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By Kevin Cowherd | October 28, 1999
IN THE NEWSPAPER the other day, there appeared an alarming story about veteran rockers Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young releasing a reunion album. I say "alarming" because there was also a photo of the group accompanying the story. And the photo was not, um, flattering. It looked like it was taken at a reunion of old buffalo hunters. Boy, do these guys look bad! Long, gray hair, unruly mustaches and sideburns, big guts, clothes that look like they were fished out of a Goodwill bin -- if this is what happens to rock stars in their golden years, a fatal drug overdose doesn't sound so bad. Anyway, looking at that picture, you were left with one overriding thought: I sure hope they sound better than they look.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 31, 2003
Bristling biker movies from the Brando vehicle The Wild One in 1954 to Richard Rush's Hell's Angels on Wheels in 1967 drew on published studies of rebel subcultures and torn-from-the headline incidents - and brought new breeds of cyclists to the screen with cutting-edge attitudes. The Wild One, based on Frank Rooney's The Cyclists' Raid, fictionalized the incident of 4,000 bikers taking over the small town of Hollister, Calif. Rush patterned Hell's Angels on Wheels on Hunter S. Thompson's nonfiction book Hell's Angels and even used Sonny Barger as a technical adviser.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 3, 1994
NEW YORK -- Seventy-seven E. Third Street is, according to the police, a place to be avoided. But to the Hell's Angels, it is home.Since 1969, America's best-known and most-feared bunch of Harley-riding, tattooed nonconformists have called the East Village apartment house both headquarters and home in New York City.Today, jury selection was to begin in U.S. District Court in Manhattan in a trial to decide whether the government can take away the Hell's Angels Motorcycle Club's East Coast Valhalla.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | October 28, 1999
IN THE NEWSPAPER the other day, there appeared an alarming story about veteran rockers Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young releasing a reunion album. I say "alarming" because there was also a photo of the group accompanying the story. And the photo was not, um, flattering. It looked like it was taken at a reunion of old buffalo hunters. Boy, do these guys look bad! Long, gray hair, unruly mustaches and sideburns, big guts, clothes that look like they were fished out of a Goodwill bin -- if this is what happens to rock stars in their golden years, a fatal drug overdose doesn't sound so bad. Anyway, looking at that picture, you were left with one overriding thought: I sure hope they sound better than they look.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 31, 2003
Bristling biker movies from the Brando vehicle The Wild One in 1954 to Richard Rush's Hell's Angels on Wheels in 1967 drew on published studies of rebel subcultures and torn-from-the headline incidents - and brought new breeds of cyclists to the screen with cutting-edge attitudes. The Wild One, based on Frank Rooney's The Cyclists' Raid, fictionalized the incident of 4,000 bikers taking over the small town of Hollister, Calif. Rush patterned Hell's Angels on Wheels on Hunter S. Thompson's nonfiction book Hell's Angels and even used Sonny Barger as a technical adviser.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 28, 1996
COPENHAGEN, Denmark -- Until the Scandinavian biker war started, Jorn "Jonke" Nielsen, a Hell's Angel doing time for murder, was becoming quite a popular and respected guy in Denmark.Politicians sought his opinions on law enforcement. Schools invited him to chat about the free-wheeling lifestyle of the biker. He wrote books. He got haircuts. He had a photo spread in the Hell's Angels calendar. And he was pretty much free to come and go from prison.It was so open-minded, so progressive, so Scandinavian.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 28, 1996
COPENHAGEN, Denmark -- Until the Scandinavian biker war started, Jorn "Jonke" Nielsen, a Hell's Angel doing time for murder, was becoming quite a popular and respected guy in Denmark.Politicians sought his opinions on law enforcement. Schools invited him to chat about the free-wheeling lifestyle of the biker. He wrote books. He got haircuts. He had a photo spread in the Hell's Angels calendar. And he was pretty much free to come and go from prison.It was so open-minded, so progressive, so Scandinavian.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 3, 1994
NEW YORK -- Seventy-seven E. Third Street is, according to the police, a place to be avoided. But to the Hell's Angels, it is home.Since 1969, America's best-known and most-feared bunch of Harley-riding, tattooed nonconformists have called the East Village apartment house both headquarters and home in New York City.Today, jury selection was to begin in U.S. District Court in Manhattan in a trial to decide whether the government can take away the Hell's Angels Motorcycle Club's East Coast Valhalla.
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