, 2003
WIMBLEDON, England - With Tim Henman the last remaining Englishman in the men's singles of Wimbledon, the British newspaper The Daily Mail posed a question that has been asked in tennis circles here for decades: "Why ARE we such losers?" This time around, the answer could be Sebastien Grosjean, a Frenchman whose brilliant returns of serve put him ahead of Henman, 7-6 (10-8), 3-6, 6-3, 1-2, when play was suspended for the fourth and final time yesterday by rain. Fans booed the decision to halt play overnight, but the lucky ones with tickets today should have a spectacular day of tennis, weather willing.
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