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NEWS
January 5, 1997
PRESIDENT CLINTON did the right thing in postponing for another six months the clause in the Helms-Burton Act boycott of Cuba that allows naturalized American citizens to sue foreign companies in U.S. courts for using property in Cuba that was owned by them as Cuban citizens four decades ago. It is also the politic thing, which probably explains why he did it.The Helms-Burton Act infuriates foreign governments and businesses, especially in Western Europe,...
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NEWS
November 3, 1998
An excerpt of a Friday Los Angeles Times editorial: FOR nearly 40 years, U.S. policy toward Cuba has failed to achieve its stated goal of overthrowing Fidel Castro through an embargo on trade and tourism.Relations between Washington and Havana have been iced since Fidel Castro's revolution broke the powerful U.S. influence on the island nation. President John F. Kennedy imposed a total embargo on Cuba in 1962. Once uncomfortable neighbors, the two countries became implacable enemies.More recently, in 1992, Congress passed the Cuban Democracy Act, which prohibited U.S.-owned or -controlled subsidiaries located abroad from doing business with Cuba.
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NEWS
July 13, 1996
PRESIDENT CLINTON should waive Title III of the FTC Helms-Burton Act for six months because it is an affront to friendly nations by purporting to legislate their citizens' behavior outside America's borders, and because the reprisals it triggers will harm U.S. interests more than the law can possibly advance them.Title III allows U.S. companies to sue in U.S. courts for damages from foreign companies that may be using property confiscated from Americans by the Cuban government in 1959. A wrinkle that defies all ex post facto restraints would allow Cubans who later become U.S. citizens to sue, extending their U.S. citizenship as well as the law backward in time.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1998
MIAMI -- It takes an insider to fully appreciate what will occur tonight in the Miami Beach Convention Center.Three bands from Cuba, including internationally acclaimed pianist Chucho Valdes and his group Irakere, are scheduled to perform on the opening night of the world's largest Latin music trade show."
NEWS
March 29, 1996
THE DRACONIAN Helms-Burton Act, which President Clinton signed into law, attempts to isolate Cuba by penalizing third parties. That's "the stick." But it left intact the people-to-people exchanges, "the carrot," of an earlier law.Now the Cuban government has warned its businessmen, think-tankers and academics against "falling into the spider web woven by foreign Cubanologists, really serving the United States in its policy of fomenting fifth columnism."...
NEWS
November 13, 1996
WHEN 19 Latin American countries plus Spain and Portugal held their sixth annual summit in Chile, Sunday and Monday, just two of the heads of government and state present were not elected. One was King Juan Carlos of Spain. The other was Fidel Castro of Cuba.The king's elected prime minister, Jose Maria Aznar, met privately with Mr. Castro, promising to influence the European Union to subsidize Cuba's transition to democracy if Mr. Castro would undertake to make it. Nothing doing, the Cuban dictator replied.
NEWS
November 3, 1998
An excerpt of a Friday Los Angeles Times editorial: FOR nearly 40 years, U.S. policy toward Cuba has failed to achieve its stated goal of overthrowing Fidel Castro through an embargo on trade and tourism.Relations between Washington and Havana have been iced since Fidel Castro's revolution broke the powerful U.S. influence on the island nation. President John F. Kennedy imposed a total embargo on Cuba in 1962. Once uncomfortable neighbors, the two countries became implacable enemies.More recently, in 1992, Congress passed the Cuban Democracy Act, which prohibited U.S.-owned or -controlled subsidiaries located abroad from doing business with Cuba.
NEWS
January 24, 1997
WHILE POST-INAUGURAL Washington was looking inward, Canada's prime minister was in Paris Wednesday and his foreign minister was in Havana. The United States' closest neighbor and NAFTA partner, sharing the largest bilateral trade in the world, has policies of its own based on interests of its own.Prime Minister Jean Chretien visited Paris to bind France to Canada as an important French-speaking country. He is boosting La Francophonie, the organization of French-speaking nations, and promoting trade.
NEWS
April 15, 1997
ARDUOUS NEGOTIATING by Under Secretary of Commerce Stuart E. Eizenstat induced the European Union to delay, from yesterday to Oct. 15, its protest of U.S. laws purporting to govern the behavior of foreigners outside the U.S.This does not end the dispute over the Helms-Burton Act, which sanctions firms anywhere that operate on property that Cuba's Communist government expropriated. It delays the crisis for six months, allowing time for resolution, but no assurance of it.The European Union was on the verge of protesting the U.S. law as a restraint on trade to the World Trade Organization.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 31, 1996
HAVANA, Cuba -- Warning of what it described as a campaign by the United States to "deceive, confuse and dismantle" the Cuban revolution, the Cuban Communist Party has called for greater ideological and economic orthodoxy, threatening "severe punishment" for those who fail to comply.Party leaders also sharply criticized features of the limited opening of the economy in the last three years that has rescued the Cuban economy from the brink of collapse, demanding increased self-reliance and discipline instead.
NEWS
April 15, 1997
ARDUOUS NEGOTIATING by Under Secretary of Commerce Stuart E. Eizenstat induced the European Union to delay, from yesterday to Oct. 15, its protest of U.S. laws purporting to govern the behavior of foreigners outside the U.S.This does not end the dispute over the Helms-Burton Act, which sanctions firms anywhere that operate on property that Cuba's Communist government expropriated. It delays the crisis for six months, allowing time for resolution, but no assurance of it.The European Union was on the verge of protesting the U.S. law as a restraint on trade to the World Trade Organization.
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | April 12, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Stepping back from a pitched battle that threatened the global trading system, the White House agreed yesterday to put tough new anti-Cuba sanctions on ice and negotiate with Europe over how best to promote democracy and human rights in Havana.In exchange, the 15-nation European Union promised to suspend its suit before the World Trade Organization. The EU, which claimed the United States overstepped its bounds last year when it imposed anti-Cuba sanctions affecting non-U.S.
NEWS
January 24, 1997
WHILE POST-INAUGURAL Washington was looking inward, Canada's prime minister was in Paris Wednesday and his foreign minister was in Havana. The United States' closest neighbor and NAFTA partner, sharing the largest bilateral trade in the world, has policies of its own based on interests of its own.Prime Minister Jean Chretien visited Paris to bind France to Canada as an important French-speaking country. He is boosting La Francophonie, the organization of French-speaking nations, and promoting trade.
NEWS
By SUSAN RIGGS | January 5, 1997
TORONTO -- Canada may be on the verge of bringing the United States, that balky bull moose loose in the china shop of the New World Order, to heel. It could do so through the North American Free Trade Agreement, possibly the World Trade Organization, or through a little-known Canadian law that has powerful implications for the United States.The issue is U.S. refusal to bow to world opinion over trade with Cuba. Specifically, Canada objects to passage of the Helms-Burton Act, that bugbear threatening its flourishing $575 million (Canadian)
NEWS
January 5, 1997
PRESIDENT CLINTON did the right thing in postponing for another six months the clause in the Helms-Burton Act boycott of Cuba that allows naturalized American citizens to sue foreign companies in U.S. courts for using property in Cuba that was owned by them as Cuban citizens four decades ago. It is also the politic thing, which probably explains why he did it.The Helms-Burton Act infuriates foreign governments and businesses, especially in Western Europe,...
NEWS
November 13, 1996
WHEN 19 Latin American countries plus Spain and Portugal held their sixth annual summit in Chile, Sunday and Monday, just two of the heads of government and state present were not elected. One was King Juan Carlos of Spain. The other was Fidel Castro of Cuba.The king's elected prime minister, Jose Maria Aznar, met privately with Mr. Castro, promising to influence the European Union to subsidize Cuba's transition to democracy if Mr. Castro would undertake to make it. Nothing doing, the Cuban dictator replied.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 23, 1996
FLORENCE, Italy -- Leaders of the 15 European Union countries, four of whom will meet this week with President Clinton in France, expressed strong criticism yesterday of U.S. legislation that would impose economic penalties on foreign companies that invest in Cuba, Iran or Libya.The European leaders registered "deep concern" about the Helms-Burton Act, which would restrict non-U.S. foreign investment in Cuba, and similar legislation being sponsored by Sen. Alfonse M. D'Amato, a New York Republican, that would penalize foreign companies that made large investments in Libya or Iran.
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | April 12, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Stepping back from a pitched battle that threatened the global trading system, the White House agreed yesterday to put tough new anti-Cuba sanctions on ice and negotiate with Europe over how best to promote democracy and human rights in Havana.In exchange, the 15-nation European Union promised to suspend its suit before the World Trade Organization. The EU, which claimed the United States overstepped its bounds last year when it imposed anti-Cuba sanctions affecting non-U.S.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | July 15, 1996
MEXICO CITY -- For foreign investors doing business with Cuba, this is judgment day: the deadline for President Clinton to make a decision on the thorny issue of tightening the economic noose around Fidel Castro, and in doing so alienating some of the United States' closest allies.Clinton has until midnight to decide whether to waive enforcement of the most controversial provision of a new law aimed at the hemisphere's last Communist regime.The law allows Clinton to waive, in six-month periods, sanctions that could cost foreign companies hundreds of millions of dollars.
NEWS
July 13, 1996
PRESIDENT CLINTON should waive Title III of the FTC Helms-Burton Act for six months because it is an affront to friendly nations by purporting to legislate their citizens' behavior outside America's borders, and because the reprisals it triggers will harm U.S. interests more than the law can possibly advance them.Title III allows U.S. companies to sue in U.S. courts for damages from foreign companies that may be using property confiscated from Americans by the Cuban government in 1959. A wrinkle that defies all ex post facto restraints would allow Cubans who later become U.S. citizens to sue, extending their U.S. citizenship as well as the law backward in time.
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