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By Alec Matthew Klein and Alec Matthew Klein,Sun Staff Writer | February 16, 1995
Helix Health System is forging a $30 million marriage between hospitals and doctors to boost business and improve services, company officials said yesterday.The state's second largest health care provider, admitting 52,000 patients annually, has created a network of physicians called HelixCare that will serve the nonprofit system's four hospitals -- Church Home and Hospital, Franklin Square Hospital Center, Good Samaritan Hospital of Maryland and Union Memorial Hospital."It's going to be primary-care driven," said HelixCare board Chairman William L. Thomas.
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NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 11, 2004
When I perused the offerings of the 2004-2005 concert season in advance, the Candlelight Concerts program Saturday by the Triple Helix Piano Trio went on my calendar before all others. To be honest, I'd never heard of the group, which, it turns out, is a Boston-based ensemble consisting of violinist Bayla Keyes, cellist Rhonda Rider and pianist Lois Shapiro. What did grab my attention was the pairing of Franz Schubert's celestial B-flat Piano Trio and Beethoven's "Ghost" Trio, Op. 70, No. 1. Both are among the greatest chamber works ever composed, both represent their creators at the apex of their art, and both are indispensable for the continued well-being of my soul.
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BUSINESS
November 19, 1996
HelixCare, the doctors' group affiliated with Helix Health, said yesterday that it is forming a Howard County division from four primary-care practices and one cardiology practice.Joining HelixCare are Milles, Oken & Seals, internists; Primary Care Specialists; Parnes, May and Associates, pediatrics and adolescent medicine; Robert Goodwin & Associates, family practitioners; and Hantman, Parnes & Valenti, cardiologists.With the 24 physicians in Howard County, HelixCare will have 131 doctors with equity interests, accounting for about 450,000 patient visits a year.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2003
Six hundred fifty light-years from Earth, a star exploded. Its dusty shrapnel, racing outward at 18 miles per second, formed the Helix Nebula, a shimmering smoke ring in the constellation Aquarius. When Helix turned up in the sights of the Hubble Space Telescope 32,000 years later, scientists snapped what proved to be an exquisite turquoise-and-amber portrait. But one snapshot, however detailed, can't tell the complex scientific tale of the stellar blast. So the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore called on video artist Greg Bacon.
BUSINESS
February 21, 1998
Helix Health has signed a 10-year contract with Computer Sciences Corp. of El Segundo, Calif., to develop an automated purchasing, warehousing and distribution system to manage supplies for Helix's five hospitals, CSC announced yesterday.As part of the deal, about 20 Helix employees have gone to work for CSC.The arrangement came out of a Helix "re-engineering" effort called "Building Helix Health." It is expected to save Helix $42 million over 10 years and be worth some $70 million to CSC over that period.
BUSINESS
October 16, 1998
Helix/Medlantic, the seven-hospital health system created by the merger in May of Baltimore and Washington systems, will open headquarters early next year in Columbia.John P. McDaniel, chief executive of the merged system, said about 80 employees will work at the corporate headquarters, which will occupy 25,000 square feet in the Clark Building, 5665 Sterrett Place.McDaniel said the system would keep as much decision-making as possible at each facility "and keep it very thin at the corporate level."
BUSINESS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Sun Staff Writer | June 4, 1995
Think of big Baltimore hospital health systems and Johns Hopkins usually comes to mind.But Hopkins has an up-and-coming rival, Helix Health, a little-known organization that might be your future source of medical care.Helix is a striking illustration of how hospitals are changing. Traditionally as independent as cats, they're joining forces to compete for insurance contracts.These hospital alliances strive to offer a complete package of health services and make them available in all the communities where insurers' subscribers live.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff Writer | February 9, 1994
Good Samaritan Hospital yesterday agreed to join two other hospitals in the Helix Health System, creating the largest hospital network in the state after Johns Hopkins and paving the way for the group to develop a full range of medical services.In addition to Good Samaritan, Helix includes Union Memorial Hospital and Franklin Square Medical Center, and a panoply of businesses and services ranging from apartments for the elderly to rehabilitation beds.The new system, which would have estimated 1994 revenues of $420 million, serves an area covering the northern and eastern parts of Baltimore and Baltimore County, Harford County and the southern portion of Cecil County.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | November 16, 1995
The merger of Harbor Health System into Helix Health was approved yesterday by the boards of both companies.Helix will emerge as the largest health-care provider in Maryland.The merger gives Helix a strong foothold in Anne Arundel County, one of the areas it had targeted. Harbor operates the 376-bed Harbor Hospital on South Hanover Street in South Baltimore and plans to open Harbor Health Park on Ritchie Highway in Pasadena in March. Helix already includes four other hospitals in the Baltimore area, and it has a partnership with Medlantic Health Care Group, based in the Washington area.
BUSINESS
By Abbe Gluck and Abbe Gluck,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1996
A California health care executive yesterday was tapped to head a joint venture between Helix Health and Medlantic Healthcare Group.George H. Schmitt, 56, was named president and chief executive officer of BWHealth, the joint venture produced by the companies' alliance last year, and charged with developing their health care business in the lucrative Baltimore- Washington corridor.Schmitt will "work across the two systems to create a coalition of effort in cost cutting," said James A. Oakey, president and chief executive officer of Baltimore-based Helix.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2003
About noon on Feb. 28, 1953, two men burst into their favorite pub, a scruffy spot called The Eagle near their Cambridge University laboratory. As people sipped their beers and forked down shepherd's pie, one of the men gleefully announced: "We have discovered the secret of life." The scene - which played out 50 years ago this week - is one of the most famous of 20th- century science. It marked the conclusion to an intellectual footrace to find the structure of deoxyribonucleic acid, better known as DNA. Playing with a crude cardboard model of the DNA molecule, Francis Crick, a 36-year- old Englishman, and his 24- year-old American partner, James Watson, had puzzled out DNA's now-familiar double helix early that day. Their discovery solved the fundamental mystery of heredity, how everything from eye color to crippling disease can be passed through generations.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2002
HMOs are expanding their participation in the state's Medicaid program, Debbie I. Chang, deputy health secretary, said yesterday. This month, Chang said, Americaid expanded to cover most of the state, and Priority Partners, which had frozen enrollments in four counties, reopened enrollment throughout the stat e. Two other health maintenance organizations with enrollment limits, Helix Family Care and United Healthcare, lifted their restrictions a...
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2000
FreeState Health Plan is cutting back its participation in the state's Medicaid program, but other HMOs are continuing their current participation. The HMOs will be paid at rates averaging 5.7 percent higher than this year's, state health officials announced yesterday. "With these new rates, we have a viable statewide managed care program," said Debbie I. Chang, deputy health secretary for health care financing. FreeState said it will continue to participate in Baltimore, where it has 38,000 members, but end its Medicaid program in the rest of the state.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | July 10, 2000
It will take a wizard to bring down the Baltimore homicide rate. That's why everyone is reading "Martin O'Malley and the Goblet of Fire." Pat Buchanan is a hero preserving the two-party system. He will single-handedly slay the Reform Party. The Baltimore County housing boom continues. Dutch needs a thousand new jail beds. Never mind the genome. Most of us don't even know what a double helix is.
NEWS
November 19, 1999
DANIEL NATHANS represented the very best of Johns Hopkins. A brilliant scientist who won a Nobel Prize, a quiet but effective leader who for two crucial years presided over the university and medical system, Dr. Nathans inspired students, researchers, professors and administrators.This unflappable figure became a living legend on the Hopkins campus. It was richly deserved. He was, after all, the father of modern biotechnology.Dr. Nathans found ways to use certain enzymes to unlock the genetic secrets of the DNA double helix.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1999
MedStar Health -- already the largest health system in the region with five hospitals in the Baltimore area and two in Washington -- and Georgetown University announced yesterday that they have decided to have MedStar operate Georgetown's financially troubled hospital.MedStar and Georgetown said they signed a "letter of commitment" yesterday but that a final agreement was several months away.The deal would represent the next step in the evolution of MedStar, which was formed a little more than a year ago by the merger of Helix Health, based in the Baltimore area, and Medlantic Healthcare Group, operator of Washington Hospital Center, the largest hospital in the District of Columbia.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1998
The boards of Helix Health and Medlantic Healthcare Group yesterday approved a merger, creating the largest health system in the region, and outlined the management structure of the new organization.The merger was initially announced in February. When it becomes final -- expected to be July 1 -- the system will have seven hospitals with 2,300 acute-care beds and 100,000 inpatient admissions.It includes a wide range of other health services, including five nursing homes, physician practices, a medical equipment company, a radiation oncology company, home health care and rehabilitation centers.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1996
Helix Health System and Medlantic Healthcare Group are teaming to create one of the largest health-care systems in the country, aimed at generating business in the potentially lucrative suburbs in the Baltimore-Washington corridor.The two managed-care operations have chosen Columbia as the headquarters for their joint venture, to be called BWHealth. The name is yet another symbol of their interest in establishing a presence in the corridor, where neither has any operations now.That interest is driven largely by the demographics of Howard, Anne Arundel and Charles counties.
BUSINESS
October 16, 1998
Helix/Medlantic, the seven-hospital health system created by the merger in May of Baltimore and Washington systems, will open headquarters early next year in Columbia.John P. McDaniel, chief executive of the merged system, said about 80 employees will work at the corporate headquarters, which will occupy 25,000 square feet in the Clark Building, 5665 Sterrett Place.McDaniel said the system would keep as much decision-making as possible at each facility "and keep it very thin at the corporate level."
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | July 27, 1998
The five-hospital Helix Health system is gearing up for a major push into the highly competitive area of women's services.On Saturday, Helix said it would provide free labor "doulas" (a Greek word loosely meaning "helper") for the next year to women giving birth at the three Helix hospitals with obstetric services.The system also recently launched an "OB/TLC" phone service, providing support and referrals around the clock."We're trying to raise the bar in women's services," said Dr. Vicki Lucas, vice president of women's services for Helix.
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