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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | October 22, 2001
When is a work of art a moral affront, and when is it simply a sign of the times? After the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, the Baltimore Museum of Art found itself asking that when visitors to the museum complained that a 1990 painting by American artist Christopher Wool, which for years had hung mostly unremarked upon in the museum's contemporary wing, suddenly seemed disturbing. Wool's painting, Terrorist, is an aggressive, in-your-face composition of three lines of letters - "TER," "ROR" and "IST" - stenciled in black against a stark white background.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | October 22, 2001
When is a work of art a moral affront, and when is it simply a sign of the times? After the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, the Baltimore Museum of Art found itself asking that when visitors to the museum complained that a 1990 painting by American artist Christopher Wool, which for years had hung mostly unremarked upon in the museum's contemporary wing, suddenly seemed disturbing. Wool's painting, Terrorist, is an aggressive, in-your-face composition of three lines of letters - "TER," "ROR" and "IST" - stenciled in black against a stark white background.
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By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1999
A director of a New York university gallery known for her ability to communicate with both artists and audiences has been hired by the Baltimore Museum of Art to curate contemporary art exhibitions and to oversee the reinstallation of the museum's contemporary art wing.Helen Molesworth, an assistant professor and the director of the Amelie A. Wallace Gallery at the State University of New York at Old Westbury, will begin her new job in January. She will step into a curatorial position unfilled since early 1998 -- when Brenda Richardson resigned after holding the job for 23 years.
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By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1999
A director of a New York university gallery known for her ability to communicate with both artists and audiences has been hired by the Baltimore Museum of Art to curate contemporary art exhibitions and to oversee the reinstallation of the museum's contemporary art wing.Helen Molesworth, an assistant professor and the director of the Amelie A. Wallace Gallery at the State University of New York at Old Westbury, will begin her new job in January. She will step into a curatorial position unfilled since early 1998 -- when Brenda Richardson resigned after holding the job for 23 years.
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By GLENN MCNATT | December 10, 2000
The critic Robert Hughes has commented that, unlike our grandparents, we live in a world that we ourselves have made. "Until about 50 years ago, images of nature were the keys to feelings in art," Hughes wrote in his 1981 book, "The Shock of the New." "If this sense has now become dimmed," Hughes observed, "it is partly because for most people nature has been replaced by the culture of congestion: of cities and mass media. ... In the last 30 years, capitalism plus electronics have given us a new habitat, our forest of media."
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By Michael Scarcella and Michael Scarcella,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2001
Christopher Wool's stark painting featuring the word terrorist has been removed from the Baltimore Museum of Art's contemporary wing because patrons complained that the piece was "disturbing," a museum security guard said yesterday. The painting - which displays in three lines "TER," "ROR," and "IST" in stenciled, black lettering - was taken down Friday morning before the museum's 11 a.m. opening. The museum made no public announcement of the work's removal and there is no printed explanation at its former location to explain why it was removed.
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By Meredith James and Meredith James,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2003
What do beer, salad and statues have in common? While seemingly unrelated, the Baltimore Museum of Art unites them in its innovative show, Work Ethic. Art is pushed to the limit as the BMA celebrates its newest exhibition, which includes work from more than 80 artists, with three hours of interactive displays. The presentation showcases the transition in creative process since the 1960s, which has revolutionized the way the public perceives art. "It's a completely different experience," Anne Mannix of the BMA says.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | July 23, 2005
The curator who helped reshape how the Baltimore Museum of Art presents contemporary art and initiated several major acquisitions for the museum is leaving to take a post at the art museum of the University of California at Berkeley. Chris Gilbert, who during his three-year tenure at the BMA created innovative, cutting-edge exhibitions that were highly popular with younger museumgoers, will leave in early September to become Phyllis Wattis MATRIX curator at Berkeley's Art Museum and Film Archive, said BMA spokeswoman Anne Mannix.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | October 12, 2003
I was fixin' to start fidgeting as I approached the entrance to Work Ethic, the long-anticipated show about the changing nature of artistic labor that opens today at the Baltimore Museum of Art . After all, this was billed as an exhibition of artists who mostly rejected the very idea of having their works presented in museums, along with the notion that artworks are beautiful, precious objects whose main reason for being is to serve as luxury items that...
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | February 1, 2000
A reminder to artists: The deadline for applications to participate in the visual arts exhibitions and artists' market of Artscape, Baltimore's summers arts festival, is this Friday. Applications are available from the Mayor's Advisory Committee on the Art and Culture at 21 S. Eutaw St., or call 410-396-4575. "We have gotten some 300 applications this year, which is more than in any previous year," said Denise Tassin, arts planner for the committee. "Every year we try to reach a broader audience, and it seems our efforts are paying off."
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | March 11, 2003
Baltimore's contemporary art scene seems in a bit of a doldrums right now, with the departure last fall of the Baltimore Museum of Art's contemporary curator, Helen Molesworth, and the failure of the Contemporary Museum to name a successor after last summer's abrupt exit of director Gary Sangster. But things appear to be looking up. BMA director Doreen Bolger and her search committee could select a candidate to replace Molesworth as early as May, museum administrators say. They're looking for someone who is engaged with contemporary art and who has a rapport with the artists.
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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2000
At Freestyle, the Baltimore Museum of Art's monthly First Thursday celebration, JoAnn Partee and son Travis Harper don't just meander among the masterpieces; they make their own. At a recent Freestyle, Travis, a 9-year-old fourth-grader at Pimlico Elementary School, made sketches of live models dressed as subjects worthy of Renoir and contemporaries. Later, at a lively poetry jam, his mother, a U.S. District Court deputy clerk, read her work "Tranquility," inspired by the painting "Evening Glow," by Alma Thomas.
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