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NEWS
July 31, 2003
Two leaders of a Hells Angels motorcycle club in Southern Maryland were indicted yesterday on federal drug and gun charges stemming from a multistate, undercover investigation by the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. John A. Beal, 38, of Dunkirk and Lewis J. Hall, 34, of Owings were president and vice president of the North Beach chapter of the biker club. Hall's wife, Tracey E. Hall, 42, and club member Cornelius W. Alexander, 32, of Waldorf were charged with possessing firearms as convicted felons in yesterday's indictment in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
A federal judge in Manhattan denied bail Thursday to Ross Ulbricht after federal prosecutors alleged that he plotted six killings earlier this year to protect his position as the operator of the sprawling online drug market Silk Road. Assistant U.S. Attorney Serrin Turner said it's not clear whether five of the intended victims actually exist. But Turner argued that Ulbricht could not be released without endangering the public or running the risk that he would flee. He said the 29-year-old had explored obtaining citizenship in another country and ordered fake identity documents.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 24, 2002
NEW YORK - At least one man was killed and 10 others wounded by gunfire or knives yesterday when a motorcycle and tattoo exposition on Long Island erupted into what police described as a vicious battle between rival bike gangs. Havoc broke loose at the event, sponsored by a Long Island chapter of the Hells Angels, shortly after 4 p.m. when members of the other gang, the Pagans, entered a Plainview concert and catering hall, authorities said. Although details remained unclear last night, police and witnesses who were among about 1,000 people attending the event said gunfire erupted soon after the Pagans entered.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2013
Baltimore County police officers from several precincts were called to the Maryland State Fairgrounds in Timonium on Saturday after the promoter of a weekend motorcycle show said he asked a gang to leave. The Pagans, a rival of the Hells Angels, were asked to leave by the organizers of the Timonium Motorcycle Show about 1 p.m., police spokeswoman Elise Armacost said in an email. She said additional police support was requested because the department was concerned about a possible confrontation after the Hells Angels were displaying their colors, which motorcycle clubs were told not to do during the event.
FEATURES
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2004
The Hells Angels didn't exactly get a warm welcome to Maryland. Last May in Calvert County, members of the state's inaugural chapter celebrated their first year of membership by attending the "Blessing of the Bikes" in North Beach. A few thousand other motorcyclists also went, for reasons of their own. But so did nearly a hundred policemen, who shadowed the Angels with sniper rifles and surveillance cameras. Two months later, federal agents raided the chapter's clubhouse, arresting president John Beal and another member on gun and drug charges.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2003
A two-year undercover investigation of the Warlocks Outlaw motorcycle gang closed yesterday with authorities announcing the arrests of 34 people in six states, including six individuals in Maryland. Agents with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, who launched the probe by infiltrating a Warlocks group in western Virginia, executed nearly 50 search warrants over the past two days. One was at the North Beach Clubhouse of the Hells Angels in Calvert County. The investigation, which also reached West Virginia, Florida, New York and South Carolina, found more than 120 firearms, including sawed-off shotguns and machine guns.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 4, 1993
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- For 47 years, the Hells Angels have roared down the road as the biggest, baddest outlaw motorcycle gang.But the Oakland, Calif.-based club has a quieter, law-abiding alter ego: The Hell's Angels Motorcycle Corporation, an "organization of motorcycle enthusiasts" and the protective owner of U.S. registered trademarks for the name "Hells Angels" and its signature "death-head" logo.Legendary for brutally punishing impostors who dare don Hells Angels "colors" -- black leather jackets emblazoned with the club's name and logo -- the outlaw club is now defending its honor with an unlikely weapon: the law.The Hells Angels recently sued Marvel Comics, accusing it of "getting a free ride" on the bikers' "powerfully evocative" image with a comic book titled "Hell's Angel" about a bionic super-heroine.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2004
A prospective member of Hells Angels has been charged in the shooting last month of two rival motorcycle gang members at an Edgemere nightclub, Baltimore County police said yesterday. Wallace Schnople, 45, of the 2800 block of Pulaski Highway was being held without bail at the county detention center last night, charged with two counts of attempted murder, two counts of first-degree assault and weapons violations in the shooting, police said. The victims - Charles Zepp, 23, of Eldersburg, and Timothy McDowell, 38, of Frederick - were identified as members of the Pagans gang, according to police.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2013
Baltimore County police officers from several precincts were called to the Maryland State Fairgrounds in Timonium on Saturday after the promoter of a weekend motorcycle show said he asked a gang to leave. The Pagans, a rival of the Hells Angels, were asked to leave by the organizers of the Timonium Motorcycle Show about 1 p.m., police spokeswoman Elise Armacost said in an email. She said additional police support was requested because the department was concerned about a possible confrontation after the Hells Angels were displaying their colors, which motorcycle clubs were told not to do during the event.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
A federal judge in Manhattan denied bail Thursday to Ross Ulbricht after federal prosecutors alleged that he plotted six killings earlier this year to protect his position as the operator of the sprawling online drug market Silk Road. Assistant U.S. Attorney Serrin Turner said it's not clear whether five of the intended victims actually exist. But Turner argued that Ulbricht could not be released without endangering the public or running the risk that he would flee. He said the 29-year-old had explored obtaining citizenship in another country and ordered fake identity documents.
FEATURES
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2004
The Hells Angels didn't exactly get a warm welcome to Maryland. Last May in Calvert County, members of the state's inaugural chapter celebrated their first year of membership by attending the "Blessing of the Bikes" in North Beach. A few thousand other motorcyclists also went, for reasons of their own. But so did nearly a hundred policemen, who shadowed the Angels with sniper rifles and surveillance cameras. Two months later, federal agents raided the chapter's clubhouse, arresting president John Beal and another member on gun and drug charges.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2004
A prospective member of Hells Angels has been charged in the shooting last month of two rival motorcycle gang members at an Edgemere nightclub, Baltimore County police said yesterday. Wallace Schnople, 45, of the 2800 block of Pulaski Highway was being held without bail at the county detention center last night, charged with two counts of attempted murder, two counts of first-degree assault and weapons violations in the shooting, police said. The victims - Charles Zepp, 23, of Eldersburg, and Timothy McDowell, 38, of Frederick - were identified as members of the Pagans gang, according to police.
NEWS
July 31, 2003
Two leaders of a Hells Angels motorcycle club in Southern Maryland were indicted yesterday on federal drug and gun charges stemming from a multistate, undercover investigation by the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. John A. Beal, 38, of Dunkirk and Lewis J. Hall, 34, of Owings were president and vice president of the North Beach chapter of the biker club. Hall's wife, Tracey E. Hall, 42, and club member Cornelius W. Alexander, 32, of Waldorf were charged with possessing firearms as convicted felons in yesterday's indictment in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2003
A two-year undercover investigation of the Warlocks Outlaw motorcycle gang closed yesterday with authorities announcing the arrests of 34 people in six states, including six individuals in Maryland. Agents with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, who launched the probe by infiltrating a Warlocks group in western Virginia, executed nearly 50 search warrants over the past two days. One was at the North Beach Clubhouse of the Hells Angels in Calvert County. The investigation, which also reached West Virginia, Florida, New York and South Carolina, found more than 120 firearms, including sawed-off shotguns and machine guns.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 24, 2002
NEW YORK - At least one man was killed and 10 others wounded by gunfire or knives yesterday when a motorcycle and tattoo exposition on Long Island erupted into what police described as a vicious battle between rival bike gangs. Havoc broke loose at the event, sponsored by a Long Island chapter of the Hells Angels, shortly after 4 p.m. when members of the other gang, the Pagans, entered a Plainview concert and catering hall, authorities said. Although details remained unclear last night, police and witnesses who were among about 1,000 people attending the event said gunfire erupted soon after the Pagans entered.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Story by Kevin Cowherd and Story by Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2000
I am standing in front of John King's tidy brick rancher in Parkville when he rolls up on his 2000 Harley-Davidson twin-cam Classic, and the sight just about takes my breath away. It is a muggy, late summer evening and the last golden rays of the sun dance off the flawless black paint job and light up the polished chrome as King revs the engine lightly, then lets it idle with that distinctive, throbbing blob-blob-blob sound. I have never been on a hog in my life, but at this moment, I want one. Bad. I want an endless stretch of open road and blue skies.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 3, 1994
NEW YORK -- Seventy-seven E. Third Street is, according to the police, a place to be avoided. But to the Hell's Angels, it is home.Since 1969, America's best-known and most-feared bunch of Harley-riding, tattooed nonconformists have called the East Village apartment house both headquarters and home in New York City.Today, jury selection was to begin in U.S. District Court in Manhattan in a trial to decide whether the government can take away the Hell's Angels Motorcycle Club's East Coast Valhalla.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Story by Kevin Cowherd and Story by Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2000
I am standing in front of John King's tidy brick rancher in Parkville when he rolls up on his 2000 Harley-Davidson twin-cam Classic, and the sight just about takes my breath away. It is a muggy, late summer evening and the last golden rays of the sun dance off the flawless black paint job and light up the polished chrome as King revs the engine lightly, then lets it idle with that distinctive, throbbing blob-blob-blob sound. I have never been on a hog in my life, but at this moment, I want one. Bad. I want an endless stretch of open road and blue skies.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | May 17, 1997
SAINT-NICOLAS, Quebec -- The bomb was simplicity itself. Fifty pounds of dynamite affixed to the gasoline tank of a Jeep. Insert detonator. Set timing device. Leave vehicle on the quiet street where Hell's Angels live.On March 8, the blast, attributed to a rival gang, shattered the stillness of this community, but hardly scratched the intended target -- the steel-shuttered, concrete-reinforced headquarters of the local chapter of "Les Hells," as riders of the world's most infamous motorcycle gang are called in Quebec.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 3, 1994
NEW YORK -- Seventy-seven E. Third Street is, according to the police, a place to be avoided. But to the Hell's Angels, it is home.Since 1969, America's best-known and most-feared bunch of Harley-riding, tattooed nonconformists have called the East Village apartment house both headquarters and home in New York City.Today, jury selection was to begin in U.S. District Court in Manhattan in a trial to decide whether the government can take away the Hell's Angels Motorcycle Club's East Coast Valhalla.
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