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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
Talk about the magic of television. HBO's "Veep" won an Art Directors Guild Award over the weekend for a most impressive act of TV transformation. Led by production designer Jim Gloster, Baltimore's Engineers Club and Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport were made to stand in for Helsinki, Finland, in a Season 2 episode titled "Helsinki. " The episode features Vice President Selina Meyer (Julia Louis-Dreyfus) on a disastrous diplomatic trip to Finland.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
Talk about the magic of television. HBO's "Veep" won an Art Directors Guild Award over the weekend for a most impressive act of TV transformation. Led by production designer Jim Gloster, Baltimore's Engineers Club and Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport were made to stand in for Helsinki, Finland, in a Season 2 episode titled "Helsinki. " The episode features Vice President Selina Meyer (Julia Louis-Dreyfus) on a disastrous diplomatic trip to Finland.
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FEATURES
By Antero Pietila and Ulla Karki | March 20, 1997
Knee injuries and heart problems aside, if Bill Clinton and Boris Yeltsin really want to accomplish something during their two-day summit in Helsinki, perhaps they should do things the way Finnish presidents do.That is, negotiate in a sauna bath -- while beating one another with birch twigs. The first one to retreat from the heat -- usually to roll in the snow or dive into the frozen sea -- is the loser. Sort of a small-scale Cold War, with limited casualties.That's just one of the unique pleasures a visit to Finland's capital offers the world's two most powerful tourists today and tomorrow.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown | February 7, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin has been named co-chairman of the Helsinki Commission, his office announced yesterday. An independent agency of the U.S. government, the commission helps to develop U.S. policy for the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe. The OSCE, which consists of the United States and 55 other countries in North America, Europe and Asia, focuses on security, economic and environmental cooperation, human rights and humanitarian concerns. "I believe that everyone - both in America and around the world - deserves to live with dignity, free of oppression and discrimination," Cardin said in a statement.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 10, 1990
HELSINKI, Finland -- Her husband has never officially declared an end to the Cold War, but first lady Barbara Bush did it for him yesterday by embracing the Soviet Union as part of the "free world."Meeting briefly with reporters while she and Raisa Gorbachev were touring the Helsinki University Library, Mrs. Bush was asked if she thought it possible to find a peaceful solution to the Persian Gulf crisis."Yes, there is a peaceful solution," she said. "I hope our husbands, along with the rest of the free world, will work hard to make peace.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | March 19, 1997
Helsinki was to pit our vigorous secure president against one of doubtful personal and political health, but turns out t'other way round.Tony Lake was shot down at the Intelligence Committee and nobody can tell if the CIA was the gunner or the target or, as sometimes happens, both.Britain will show us how to hold an election in six weeks on a shoestring with almost everyone voting, but we won't learn.Zaire today, gone tomorrow.Pub Date: 3/19/97
NEWS
By New York Times | September 10, 1990
HELSINKI, Finland -- It was hard to believe, watching the two presidents boast about their new cooperation at the United Nations and at their three summit meetings, that it was less than two years ago that the Soviet Union still had an aura of evil for the presidential candidate George Bush.While their differences became clearer after seven hours of talks at the Presidential Palace, Bush did not seem disappointed. Rather, he seemed swept away by the symbolism of Mikhail S. Gorbachev's smile.
NEWS
By ANTERO PIETILA | August 7, 1994
Antskog, Finland. -- The magical moment comes around midnight.At these northern latitudes, the summer sun may have set an hour ago, but a mirror-calm lake still reflects a reddish afterglow. Everything is quiet, except for an occasional call of a distant loon.In a few months, darkness will prevail. But in late July the night still never quite arrives. By 2 a.m., the promise of another day will appear on the cloudless eastern sky.I am on a sentimental journey, about an hour's drive from Helsinki.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 16, 2002
HELSINKI, Finland - Police said yesterday that they had detained four Finns, three of them teen-agers, in connection with the bombing at a crowded shopping mall Friday that killed seven people and wounded as many as 100 in a suburb of Helsinki. The four are not believed to have taken part in the bombing, which took place in Vantaa, about seven miles north of Helsinki, during the shopping surge late Friday afternoon. Rather, police said, the suspects may have provided bomb-making advice over the Internet to Petri Gerdt, a 19-year-old chemistry student who was killed in the blast and is suspected of being the bomber.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 19, 1997
WASHINGTON -- At a brief but important summit, President Clinton and Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin meet in the Finnish capital of Helsinki tomorrow and Friday for talks that may help determine whether the West and Russia will enter the next century as adversaries or friends.Even if no major agreements are reached, the two-day session on the Baltic coast will begin to chart a course for the long-term military and security relationship of the two former Cold War enemies.The leaders will try to bridge a deep divide over the planned expansion of the U. S.-dominated NATO alliance, end an impasse over reductions in their Cold War-era nuclear arsenals and defuse a growing disagreement over missile defenses.
SPORTS
By Elliott Denman and Elliott Denman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 8, 2005
HELSINKI, Finland - Relax. Stay cool. Focus. Be strong. James Carter will tell himself all these things. Over and over and over. And over and over and over again. Now until 9:25 p.m. tomorrow. And then, with all his body forces in alignment, he'll step out onto the track at historic Olympic Stadium, site of the 1952 Games, fully armed for a run at the first major Games medal - maybe even a gold one - of his storied track and field career. The 27-year-old Mervo and Hampton University product and two-time U.S. Olympian heads into the men's 400-meter hurdles final at the 10th world championships with everything going for him. He overpowered the field in his semifinal race yesterday, blazing past three men - one of them reigning Olympic champion Felix Sanchez of the Dominican Republic - over the 10th and final 3-foot barrier and cruising home to victory in 47.78 seconds.
SPORTS
By Elliott Denman and Elliott Denman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 7, 2005
HELSINKI, Finland - James Carter's bid for a world championships medal is off to a sizzling start. The 27-year-old former Mervo Tech and Hampton University star has been a jetsetter on track and field's professional circuit for six years. He's been to two Olympic Games. He's been to one previous edition of his sport's biennial world championships. But he's yet to collect a big-games medal. Well, the run of frustration may soon be over. After breezing through his opening-round heat in the 400-meter hurdles at the 10th world championships in 49.05 seconds yesterday at Olympic Stadium, Carter declared himself "as ready as I've ever been."
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2005
Joel Brown is no stranger to crowds. As a member of the Woodlawn track and field program between 1996 and 1999, Brown regularly drew scores of onlookers eager for a glimpse of the six-time state champion in the hurdles. When he was at Ohio State, he competed in the NCAA and national championships and earned a spot in the U.S. Olympic trials last year. But when Brown traveled to Cuxhaven, Germany, for a meet less than a month ago, he was stunned to see what he estimated to be about 20,000 people sitting in the stands.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 16, 2002
HELSINKI, Finland - Police said yesterday that they had detained four Finns, three of them teen-agers, in connection with the bombing at a crowded shopping mall Friday that killed seven people and wounded as many as 100 in a suburb of Helsinki. The four are not believed to have taken part in the bombing, which took place in Vantaa, about seven miles north of Helsinki, during the shopping surge late Friday afternoon. Rather, police said, the suspects may have provided bomb-making advice over the Internet to Petri Gerdt, a 19-year-old chemistry student who was killed in the blast and is suspected of being the bomber.
NEWS
By Antero Pietila and Antero Pietila,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2001
TALLINN, Estonia - It takes just 18 minutes to get here by helicopter from Helsinki, Finland. But only a fool would take a cramped helicopter, say visiting Finns. They pack a fleet of car ferries, stream here by the thousands every day, and have turned the visa-free, 90-minute crossings into an increasingly essential part of their household economies. "How often do I come here? I think about making the trip every time I need a haircut," said Lauri Aalto, a retired teacher. "The cost difference alone pays for the ferry."
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | May 25, 2001
WHILE THE press focuses on the escalation of killing and retaliation in and around Israel, it mostly ignores the fires of hate against Jews that are being stoked to ensure that violence continues. The official Palestinian Authority daily newspaper printed an article on May 16 that said, "It is proper that the call to hate Israel continue to be worn on the chest of every Arab (and) that it should be regarded as a measurement of patriotism." The article notes approvingly that the owner of an Egyptian pharmacy had posted a sign that said "no dogs or Jews," and concludes, "The position of hate is natural."
NEWS
By Antero Pietila and Antero Pietila,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2001
TALLINN, Estonia - It takes just 18 minutes to get here by helicopter from Helsinki, Finland. But only a fool would take a cramped helicopter, say visiting Finns. They pack a fleet of car ferries, stream here by the thousands every day, and have turned the visa-free, 90-minute crossings into an increasingly essential part of their household economies. "How often do I come here? I think about making the trip every time I need a haircut," said Lauri Aalto, a retired teacher. "The cost difference alone pays for the ferry."
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 15, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Doctors said last night that President Clinton faces a recuperation period lasting at least six months after tearing a tendon above his right knee in a fall early yesterday at the Florida estate of golfing pro Greg Norman.Sounding weary but game after surgery that lasted two hours and four minutes, the president vowed he was still going to Helsinki for his long-awaited summit next week with Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin.As reporters at the Bethesda naval hospital peppered the team of doctors who repaired Clinton's knee with questions about his trip across the Atlantic, the president's voice was suddenly piped into the room.
TRAVEL
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Sun Staff | March 21, 1999
MOSCOW -- Out by train. Of all the ways to leave Russia, it may be the finest. Not giddily luxurious. Not an adventure. Certainly not fast. But a perfect blend of time and Russian-ness.The airport is a nightmare, and upon boarding a plane you're instantly in the land of Boeing. Highways are unthinkable. There's the sea, perhaps, but that's for another time.No. Let us begin at Moscow's Leningradsky Station, and the 18 dull-green cars of the Lev Tolstoy train to Helsinki, Finland, stretching down the platform and into the night.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Pond | March 27, 1997
THE UNSUNG SUCCESS of the Helsinki summit was the quiet boost it gave to Ukrainian as well as Polish security. The peace of new Central European members of NATO, the summit made clear, will not be bought at the price of greater insecurity for neighboring non-members farther east.This is the not-so-hidden message of the peaceboat diplomacy that followed the summit this week as ships from the U.S. and six other NATO countries visited the Ukrainian Black Sea port of Odessa.Joint NATO-Ukrainian naval maneuvers next August not far from Sevastopol, the Ukrainian city and naval base that the Russian parliament claims belongs to Russia, will repeat the message.
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