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By AEGIS STAFF REPORT | August 1, 2011
A pilot was transported to Harford Memorial Hospital in Havre de Grace late Friday afternoon for observation and treatment of non-life threatening injuries after a helicopter accident in Darlington. At about 5:30 p.m., the Harford County 911 center started getting calls about a helicopter crash in the area of the 4100 block of Conowingo Road in Darlington. Police and volunteer fire and EMS personnel from the Darlington Volunteer Fire Department responded and when they arrived they found the pilot standing outside of the wreckage of a privately-owned, small helicopter.
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By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2014
It was the kind of mission that Warrant Officer George Carlton Bloodworth flew daily in Vietnam. But on Sept. 20, 1969, it went badly wrong. Bloodworth was piloting the second of two scout helicopters on a reconnaissance mission over the Mekong Delta in South Vietnam, speeding 100 feet off the ground, when the lead helicopter was shot down. As he circled back to search for its two-man crew, his own helicopter was shot down, and he was hit by ground fire. Still, he found the downed crew and helped lead the wounded pilot, the pilot's crew chief and his own crew chief through withering fire to safety.
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By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | September 11, 1995
Harold G. Sommer, a pioneering helicopter pilot and retired Baltimore City police officer, died Wednesday of a heart attack at Stoney Creek Democratic Club in Orchard Beach. He was 79.Mr. Sommer, who had lived for 32 years in Riviera Beach, was one of the first six pilots to graduate from the Army Air Force helicopter school. He flew the first Sikorsky helicopters from the company's Michigan plant during the waning months of World War II, helped test helicopter mail service in 1946, and flew for an Air Force air rescue unit in Newfoundland, Canada.
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April 15, 2013
Gov. Martin O' Malley has ordered the U.S. and Maryland flags at state facilities flown at half-staff on Monday to honor Army Capt. Sara M. Knutson, a helicopter pilot from Eldersburg who died last month in Afghanistan. Knutson, 27, was one of five soldiers killed March 11 in the crash of a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter during training near Kandahar, the Pentagon said. A 2003 graduate of Liberty High School and a 2007 graduate of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, Knutson is the only Marylander to die in Afghanistan this year.
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By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2014
It was the kind of mission that Warrant Officer George Carlton Bloodworth flew daily in Vietnam. But on Sept. 20, 1969, it went badly wrong. Bloodworth was piloting the second of two scout helicopters on a reconnaissance mission over the Mekong Delta in South Vietnam, speeding 100 feet off the ground, when the lead helicopter was shot down. As he circled back to search for its two-man crew, his own helicopter was shot down, and he was hit by ground fire. Still, he found the downed crew and helped lead the wounded pilot, the pilot's crew chief and his own crew chief through withering fire to safety.
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By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 7, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Nearly 30 years to the day after they risked their lives to stop the My Lai massacre in Vietnam, a helicopter pilot and his crew were honored yesterday by the U.S. Army, graying veterans and even former anti-war demonstrators on a quiet knoll above the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.Former pilot Hugh C. Thompson Jr. and his door gunner Lawrence Colburn stood under a bright blue sky while an Army band played. A general recalled their heroism on a morning of madness in a far-off, steamy jungle.
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By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1998
Jack C. Turley, a former Vietnam combat helicopter pilot who was later a Baltimore police officer in the helicopter unit and taught other officers to pilot the law enforcement aircraft from 1980 to 1985, died Tuesday of cancer at his Clinton home. He was 48."He got the biggest joy out of seeing one of his students go solo," said his wife, the former Camille Branch, whom he married in 1989. They met as she trained for her helicopter pilot's license in 1985."He enjoyed the challenge, the precision and the freedom of flying," she said.
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By New York Times | March 4, 1991
Maj. Marie T. Rossi, a helicopter pilot who was featured in national news reports last week as she ferried cargo into battle against Iraq, was killed in a non-combat helicopter crash the day after the cease-fire, military officials say.Rossi, one of the first American officers to cross into enemy territory when the ground assault began on Feb. 24, died Friday when her CH-47 Chinook helicopter went down "somewhere in the Desert Storm theater," said Capt....
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By Los Angeles Times | June 5, 1995
GRAFENWOEHR, Germany -- On mornings when he hasn't had to fly the night before and isn't exhausted, U.S. Army helicopter pilot Melvin Dixon has been getting up at 6 a.m. lately to catch the previous night's evening network news as it's broadcast here from America."
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By Boston Globe | October 7, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. mission in what troops there call "South Moag" has changed for many: Rangers, Delta force commandos and the various intelligence agencies are no longer concentrating their search on warlord Mohamed Farah Aidid.They are looking for one of their own in the streets of south Mogadishu -- Chief Warrant Officer Michael Durant. And they are trying to find out how many of the five men who disappeared with the Berlin, N.H., helicopter pilot survived a firefight Sunday.Whatever the case may be, officials say, Mr. Aidid has ceased to be the quarry.
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By AEGIS STAFF REPORT | August 1, 2011
A pilot was transported to Harford Memorial Hospital in Havre de Grace late Friday afternoon for observation and treatment of non-life threatening injuries after a helicopter accident in Darlington. At about 5:30 p.m., the Harford County 911 center started getting calls about a helicopter crash in the area of the 4100 block of Conowingo Road in Darlington. Police and volunteer fire and EMS personnel from the Darlington Volunteer Fire Department responded and when they arrived they found the pilot standing outside of the wreckage of a privately-owned, small helicopter.
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By Michael Dresser and Kelly Brewington and Michael Dresser and Kelly Brewington and,michael.dresser@baltsun.com and kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | September 30, 2008
A nearly 20-year-old Maryland State Police helicopter that crashed in darkness and fog over the weekend, killing four people, was not equipped with an advanced electronic system that helps prevent pilots from slamming into the ground in low-visibility conditions, federal transportation officials said yesterday. Investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board said they were still working to determine the cause of the crash in Prince George's County, the deadliest incident in the 38 years state police have been flying medical evacuation missions.
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By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,sun reporter | July 25, 2007
Rhonda Fish returned Monday night to the White Marsh hotel where she has been living to find that her beloved Yorkshire terrier had run away. The 44-year-old woman was devastated. The not-quite-3-year-old pooch named Reilly is like a son to her. Fish, her fiance and their friends prowled the area for hours but did not find Reilly. Their efforts transcended the realm of the typical missing-dog search yesterday when they called in private investigators. And then the helicopter pilot. And then the psychic.
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By Alia Malik and Alia Malik,Sun Reporter | July 1, 2007
James Hildebrandt Sellors, an entrepreneur who built and flew his own airplanes, died in his Woodstock home June 24 of unknown causes. He was 79. Born and raised in Baltimore, Mr. Sellors graduated from Polytechnic Institute in 1946. While there, he formed the Delta Theta Pi social club, which he remained involved in for the rest of his life. Mr. Sellors graduated from the Johns Hopkins University in 1950 with a degree in industrial engineering. He went on to become a certified public accountant and later attended the Mount Vernon School of Law, which later was absorbed into the University of Baltimore, eventually becoming a member of the Maryland Bar Association.
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By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 27, 2004
KIEV, Ukraine - Elated by the early returns but wary of last-minute subterfuge, tens of thousands of supporters of presidential candidate Viktor A. Yushchenko gathered in Independence Square last night to sing, dance and wait for word of their candidate's fate. The official results weren't expected until today. But Yushchenko declared victory early this morning, telling supporters, "Today, Ukraine is beginning a new political life." With ballots from just over 87 percent of precincts counted, Yushchenko was leading this morning with 54 percent compared with Prime Minister Viktor F. Yanukovych's 42 percent.
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By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2004
NASA's adventures have long served as a source of inspiration for Hollywood. Now Tinsletown is set to return the favor. On Wednesday, a 450-pound capsule bearing precious cosmic treasure - specimens from the sun - will parachute down to the Utah desert. Racing through air to rescue it will be a pair of Hollywood helicopter stunt pilots. Their delicate task: to snatch the falling capsule and its fragile cargo from the sky with custom-built boom and deliver it safely to anxious scientists on the ground.
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April 15, 2013
Gov. Martin O' Malley has ordered the U.S. and Maryland flags at state facilities flown at half-staff on Monday to honor Army Capt. Sara M. Knutson, a helicopter pilot from Eldersburg who died last month in Afghanistan. Knutson, 27, was one of five soldiers killed March 11 in the crash of a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter during training near Kandahar, the Pentagon said. A 2003 graduate of Liberty High School and a 2007 graduate of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, Knutson is the only Marylander to die in Afghanistan this year.
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June 13, 1992
J. Cullen Weadock, retired president of Chesapeake and Potomac Airways Inc., a Baltimore-based company that operates commercial helicopters, died May 31 of cancer at his home in Vero Beach, Fla. He was 70.Mr. Weadock retired and sold the company in 1980.He helped found it at what was then Friendship International Airport in 1957. He became president in 1964, expanding its operations to 11 states.He was elected president three times of the Helicopter Association International, an industry trade group, and was the 1974 recipient of its Lawrence D. Bell Award.
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By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2004
More than three weeks after Adam Mooney's family learned that he was missing after a helicopter crash in Iraq, they have received the news they expected and dreaded: The Eastern Shore Army first lieutenant is dead. A Tacoma, Wash., newspaper first reported that Mooney's body was found Friday by Mosul residents. Maj. David Farlow of U.S. Central Command in Tampa, Fla., confirmed yesterday that the remains have been recovered for all troops involved in a series of Jan. 25 mishaps. Mooney, 28, becomes the sixth Maryland servicemen killed since March 20, when the United States and its allies launched the war on Iraq.
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By FROM STAFF REPORTS | December 19, 2003
In Baltimore City Toll facilities police collect 6,000 items for Toys for Tots Maryland Transportation Authority police have collected 6,000 toys for distribution to underprivileged children through the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve's Toys for Tots campaign. The new, unwrapped toys were donated by motorists at Baltimore-area toll facilities Dec. 10 to 12, and delivered to a Marine Corps Reserve base in Northeast Baltimore on Monday. In announcing the toy tally, the police agency thanked those who made donations.
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