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Hemoglobin

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NEWS
By Los Angles Times | March 19, 1992
Colorado researchers have used genetic engineering to produce a form of artificial blood, representing a significant step in the search for a solution to the worldwide shortage of blood.Researchers from Somatogen in Boulder report today in the British journal Nature that they have begun human trials with the blood, which is produced in bacteria.The artificial blood is a genetically engineered form of hemoglobin, the complicated protein that -- enclosed in red blood cells -- carries oxygen from the lungs to tissues throughout the body.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | April 25, 2012
Patients may be getting blood transfusion too often during surgery, according to a new study by Johns Hopkins researchers. The study shows wide variation in the use of transfusions, and those who receive blood fare no better, and sometimes do worse. The problem may be that doctors don't have clear guidelines about when to use the expensive and scarce resource. “Over the past five years, studies have supported giving less blood than we used to, and our research shows that practitioners have not caught up,” said Dr. Steven M. Frank, leader of the study published in the journal Anesthesiology . “Blood conservation is one of the few areas in medicine where outcomes can be improved, risk reduced and costs saved all at the same time,” he said in a statement.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service & | June 16, 1991
Using genetic engineering techniques, biologists have developed pigs that produce human hemoglobin, the essential oxygen-carrying component of blood.Experts called the achievement a milestone in the effort to find a substitute for blood that could be used in all types of transfusions and might offer advantages over the donated blood now used.A blood substitute could be stored for months instead of weeks, would be free of any risk of human infection and could be transfused into anyone without the need for blood typing and matching.
SPORTS
February 15, 2006
A Brazilian bobsledder who tested positive for steroids in a pre-Olympic drug test became the first athlete sent home from the Turin Games for doping. Armando dos Santos failed the test in early January when a sample showed evidence of the steroid nandrolone, according to a statement posted on the Brazilian Olympic Committee's Web site. Dos Santos, a former hammer thrower, will be replaced on the four-man team by Claudinei Quirino - a silver medalist in the 400-meter relay at the 2000 Sydney Olympics.
BUSINESS
By Michael Pollick | January 20, 1992
Imagine if there were a good substitute for human blood -- something that would carry life-giving oxygen through the body.An ambulance crew could administer it in emergencies -- something that cannot be done now because the patient's blood must first be typed and cross-matched.A surgery candidate could avoid the ever-present risk of catching acquired immune deficiency syndrome or hepatitis through a blood transfusion.Imagine the benefits for society -- and the profits for the manufacturer and its shareholders.
BUSINESS
By Michael Pollick | January 20, 1992
Imagine if there were a good substitute for human blood -- something that would carry life-giving oxygen through the body.An ambulance crew could administer it in emergencies -- something that cannot be done now because the patient's blood must first be typed and cross-matched.A surgery candidate could avoid the ever-present risk of catching acquired immune deficiency syndrome or hepatitis through a blood transfusion.Imagine the benefits for society -- and the profits for the manufacturer and its shareholders.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | March 14, 1993
A substitute for blood that could be used in transfusions without risk of hepatitis or HIV infection could be available within five years, a federal scientist predicted yesterday."
SPORTS
February 15, 2006
A Brazilian bobsledder who tested positive for steroids in a pre-Olympic drug test became the first athlete sent home from the Turin Games for doping. Armando dos Santos failed the test in early January when a sample showed evidence of the steroid nandrolone, according to a statement posted on the Brazilian Olympic Committee's Web site. Dos Santos, a former hammer thrower, will be replaced on the four-man team by Claudinei Quirino - a silver medalist in the 400-meter relay at the 2000 Sydney Olympics.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | April 25, 2012
Patients may be getting blood transfusion too often during surgery, according to a new study by Johns Hopkins researchers. The study shows wide variation in the use of transfusions, and those who receive blood fare no better, and sometimes do worse. The problem may be that doctors don't have clear guidelines about when to use the expensive and scarce resource. “Over the past five years, studies have supported giving less blood than we used to, and our research shows that practitioners have not caught up,” said Dr. Steven M. Frank, leader of the study published in the journal Anesthesiology . “Blood conservation is one of the few areas in medicine where outcomes can be improved, risk reduced and costs saved all at the same time,” he said in a statement.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 14, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Preliminary tests suggest that a potential treatment for sickle cell disease and related blood disorders could attack the underlying cause of the illnesses for the first time, say researchers.In a small group of patients, they said yesterday, treatment with a naturally occurring chemical stimulated production of a kind of hemoglobin in the blood that is known to benefit people with sickle cell disease or beta thalassemia, which are related inherited anemias.But they said longer studies with more patients were needed to see whether the treatment produced the expected clinical benefit.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | March 14, 1993
A substitute for blood that could be used in transfusions without risk of hepatitis or HIV infection could be available within five years, a federal scientist predicted yesterday."
NEWS
By Los Angles Times | March 19, 1992
Colorado researchers have used genetic engineering to produce a form of artificial blood, representing a significant step in the search for a solution to the worldwide shortage of blood.Researchers from Somatogen in Boulder report today in the British journal Nature that they have begun human trials with the blood, which is produced in bacteria.The artificial blood is a genetically engineered form of hemoglobin, the complicated protein that -- enclosed in red blood cells -- carries oxygen from the lungs to tissues throughout the body.
BUSINESS
By Michael Pollick | January 20, 1992
Imagine if there were a good substitute for human blood -- something that would carry life-giving oxygen through the body.An ambulance crew could administer it in emergencies -- something that cannot be done now because the patient's blood must first be typed and cross-matched.A surgery candidate could avoid the ever-present risk of catching acquired immune deficiency syndrome or hepatitis through a blood transfusion.Imagine the benefits for society -- and the profits for the manufacturer and its shareholders.
BUSINESS
By Michael Pollick | January 20, 1992
Imagine if there were a good substitute for human blood -- something that would carry life-giving oxygen through the body.An ambulance crew could administer it in emergencies -- something that cannot be done now because the patient's blood must first be typed and cross-matched.A surgery candidate could avoid the ever-present risk of catching acquired immune deficiency syndrome or hepatitis through a blood transfusion.Imagine the benefits for society -- and the profits for the manufacturer and its shareholders.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service & | June 16, 1991
Using genetic engineering techniques, biologists have developed pigs that produce human hemoglobin, the essential oxygen-carrying component of blood.Experts called the achievement a milestone in the effort to find a substitute for blood that could be used in all types of transfusions and might offer advantages over the donated blood now used.A blood substitute could be stored for months instead of weeks, would be free of any risk of human infection and could be transfused into anyone without the need for blood typing and matching.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 20, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Researchers have discovered that a drug being examined as a cancer therapy may also turn out to be a non-toxic treatment for sickle cell anemia and related blood disorders.Scientists at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and the National Cancer Institute said yesterday that the drug, which is commonly used for rare metabolic disorders in children, has been found to increase production of a fetal type of hemoglobin that is beneficial to sickle cell patients.The researchers said they know of no other drug that produces such a high level of fetal hemoglobin, and they are excited about its potential for treating patients who suffer from inherited anemias.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 7, 1996
I am 16 years old and have been told I have sickle cell trait. What is it and will I get sick?All human red blood cells contain hemoglobin, a protein that binds with oxygen and "carries" the oxygen to all parts of the body.Each hemoglobin molecule has two alpha and two beta chains. The production of these chains is controlled by an individual's genes. An individual has two genes (called beta globin genes) that control production of the beta chains, one from his/her mother and one from his/her father.
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