Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHelen Mirren
IN THE NEWS

Helen Mirren

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2013
Executive producer Barry Levinson urges viewers to think of his HBO film "Phil Spector" as a two-person play - not a docudrama about the first murder trial of the rock producer. "It really is a two-person piece," Levinson said in a telephone interview last week. "And if you're looking for some kind of docudrama, which we are more familiar with on television, this isn't it. " The two persons, Academy Award-winners Al Pacino as Spector and Helen Mirren as his defense attorney, Linda Kenney Baden, can fill a screen like few others.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2013
Executive producer Barry Levinson urges viewers to think of his HBO film "Phil Spector" as a two-person play - not a docudrama about the first murder trial of the rock producer. "It really is a two-person piece," Levinson said in a telephone interview last week. "And if you're looking for some kind of docudrama, which we are more familiar with on television, this isn't it. " The two persons, Academy Award-winners Al Pacino as Spector and Helen Mirren as his defense attorney, Linda Kenney Baden, can fill a screen like few others.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By DAVID ZURAWIK | April 26, 1998
Helen Mirren's got the blues in "Painted Lady" tonight at 9 on "Masterpiece Theatre."The Emmy Award-winning actress plays Maggie Sheridan, a burned-out, debauched blues singer living off the kindness of a wealthy Englishman who remembers her glory days. But when the Englishman is murdered, Maggie gets her act together and goes a' sleuthing.Don't come looking for Jane Tennison, and you won't be disappointed. The role of Maggie was written for Mirren, and she has a romp with it. Not as intense or deep as "Prime Suspect," but far more fun."
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
What a great weekend: HBO sent a screener for "Phil Spector," a made-for-TV movie about the legendary music producer, starring Al Pacino and Helen Mirren. Barry Levinson is the executive producer, with David Mamet as writer and director. That enough talent for you? David Mamet, whose "Glengarry Glen Ross" is made of the same fine angry American genius as Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman," and he's writing and directing a Sunday-night made-for-television movie on HBO. Talk to me some more about how TV dumbs down the culture.
NEWS
August 20, 2006
ELIZABETH I -- HBO / $29.98 This dazzling four-hour film starring Helen Mirren as the 16th-century ruler who reunited England and became one of the nation's most beloved leaders earned 13 Emmy nominations -- more than either Fox's 24 or ABC's Grey's Anatomy. And they were richly deserved, particularly the one for Mirren as best actress in a miniseries. Her range is astounding. At one end of the tour de force performance, she's playfully rolling her eyes as ancient, grim-faced, male advisers urge her to heed the ticking of her biological clock and get about the business of producing an heir.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
What a great weekend: HBO sent a screener for "Phil Spector," a made-for-TV movie about the legendary music producer, starring Al Pacino and Helen Mirren. Barry Levinson is the executive producer, with David Mamet as writer and director. That enough talent for you? David Mamet, whose "Glengarry Glen Ross" is made of the same fine angry American genius as Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman," and he's writing and directing a Sunday-night made-for-television movie on HBO. Talk to me some more about how TV dumbs down the culture.
NEWS
By LYNN SMITH | April 23, 2006
Hollywood -- Cleopatra was the first. Then Titania, the fairy queen; Geruth, a Danish queen; Queen Charlotte in The Madness of King George; and the voice of the queen in the animated Prince of Egypt - oh, yes, and two reprisals of Cleopatra along the way. This year, actress Helen Mirren is about to extend a 42-year career sparkling with queenly parts with back-to-back roles as English queens - Elizabeth I and Elizabeth II. "It was an amazing experience to...
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | October 19, 2006
Helen Mirren has such a strong physical presence that it's hard to isolate her voice from the rest of her acting. The unconventionality of her jutting nose makes her gorgeously proud, and her alert face even more beautiful; her body is all business, whatever the business at hand. Yet when you hear her voice on the phone from Los Angeles, her personality comes across in every sound she makes, from the zesty, womanly curiosity of her "Oh, really?" or "That's very interesting" to the declarative romance of "I love that."
FEATURES
November 17, 2006
THE QUESTION The award season is just around the corner. What movies and/or actors do you consider to be Oscar contenders? you're such a critic WHAT YOU SAY For my money, the Best Picture, so far, has been either L'Enfant or Lady Vengeance (best American movie has been Little Miss Sunshine), while the best acting awards, again so far, belong to Forest Whitaker (The Last King of Scotland) and Helen Mirren (The Queen). PETER MUNCIE, COLUMBIA In the acting realm, the compelling, carefully nuanced performance of Forest Whitaker, as a deranged dictator in The Last King of Scotland, gets my nod. In the film category, I'm going with Martin Scorsese's The Departed.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | October 20, 2006
In The Queen, Helen Mirren, as Queen Elizabeth II, does an exhilarating, death-defying tightrope walk in sensible shoes, and Michael Sheen, as her new Labor prime minister, Tony Blair, spots her brilliantly. It would be amazing enough simply for Mirren to adopt a stance, a mind-set, an eye-set of redoubtable discernment and rectitude when she first meets with Blair. But when the queen is with her family, Mirren adopts a brusqueness, vigor and dry humor that match the public figure in weight and plausibility.
ENTERTAINMENT
By L'Oreal Thompson | January 17, 2012
Valentine's Day comes early to William McKinley High School. After a brief holiday hiatus, our favorite glee kids are back and sappier...I mean, more romantic...than ever. Case in point? The show opener with the Grease classic "Summer Nights" starring pseudo star-crossed lovers Mercedes and Sam. Sweet. And finally, after weeks of guessing, it's revealed that Helen Mirren (yes, the Helen Mirren) is the celebrity voice-over for Becky, the cheerleader. If I had to choose a celeb to voice my inner monologues, it would be Beyonce, obvi.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2010
If Baltimore had a pop-culture Mount Rushmore, Barry Levinson, John Waters and David Simon would be on it. In a few months, it might be time to start clearing room for one more filmmaker. On April 8, Pikesville-bred TV comedy whiz Jason Winer makes his big-screen debut with a star-studded production of a beloved old movie: "Arthur. " The trade journal Variety has already called him "One of the top ten directors to watch. " 2010 was a powerhouse year for Winer. He executive-produced the Emmy-winning ABC comedy "Modern Family" and directed every other episode in the first season.
FEATURES
June 14, 2009
Kyra Sedgwick, Holly Hunter, Angela Lansbury - Baltimore native Jada Pinkett Smith is about to join some pretty exclusive company when her new weekly TV series, HawthoRNe, debuts Tuesday on TNT. Like those other actresses who made their reputations in feature films, she is coming to TV as both star and executive producer of a series designed to showcase her talents. The trade-off is a simple one: The TV network or cable channel gets a film-caliber star who will attract new viewers, and the star gets a steady paycheck and control of the material in which she appears.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | January 6, 2009
[Sony Pictures] Starring David Niven, Kim Hunter; James Mason, Helen Mirren. Both directed by Michael Powell. $24.96. *** 1/2 dvds Best known for directing one of the most beautiful (1948's The Red Shoes) and one of the most controversially voyeuristic (1960's Peeping Tom) films ever released, British director Michael Powell packed a lot more than those two milestones into his four-decade career. This two-disc set, with movies made available for the first time on DVD, offers evidence of both his talent and his singular vision.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow | April 22, 2007
THE QUEEN -- Miramax / $29.99 Stephen Frears' scintillating The Queen imbues the negotiations between new Labor Prime Minister Tony Blair (Michael Sheen) and Queen Elizabeth II (Helen Mirren) over Princess Diana's funeral with the tension and humor Hollywood reserves for films about the Mafia. The queen puts off any show of mourning for Diana. When Blair dubs Diana "The People's Princess," he unifies the country and shows up her antique reflexes. But what starts out as a deliciously polite black comedy about royal inertia and modernity turns into a political mating dance with unexpected feints and turns.
FEATURES
February 23, 2007
WHAT YOU SAY Even if my family and I hadn't seen the real Queen Elizabeth II last summer coming down the mall from the palace in an open carriage for a palace guard ceremony, I will see Helen Mirren in The Queen again and again. This movie features spectacular acting, real life drama, and beautiful on-site scenes. The DVD will be a shoo-in. David Boyd, White Hall In the last year, I have seen the movie The Queen two times and I could see it again. Helen Mirren simply mesmerizes me with her performance and I plan to buy it on DVD so that I can invite friends over (who have not seen it)
ENTERTAINMENT
By L'Oreal Thompson | January 17, 2012
Valentine's Day comes early to William McKinley High School. After a brief holiday hiatus, our favorite glee kids are back and sappier...I mean, more romantic...than ever. Case in point? The show opener with the Grease classic "Summer Nights" starring pseudo star-crossed lovers Mercedes and Sam. Sweet. And finally, after weeks of guessing, it's revealed that Helen Mirren (yes, the Helen Mirren) is the celebrity voice-over for Becky, the cheerleader. If I had to choose a celeb to voice my inner monologues, it would be Beyonce, obvi.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | December 29, 2006
1. United 93. The tragic yet heroic tale of the passengers who took fate into their hands on Sept. 11, 2001, and overpowered their hijackers is the best movie of the year. We all know, or think we know, the story: Citizens unite when they learn terrorists plan to use their plane as a suicide bomb. But the movie also boldly examines the U.S. authorities' inept attempt to frame an effective response. And even more than a blend of tribute and cautionary tale, the film becomes a flight of realistic poetry.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.