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By Stephanie Isberg and Stephanie Isberg,MOUNT HEBRON HIGH SCHOOL | March 18, 2004
A brilliant spotlight illuminated a water pump, standing alone on the darkened stage. This humble fixture remained center stage, a silent testimony to the power of love in the story of Helen Keller and Annie Sullivan presented by Chesapeake High School in its production of The Miracle Worker. As Helen Keller, Emily Morgan maintained the unseeing stare of a deaf and blind woman throughout the show; she did not react to movement save the touch of her fellow actors. Her intense desire for contact shone through her every movement, however.
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By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,Special to The Sun | September 7, 2007
2nd Star Productions grabs the audience with The Miracle Worker, honestly retelling the story of Helen Keller and the teacher who releases the little girl from her silent, dark prison. The play dramatizes two weeks in the life of 7-year-old Helen, who is trapped in her own deaf and blind world until Annie Sullivan, 20, arrives in Alabama from her studies at a school for the blind in Boston. For many of us, Anne Bancroft defined the role of Annie Sullivan, first in her 1960 Tony Award-winning stage performance and later in her 1962 Oscar-winning film portrayal.
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By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | August 9, 1998
"Hellen Keller: A Life," by Dorothy Herrmann. Knopf. 394 pages. $30. In the dark Alabama night, the young woman waited on the porch, holding her packed bag. Twice before, her attempts to marry her boyfriend, Peter Fagan, had been thwarted by teachers and family. This was the couple's third try. But Helen Keller would wait all night for a man who never came.Later, Keller would describe her days with Fagan, the only boyfriend she ever had, as "a little island of joy surrounded by dark waters."
FEATURES
By Gene Seymour and By Gene Seymour,NEWSDAY | June 8, 2005
NEW YORK - Anne Bancroft, who won an Academy Award for her portrayal of Helen Keller's teacher in 1962's The Miracle Worker, but cleared a place for herself in pop-culture history five years later as the alluring, embittered Mrs. Robinson in The Graduate, has died. She was 73. She died of cancer Monday at Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan, John Barlow, a spokesman for her husband, writer-director- comedian Mel Brooks, said yesterday. Throughout a career that spanned the last half of the 20th century, Ms. Bancroft won respect from both her peers and the public as one of the most versatile and resourceful actors of her generation.
NEWS
By Martha Woodall and Martha Woodall,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 10, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - Scott Stoffel, who is majoring in electrical and computer engineering at Temple University, had no trouble coming up with a topic for his required senior design project. He was studying engineering because he wanted to learn how to develop a small electronic communication device to help blind and deaf people who have trouble deciphering the tiny raised dots of Braille with their fingers. People like him. So Stoffel, 32, who is legally blind and deaf, invented what he calls a computer-automated palm Braille system to expand the communication options for the estimated 100,000 people in the United States who are deaf and blind.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | August 18, 1992
OLNEY -- In William Gibson's "The Miracle Worker," Annie Sullivan, the novice teacher hired to instruct Helen Keller, believes the key to learning is language. Instead, she learns the key is love. That's the play's real miracle.Thanks largely to MaryBeth Wise's layered portrayal of Annie, Olney Theatre's production teaches this lesson well. Among the script's creakier elements are the flashbacks in which Annie relives the painful memories of her younger brother, whose death has left her with a firm resolve never to love again.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 27, 1996
Throughout his life, Tony Hall was never able to see or hear the voices of those who cared about him the most.Deaf since birth and blind since a toddler, Mr. Hall -- who was classified as mentally retarded -- seemed destined to become another institutional statistic. But in 1984, Nancy Foster, a teacher's aide at the Maryland School for the Blind where he was a student, realized that the troubled and disruptive 12-year-old had great potential and an untapped zest for life.Born Anthony Eugene Hall in Frederick, he lived in Randallstown with Ms. Foster, initially his foster mother and later his legal guardian, until his death Friday of undetermined causes at the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,Special to The Sun | September 7, 2007
2nd Star Productions grabs the audience with The Miracle Worker, honestly retelling the story of Helen Keller and the teacher who releases the little girl from her silent, dark prison. The play dramatizes two weeks in the life of 7-year-old Helen, who is trapped in her own deaf and blind world until Annie Sullivan, 20, arrives in Alabama from her studies at a school for the blind in Boston. For many of us, Anne Bancroft defined the role of Annie Sullivan, first in her 1960 Tony Award-winning stage performance and later in her 1962 Oscar-winning film portrayal.
NEWS
By Edward John Hudak | June 25, 1991
THE FIRST TIME I saw the 1946 film, "The Best Years of Ou Lives," I thought that Harold Russell was one hell of an actor. I kept saying to myself, "Wow! This guy plays a double-arm amputee like the real McCoy. I wonder how long it took him to learn how to use those hooks?"Well, it wasn't long before I found out that it took Harold Russell about as long as it takes any ex-GI who lost both arms in World War II to get used to his prostheses because he was the real McCoy. Director William Wyler hired Russell for the part of a disabled veteran, hooks and all.Many years later, when I saw Daniel Day-Lewis portray the late Irish writer Christy Brown in "My Left Foot," I said to myself, "Wow!
FEATURES
By Gene Seymour and By Gene Seymour,NEWSDAY | June 8, 2005
NEW YORK - Anne Bancroft, who won an Academy Award for her portrayal of Helen Keller's teacher in 1962's The Miracle Worker, but cleared a place for herself in pop-culture history five years later as the alluring, embittered Mrs. Robinson in The Graduate, has died. She was 73. She died of cancer Monday at Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan, John Barlow, a spokesman for her husband, writer-director- comedian Mel Brooks, said yesterday. Throughout a career that spanned the last half of the 20th century, Ms. Bancroft won respect from both her peers and the public as one of the most versatile and resourceful actors of her generation.
NEWS
By Stephanie Isberg and Stephanie Isberg,MOUNT HEBRON HIGH SCHOOL | March 18, 2004
A brilliant spotlight illuminated a water pump, standing alone on the darkened stage. This humble fixture remained center stage, a silent testimony to the power of love in the story of Helen Keller and Annie Sullivan presented by Chesapeake High School in its production of The Miracle Worker. As Helen Keller, Emily Morgan maintained the unseeing stare of a deaf and blind woman throughout the show; she did not react to movement save the touch of her fellow actors. Her intense desire for contact shone through her every movement, however.
NEWS
By Martha Woodall and Martha Woodall,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 10, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - Scott Stoffel, who is majoring in electrical and computer engineering at Temple University, had no trouble coming up with a topic for his required senior design project. He was studying engineering because he wanted to learn how to develop a small electronic communication device to help blind and deaf people who have trouble deciphering the tiny raised dots of Braille with their fingers. People like him. So Stoffel, 32, who is legally blind and deaf, invented what he calls a computer-automated palm Braille system to expand the communication options for the estimated 100,000 people in the United States who are deaf and blind.
FEATURES
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | August 9, 1998
"Hellen Keller: A Life," by Dorothy Herrmann. Knopf. 394 pages. $30. In the dark Alabama night, the young woman waited on the porch, holding her packed bag. Twice before, her attempts to marry her boyfriend, Peter Fagan, had been thwarted by teachers and family. This was the couple's third try. But Helen Keller would wait all night for a man who never came.Later, Keller would describe her days with Fagan, the only boyfriend she ever had, as "a little island of joy surrounded by dark waters."
NEWS
June 6, 1998
Fact and fiction come alive in written wordI read a book called "The Last Battle," by C. S. Lewis. It is the last of a seven-book series called "The Chronicles of Narnia." Here's the story: Trouble comes to the land of Narnia when an ape named Shift dresses up a donkey named Puzzle as the great lion Aslan, who is the founder of all countries in his world.Puzzle gets the whole Calormene army on his side because he is dressed as the real Aslan. But Aslan gathers his own army, and the last battle of Narnia is fought.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | July 2, 1996
As the show begins, 9-year-old Amanda Bory's small hands are folded in prayer. Suddenly, hymnlike piano and voice give way to rockin' R&B, and those hands are sweeping and circling and jabbing.Her hands are singing. Her hands are signing.She's part of Children Around the World, a group of Baltimore-area children who perform to recorded music, signing the lyrics with hand signals that speak to the deaf.Their act has played on Broadway and at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., to the hearing and to the hearing-impaired.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 27, 1996
Throughout his life, Tony Hall was never able to see or hear the voices of those who cared about him the most.Deaf since birth and blind since a toddler, Mr. Hall -- who was classified as mentally retarded -- seemed destined to become another institutional statistic. But in 1984, Nancy Foster, a teacher's aide at the Maryland School for the Blind where he was a student, realized that the troubled and disruptive 12-year-old had great potential and an untapped zest for life.Born Anthony Eugene Hall in Frederick, he lived in Randallstown with Ms. Foster, initially his foster mother and later his legal guardian, until his death Friday of undetermined causes at the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center.
NEWS
June 6, 1998
Fact and fiction come alive in written wordI read a book called "The Last Battle," by C. S. Lewis. It is the last of a seven-book series called "The Chronicles of Narnia." Here's the story: Trouble comes to the land of Narnia when an ape named Shift dresses up a donkey named Puzzle as the great lion Aslan, who is the founder of all countries in his world.Puzzle gets the whole Calormene army on his side because he is dressed as the real Aslan. But Aslan gathers his own army, and the last battle of Narnia is fought.
NEWS
By BARBARA GARSON | September 23, 1992
Last month I found a message on my answering machine saying that the vice-presidential candidate of the Socialist Party had died. Could I help get his obituary into the papers? (''And by the way, you wouldn't want to run for vice president would you?'')I'm a proud, though inactive, member of the Socialist Party and I agree with its platform. Still, I hesitated to become a candidate. Could I withstand the media scrutiny?My taxes are straightforward enough; my sex life is even more boring than George Bush's.
NEWS
By BARBARA GARSON | September 23, 1992
Last month I found a message on my answering machine saying that the vice-presidential candidate of the Socialist Party had died. Could I help get his obituary into the papers? (''And by the way, you wouldn't want to run for vice president would you?'')I'm a proud, though inactive, member of the Socialist Party and I agree with its platform. Still, I hesitated to become a candidate. Could I withstand the media scrutiny?My taxes are straightforward enough; my sex life is even more boring than George Bush's.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | August 18, 1992
OLNEY -- In William Gibson's "The Miracle Worker," Annie Sullivan, the novice teacher hired to instruct Helen Keller, believes the key to learning is language. Instead, she learns the key is love. That's the play's real miracle.Thanks largely to MaryBeth Wise's layered portrayal of Annie, Olney Theatre's production teaches this lesson well. Among the script's creakier elements are the flashbacks in which Annie relives the painful memories of her younger brother, whose death has left her with a firm resolve never to love again.
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