Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHelter Skelter
IN THE NEWS

Helter Skelter

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1996
Choices, choices. You can watch baseball on Fox, reruns on the networks (including "3rd Rock From the Sun," "The Drew Carey Show" and two episodes of "The Nanny") or take a nap in preparation for the evening's best offering, a late-night movie on TBS."Wings" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Antonio (Tony Shalhoub) meets a beautiful woman (Tracy Scoggins) after she calls the suicide hot line he's manning. When you're Antonio, you take your dates where you can get them. NBC."NewsRadio" (9 p.m.-9: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11)
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cassandra Berube | November 26, 2012
Where can a serial killer feel safe? While that isn't a question I would normally ask, seeing as serial killers such as Dexter have proven themselves capable of handling any surprises that come their way, the question arises tonight. Out comes Dexter's more sensitive side, or you could say, his human side. And who would have thought that Hannah, a fellow serial killer, would bring it out. She is kidnapped by Isaac, looking to extract a favor out of Dexter before either of them wins their deadly battle.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Scott Collins and Scott Collins,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 25, 2004
When conservatives raised a ruckus last year over The Reagans, CBS ended up dumping the TV movie about the former first family. Then Janet Jackson's impromptu strip during CBS' Super Bowl halftime show re-ignited a national debate about broadcast indecency. Now the network finds itself with another potentially troublesome project, this one involving mass murderer Charles Manson. One of CBS' main events for the critical May ratings sweep is Helter Skelter, a new three-hour adaptation of former Los Angeles County Deputy District Attorney Vincent Bugliosi's best seller about the 1969 Manson murders.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 22, 2004
Everyone knows the place to find quality drama on Sunday night is HBO. When The Sopranos ends in two weeks, back comes Six Feet Under, followed by The Wire - and so on. But what about the 60 percent of TV homes that don't subscribe to the costliest of the premium pay cable services? Is there anything for those 95 million viewers? The happy answer, at least for two nights, is yes. Tomorrow night, CBS begins airing a two-part miniseries called Reversible Errors and starring William H. Macy.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | March 26, 1994
If you have cable, there's a lot worth watching tonight. If you don't, there isn't.* "NCAA basketball tournament" (3:30 p.m.-conclusion, WBAL, Channel 11) -- When this afternoon's games are over, the NCAA will have 50 percent of its Final Four in place. CBS.* "Figure Skating World Championships" (8 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Tonya Harding's plea bargain prevented her from competing in this contest. When network executives scheduled prime-time coverage of tonight's women's finals, undoubtedly the visions of post-Olympics glory, or ratings, danced in their heads.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Eric R. Danton and Eric R. Danton,Hartford Courant | April 4, 2004
DJ Danger Mouse was wrong, from a legal perspective, to remix vocals from Jay-Z's The Black Album with samples culled from The Beatles, also known as The White Album. That doesn't change the fact that the resulting Grey Album is the best idea to hit rap music in a long time. Danger Mouse (also known as Brian Burton) says that every note and beat of the 12 remixed tunes comes from The White Album, and he did an amazing job matching up Jay-Z's rhymes with the Beatles' songs. It's a wonder that no one else has used samples of "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" or "Helter Skelter" -- they're perfect foundations for the flow and cadence of rap lyrics.
FEATURES
By Richard C. Paddock and Richard C. Paddock,Los Angeles Times | August 12, 1994
Even now as he sits isolated in one of California's toughest prisons, Charles Manson has gained a new mystique as a kind of criminal anti-hero.This week, on the 25th anniversary of the 1969 murders of actress Sharon Tate and her friends, people play Manson's songs, peddle his writings and sell his likeness on T-shirts and dresses for girls. Near the prison, at least one follower has taken residence, waiting to see Charlie again.Last year, Guns N' Roses recorded a song Manson wrote before the murders -- "Look at Your Game Girl."
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | January 29, 1993
In just about every snapshot taken of me since reaching adulthood, I seem to be wearing this harsh, just-out-of-San-Quentin look.L In each of these snapshots, there is an attempt at a smile.But invariably the smile is captured on film as a grimace. And the grimace causes my eyes to disappear into twin slits, creating a vaguely menacing appearance.The total effect is of a man who, seconds before the picture was snapped, threw the last shovelful of dirt on the shallow grave of someone he'd just strangled.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | November 22, 1998
It's one of the best-known recordings of the rock era, yet almost everyone gets its name wrong. And even though it's widely acknowledged as a classic, even its most fervent supporters admit they'd happily trim a few songs from the album."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 22, 2004
Everyone knows the place to find quality drama on Sunday night is HBO. When The Sopranos ends in two weeks, back comes Six Feet Under, followed by The Wire - and so on. But what about the 60 percent of TV homes that don't subscribe to the costliest of the premium pay cable services? Is there anything for those 95 million viewers? The happy answer, at least for two nights, is yes. Tomorrow night, CBS begins airing a two-part miniseries called Reversible Errors and starring William H. Macy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Eric R. Danton and Eric R. Danton,Hartford Courant | April 4, 2004
DJ Danger Mouse was wrong, from a legal perspective, to remix vocals from Jay-Z's The Black Album with samples culled from The Beatles, also known as The White Album. That doesn't change the fact that the resulting Grey Album is the best idea to hit rap music in a long time. Danger Mouse (also known as Brian Burton) says that every note and beat of the 12 remixed tunes comes from The White Album, and he did an amazing job matching up Jay-Z's rhymes with the Beatles' songs. It's a wonder that no one else has used samples of "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" or "Helter Skelter" -- they're perfect foundations for the flow and cadence of rap lyrics.
FEATURES
By Scott Collins and Scott Collins,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 25, 2004
When conservatives raised a ruckus last year over The Reagans, CBS ended up dumping the TV movie about the former first family. Then Janet Jackson's impromptu strip during CBS' Super Bowl halftime show re-ignited a national debate about broadcast indecency. Now the network finds itself with another potentially troublesome project, this one involving mass murderer Charles Manson. One of CBS' main events for the critical May ratings sweep is Helter Skelter, a new three-hour adaptation of former Los Angeles County Deputy District Attorney Vincent Bugliosi's best seller about the 1969 Manson murders.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | November 22, 1998
It's one of the best-known recordings of the rock era, yet almost everyone gets its name wrong. And even though it's widely acknowledged as a classic, even its most fervent supporters admit they'd happily trim a few songs from the album."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1996
Choices, choices. You can watch baseball on Fox, reruns on the networks (including "3rd Rock From the Sun," "The Drew Carey Show" and two episodes of "The Nanny") or take a nap in preparation for the evening's best offering, a late-night movie on TBS."Wings" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Antonio (Tony Shalhoub) meets a beautiful woman (Tracy Scoggins) after she calls the suicide hot line he's manning. When you're Antonio, you take your dates where you can get them. NBC."NewsRadio" (9 p.m.-9: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11)
FEATURES
By Richard C. Paddock and Richard C. Paddock,Los Angeles Times | August 12, 1994
Even now as he sits isolated in one of California's toughest prisons, Charles Manson has gained a new mystique as a kind of criminal anti-hero.This week, on the 25th anniversary of the 1969 murders of actress Sharon Tate and her friends, people play Manson's songs, peddle his writings and sell his likeness on T-shirts and dresses for girls. Near the prison, at least one follower has taken residence, waiting to see Charlie again.Last year, Guns N' Roses recorded a song Manson wrote before the murders -- "Look at Your Game Girl."
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | March 26, 1994
If you have cable, there's a lot worth watching tonight. If you don't, there isn't.* "NCAA basketball tournament" (3:30 p.m.-conclusion, WBAL, Channel 11) -- When this afternoon's games are over, the NCAA will have 50 percent of its Final Four in place. CBS.* "Figure Skating World Championships" (8 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Tonya Harding's plea bargain prevented her from competing in this contest. When network executives scheduled prime-time coverage of tonight's women's finals, undoubtedly the visions of post-Olympics glory, or ratings, danced in their heads.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cassandra Berube | November 26, 2012
Where can a serial killer feel safe? While that isn't a question I would normally ask, seeing as serial killers such as Dexter have proven themselves capable of handling any surprises that come their way, the question arises tonight. Out comes Dexter's more sensitive side, or you could say, his human side. And who would have thought that Hannah, a fellow serial killer, would bring it out. She is kidnapped by Isaac, looking to extract a favor out of Dexter before either of them wins their deadly battle.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | June 28, 1991
A viewing of five of the seven shows gathered under the umbrella of the Columbia Festival of the Arts' visual arts component leads to the conclusion that those responsible for the festival ought seriously to rethink this component of it. If visual art.Consider: The new element of this festival, a visual arts competition show, had restrictions on allowable art (such as no nudity) that caused the resignation of a juror. The show itself was on the whole wearisomely ultra-conservative and banal, and it ended up in a space where it had to close last weekend, before the festival even opened.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | January 29, 1993
In just about every snapshot taken of me since reaching adulthood, I seem to be wearing this harsh, just-out-of-San-Quentin look.L In each of these snapshots, there is an attempt at a smile.But invariably the smile is captured on film as a grimace. And the grimace causes my eyes to disappear into twin slits, creating a vaguely menacing appearance.The total effect is of a man who, seconds before the picture was snapped, threw the last shovelful of dirt on the shallow grave of someone he'd just strangled.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | June 28, 1991
A viewing of five of the seven shows gathered under the umbrella of the Columbia Festival of the Arts' visual arts component leads to the conclusion that those responsible for the festival ought seriously to rethink this component of it. If visual art.Consider: The new element of this festival, a visual arts competition show, had restrictions on allowable art (such as no nudity) that caused the resignation of a juror. The show itself was on the whole wearisomely ultra-conservative and banal, and it ended up in a space where it had to close last weekend, before the festival even opened.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.