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By Ginger Thompson | October 31, 1991
Although they are thousands of miles away, the members of the Hemlock Society of Maryland feel that the struggle in Washington state to legalize doctor-assisted suicide is their fight, too.They have sent checks to support the "Yes on 119" campaign. They have made telephone calls to friends and relatives in Washington state, asking them to vote for the referendum. They are taking notes on the strategy used by Initiative 119 proponents and have begun laying the foundation for a similar effort here.
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NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 9, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In wheelchairs, on crutches, with guide dogs, the demonstrators gathered outside the Supreme Court yesterday, shouting that they fear they will be pushed to end their lives should physician-assisted suicide become legal."
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FEATURES
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,Universal Press Syndicate | September 2, 1991
Given the pervasive fear of a drawn-out death, perhaps it's not surprising that a how-to book on suicide has shot to the top of the New York Times best-seller list for hardcover advice books."
NEWS
By Sara Engram | April 7, 1996
ANYONE WHO has cared for a terminally ill patient or even visited a nursing home knows that the process of dying is rarely cost-effective.And anyone familiar with the market pressures changing the landscape of American health care knows that cost-effectiveness now drives more medical decisions than we like to admit.Therein lies one of the dilemmas of physician-assisted suicide -- one not touched on in two recent decisions from federal appellate courts overturning long-standing bans on the practice.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 9, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In wheelchairs, on crutches, with guide dogs, the demonstrators gathered outside the Supreme Court yesterday, shouting that they fear they will be pushed to end their lives should physician-assisted suicide become legal."
NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Evening Sun Staff | November 6, 1991
As two retirement community residents finished dinner, they fell into an argument over a ballot proposal that went on to defeat in Washington state that would have allowed doctors to help terminally ill patients kill themselves."
NEWS
May 1, 1994
Hemlock Society: Empower the DyingIssues around death and dying have been very much in the news and it seemed appropriate to acquaint the readership with the Hemlock Society, which has both a Maryland chapter and a National Capital area chapter.Hemlock is an educational organization which hopes to enlighten people regarding end-of-life issues and choices. While members hold a variety of personal views and beliefs, generally we agree that death must be as humane as possible and that the dying person be empowered to make those decisions required at the end of life.
FEATURES
By Gerri Kobren | October 29, 1991
Suicide -- it has always been a word spoken in hushed whispers with averted eyes. Not something respectable people talked about. Certainly not anything the medical profession would become involved with.Then came Michigan physician Jack Kevorkian, his suicide machine, and the well-publicized death he abetted last year for an Alzheimer's patient. And then came Marjorie Wantz and Sherry Miller, two women with painful but non-terminal diseases who last week took their own lives in his presence.
NEWS
By Sara Engram | April 7, 1996
ANYONE WHO has cared for a terminally ill patient or even visited a nursing home knows that the process of dying is rarely cost-effective.And anyone familiar with the market pressures changing the landscape of American health care knows that cost-effectiveness now drives more medical decisions than we like to admit.Therein lies one of the dilemmas of physician-assisted suicide -- one not touched on in two recent decisions from federal appellate courts overturning long-standing bans on the practice.
NEWS
August 28, 1997
Janet Good, 73, an outspoken right-to-die activist and ally of assisted suicide proponent Dr. Jack Kevorkian, died Tuesday in Farmington Hills, Mich., after a long battle with pancreatic cancer.Geoffrey Fieger, Dr. Kevorkian's attorney, said she died peacefully. It was not known whether Dr. Kevorkian was present.Ms. Good had been active in the state's right-to-die movement and founded the Hemlock Society of Michigan.Pub Date: 8/28/97
NEWS
May 1, 1994
Hemlock Society: Empower the DyingIssues around death and dying have been very much in the news and it seemed appropriate to acquaint the readership with the Hemlock Society, which has both a Maryland chapter and a National Capital area chapter.Hemlock is an educational organization which hopes to enlighten people regarding end-of-life issues and choices. While members hold a variety of personal views and beliefs, generally we agree that death must be as humane as possible and that the dying person be empowered to make those decisions required at the end of life.
NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Evening Sun Staff | November 6, 1991
As two retirement community residents finished dinner, they fell into an argument over a ballot proposal that went on to defeat in Washington state that would have allowed doctors to help terminally ill patients kill themselves."
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson | October 31, 1991
Although they are thousands of miles away, the members of the Hemlock Society of Maryland feel that the struggle in Washington state to legalize doctor-assisted suicide is their fight, too.They have sent checks to support the "Yes on 119" campaign. They have made telephone calls to friends and relatives in Washington state, asking them to vote for the referendum. They are taking notes on the strategy used by Initiative 119 proponents and have begun laying the foundation for a similar effort here.
FEATURES
By Gerri Kobren | October 29, 1991
Suicide -- it has always been a word spoken in hushed whispers with averted eyes. Not something respectable people talked about. Certainly not anything the medical profession would become involved with.Then came Michigan physician Jack Kevorkian, his suicide machine, and the well-publicized death he abetted last year for an Alzheimer's patient. And then came Marjorie Wantz and Sherry Miller, two women with painful but non-terminal diseases who last week took their own lives in his presence.
FEATURES
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,Universal Press Syndicate | September 2, 1991
Given the pervasive fear of a drawn-out death, perhaps it's not surprising that a how-to book on suicide has shot to the top of the New York Times best-seller list for hardcover advice books."
NEWS
February 3, 1992
Dr. Paul F. Guerin, a Cockeysville pathologist who worked at Franklin Square Hospital for 24 years, died Jan. 23 at the University of Maryland Medical Center in Baltimore after a long respiratory illness.Services for Dr. Guerin, who was 71, will be at 4 p.m. Saturday at Towson Unitarian Universalist Church, 1710 Dulaney Valley Road in Lutherville.A native of Erie, Pa., Dr. Guerin graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1945 and served in the Army Medical Corps from 1946 to 1948.
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