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By Woody Hochswender and Woody Hochswender,N.Y. Times News Service | October 30, 1991
PARIS - Pulled by some mysterious, irresistible force, hemlines have been falling.Is it gravity? Or fate? Why now, you say, when women are just beginning to feel comfortable in the shorter lengths?Indeed, store buyers and fashion editors in Europe for the spring showings were divided over the new silhouette. Even the designers seemed confused. This was the season of the great compromise hemline.Fashion is a little bit like trading futures: the clothes shown in Paris and Milan, Italy, in the past month are for spring delivery.
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NEWS
June 3, 2001
Carrying the colors Love the new straw totes, but don't quite trust the loose weave to hold small things? Line them with scarves, says scarf designer ECHO. Self-serving as the suggestion may be for ECHO, it's not a bad idea. It probably will keep your keys in the bag, but why stop there? A splash of color peeking from a basic black shoulder bag could be kind of nice, too -- like tissue paper inside a gift box. You could even change it to match your outfit, so you're always coordinated and haven't spent a fortune on a rainbow of purses.
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FEATURES
By N.Y. Times News Service | November 7, 1990
When it comes to hemlines, the votes are already in and tabulated. The short one wins.While the showings of new fashions in Milan, Paris and New York have set guidelines for some interesting, possibly controversial, changes to come, they were all clear on one point. The hemline above the top of the knee and then some is the overwhelming choice.A couple of trend-setting designers did show a very few longer skirts. But these were red herrings: The hems of everything else in their collections were way up there.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2000
Call them generation X or Y or simply Next. Their tastes in fashion, food, home furnishings and floral design are starting to influence all of us. The youngest of them think "retro" means early '90s, and they are comfortable with global culture and the latest technology in a way the baby boom generation can never be. You probably don't recognize their names, but these young stylemakers may someday be Baltimore's next Rita St. Clair or Ruth Shaw....
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Fashion Editor | November 11, 1993
Short and sweet. Sheer and sexy. That's how American designers plan to dress women next spring. The mood is young and frisky, to match the circus atmosphere which prevailed in the big tents in New York's Bryant Park where designers made their first collective effort to put the American fashion industry on the global map.They say, whoever They are, that hemlines rise with the economy. If last week's shows were any indication, we are in for a business boom-boom.Designers had an almost unanimous show of thighs to vote out long and bring in short.
FEATURES
By T.J. Howard and T.J. Howard,Chicago Tribune | September 4, 1991
This fall, coats don't mean a thing if they ain't got that swing.Swing coats reinforce the trend toward shorter hemlines as well as reinstating motion in clothing seen in the softer fabrics, pleated skirts and fluted hemlines that are out in force for fall. And with a swing coat, a woman gains the drama of a cape without the affectation.Swing coats started to show up last year, but done primarily in black, they hung quietly on coat racks. This year, swing coats are virtually impossible to overlook.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | June 13, 1991
Fashion flirted with hemlines, toyed with dresses and re-established pants as major players of the season. But the strongest message from the fall shows in Paris, London, New York and Milan, Italy, was an affirmation of the jacket as the heavy hitter in the current fashion scene.Sure, there are changes. Shoulder pads are no longer as formidable as the ones football players wear. Jackets are not so oversized that they could accommodate a couple of sweaters and a wool shirt underneath. Some have pronounced curves, as waistlines nip snugly above jutting or gently flared peplums.
NEWS
June 3, 2001
Carrying the colors Love the new straw totes, but don't quite trust the loose weave to hold small things? Line them with scarves, says scarf designer ECHO. Self-serving as the suggestion may be for ECHO, it's not a bad idea. It probably will keep your keys in the bag, but why stop there? A splash of color peeking from a basic black shoulder bag could be kind of nice, too -- like tissue paper inside a gift box. You could even change it to match your outfit, so you're always coordinated and haven't spent a fortune on a rainbow of purses.
NEWS
By Brian Sullam | December 29, 1996
WHEN I read Anne Arundel County's new school dress code and heard that some students were unhappy because it might restrict their "freedom of expression," their lament sounded all too familiar.Three decades ago when I attended high school, my friends and I hated our own school dress code with equal vehemence. We felt it was restrictive and oppressive.We protested that the code limited our ability to express ourselves through our clothing in an era when self-expression was of paramount importance.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | April 8, 1994
A trend is a trend is a trend. And fall's fashion trends are emerging with the daffodils as top designers unveil their collections in temporary tents in Bryant Park in Manhattan's garment district.Poet Gertrude Stein, whose bronze statue has been covered over with canvas to form the models' changing area, might have difficulty defining so succinctly the yards of fake fur and plastic evening dresses parading the runway.Donna Karan was the first powerhouse designer to show in the 800-seat big top with her secondary DKNY line.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,SUN FASHION EDITOR | October 15, 1998
When is a skirt not just a skirt?When Ally McBeal wears it.Then it symbolizes many things: Feminism run amok. Bad fashion. Unbridled sexuality. Anorexia.Her minis -- which have crept up an inch this season -- take center stage on "Ally McBeal" on Monday (Fox, 9 p.m.) when the title character's penchant for thigh-high style lands her in contempt of court.But it's not just Ally's apparel that gets fans, critics and TV judges talking. The very existence of this strange single lawyer -- and her offbeat world of unisex bathrooms, dancing babies and colleagues nicknamed Biscuit -- seems to stimulate, aggravate, entertain and inspire.
NEWS
By Brian Sullam | December 29, 1996
WHEN I read Anne Arundel County's new school dress code and heard that some students were unhappy because it might restrict their "freedom of expression," their lament sounded all too familiar.Three decades ago when I attended high school, my friends and I hated our own school dress code with equal vehemence. We felt it was restrictive and oppressive.We protested that the code limited our ability to express ourselves through our clothing in an era when self-expression was of paramount importance.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | April 4, 1995
New York -- It's fall fashion week here. You can tell by the falling hemlines -- and the hype. Thousands of buyers, press, video crews and groupies have blown into town to see American designers showing their winter wear. Some of them are wearing the new knee-length, for now.That could change by the end of the week after they've seen everything from hot pants to father-of-the-bride morning coats masquerading as ballgowns.Fashion emperatrix Donna Karan cut the cutaway into everything from hip men's jackets to sweeping evening gowns for her DKNY show, which opened the week of fashion frenzy.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | April 8, 1994
A trend is a trend is a trend. And fall's fashion trends are emerging with the daffodils as top designers unveil their collections in temporary tents in Bryant Park in Manhattan's garment district.Poet Gertrude Stein, whose bronze statue has been covered over with canvas to form the models' changing area, might have difficulty defining so succinctly the yards of fake fur and plastic evening dresses parading the runway.Donna Karan was the first powerhouse designer to show in the 800-seat big top with her secondary DKNY line.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Fashion Editor | November 11, 1993
Short and sweet. Sheer and sexy. That's how American designers plan to dress women next spring. The mood is young and frisky, to match the circus atmosphere which prevailed in the big tents in New York's Bryant Park where designers made their first collective effort to put the American fashion industry on the global map.They say, whoever They are, that hemlines rise with the economy. If last week's shows were any indication, we are in for a business boom-boom.Designers had an almost unanimous show of thighs to vote out long and bring in short.
FEATURES
By San Francisco Chronicle | April 2, 1993
NEW YORK -- If a designer gets a shot at dressing the first or second lady, what happens next? It depends.Sarah Phillips, 37, who designed Hillary Rodham Clinton's fairy-tale lavender/blue inaugural ball gown, can't afford to finance a fall collection. She thought she had a backer, but he fell through."I'm missing a major market, which is really a drag," said Ms. Phillips, who hopes to have a collection for the holidays.Steven Stolman, 34, who designed several dresses for Tipper Gore to wear to inaugural galas, is in even worse shape.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | April 4, 1995
New York -- It's fall fashion week here. You can tell by the falling hemlines -- and the hype. Thousands of buyers, press, video crews and groupies have blown into town to see American designers showing their winter wear. Some of them are wearing the new knee-length, for now.That could change by the end of the week after they've seen everything from hot pants to father-of-the-bride morning coats masquerading as ballgowns.Fashion emperatrix Donna Karan cut the cutaway into everything from hip men's jackets to sweeping evening gowns for her DKNY show, which opened the week of fashion frenzy.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2000
Call them generation X or Y or simply Next. Their tastes in fashion, food, home furnishings and floral design are starting to influence all of us. The youngest of them think "retro" means early '90s, and they are comfortable with global culture and the latest technology in a way the baby boom generation can never be. You probably don't recognize their names, but these young stylemakers may someday be Baltimore's next Rita St. Clair or Ruth Shaw....
FEATURES
By Genevieve Buck and Genevieve Buck,Chicago Tribune | March 25, 1992
Expect to see more long skirts around this summer, especially soft and floaty ones.Look forward to even more long clothes next fall, probably skinny, stretchy, ankle-grazing types.But don't look for all hemlines to come crashing down, for longer lengths to dominate the fashion scene, for women to toss out everything they own for the sake of being in fashion with long skirts."There will never again be a 1947," says Nordstrom's corporate fashion director, Sarah Davies, referring to Christian Dior's revolutionary "New Look" that caused skirts to plunge almost overnight.
FEATURES
By Woody Hochswender and Woody Hochswender,N.Y. Times News Service | October 30, 1991
PARIS - Pulled by some mysterious, irresistible force, hemlines have been falling.Is it gravity? Or fate? Why now, you say, when women are just beginning to feel comfortable in the shorter lengths?Indeed, store buyers and fashion editors in Europe for the spring showings were divided over the new silhouette. Even the designers seemed confused. This was the season of the great compromise hemline.Fashion is a little bit like trading futures: the clothes shown in Paris and Milan, Italy, in the past month are for spring delivery.
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