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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | May 9, 2008
What's wrong with Helen Hunt's appearance in Then She Found Me is not that she looks terrible -- pinched emotionally as well as physically -- but that Colin Firth keeps telling her she looks wonderful. And even a Firth who's deliberately sloppy (as he is here) is not the kind of man to lose his head in love that easily. In this New York cheer-and-tearjerker, Firth plays a guy at loose ends raising two kids by writing book-flap copy, and Hunt plays a schoolteacher aching for a baby. At the beginning, Hunt marries a friend and fellow teacher (Matthew Broderick)
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | May 9, 2008
What's wrong with Helen Hunt's appearance in Then She Found Me is not that she looks terrible -- pinched emotionally as well as physically -- but that Colin Firth keeps telling her she looks wonderful. And even a Firth who's deliberately sloppy (as he is here) is not the kind of man to lose his head in love that easily. In this New York cheer-and-tearjerker, Firth plays a guy at loose ends raising two kids by writing book-flap copy, and Hunt plays a schoolteacher aching for a baby. At the beginning, Hunt marries a friend and fellow teacher (Matthew Broderick)
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NEWS
March 10, 2006
JOHN A. "Jake" JACOBSON, 58, Baltimore native son, died March 7, at his home in Los Angeles. John was the beloved son of Amelia R. Jacobson of Baltimore, brother of Lisa M. Jacobson of New York City, and husband of Anne Kurrasch Jacobson and father of Adam John Jacobson of Los Angeles. Jakes father was the late Lt. Col. Abraham Jacobson of the U.S. Army. Jake was a film and television producer and for several seasons worked on Barry Levinson's baltimore based NBC series "Homicide" : Life on the Street," and the CBS crime drama "The District.
NEWS
March 10, 2006
JOHN A. "Jake" JACOBSON, 58, Baltimore native son, died March 7, at his home in Los Angeles. John was the beloved son of Amelia R. Jacobson of Baltimore, brother of Lisa M. Jacobson of New York City, and husband of Anne Kurrasch Jacobson and father of Adam John Jacobson of Los Angeles. Jakes father was the late Lt. Col. Abraham Jacobson of the U.S. Army. Jake was a film and television producer and for several seasons worked on Barry Levinson's baltimore based NBC series "Homicide" : Life on the Street," and the CBS crime drama "The District.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 24, 1998
"Titanic," James Cameron's $200 million epic about the 1912 sea disaster, tied "Ben-Hur" for the most Oscars in history, winning 11 at last night's 70th annual Academy Awards ceremony.The blockbuster, which just last summer was rumored to be a flop in the making, won the Oscar for best picture as well as awards for: costumes, sound, sound effects editing, visual effects, original dramatic score, film editing, original song, cinematography, art direction and direction.Its 14 nominations had tied the record set by the 1950 film "All About Eve."
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 20, 1997
If there is one season finale worth going out of your way to see in a week that's wall-to-wall with them, it's "The Birth" on tonight's "Mad About You."I stopped getting excited about television moms having babies about 20 years ago when it started to become a ratings ploy pattern for May "sweeps." So, I sat down to watch this episode armed and dangerously cynical.I walked away a believer -- believing Paul Reiser & Co. might just make this baby thing work. "The Birth" is funny, irreverent and sophisticated, with only one moment of over-the-top schmaltz near the end.It is not the funniest sitcom episode of the year.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Film Critic | December 25, 1997
Take a gay artist, a harried single mom, a grouchy romance novelist and an incontinent dog, take them on the road, and what do you get? High jinks, of course, with plenty of cheap laughs and a romantic interlude or two along the way. Here we go again, right? But wait. The romantic comedy "As Good As it Gets" may have a suspicious set-up, but it's from the Toscanini of the genre, James L. Brooks, the guy who gave us "Terms of Endearment," "Broadcast News." In the hands of such a virtuoso, this dangerously formulaic premise becomes a fresh new take on finding love late in life.
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By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,Sun Staff | May 2, 1999
Author and makeup expert Paula Begoun is a cosmetic consumer crusader.The fourth edition of her book, "Don't Go to the Cosmetics Counter Without Me" (Beginning Press; $19.95), is a comprehensive review of nearly 200 cosmetic brands from Avon to Zia.Her intention: to act as an objective 0 000 guardian against the outrageous claims and prices of the cosmetic industry."Getting ripped off and wasting money is not beautiful," she says.Begoun, a former makeup artist who spends a lot of time reading up on the effects of chemicals commonly used in makeup, bases her evaluations on ingredient labels.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | February 23, 1995
Tonight's TV is as easy to recommend as it is to watch. Just tune to NBC at 8, and stay tuned for the full three hours of prime time.That'll get you two episodes of "Friends," one episode each of "Mad About You," "Seinfeld" and "E.R.," and help you avoid the CBS "Simon & Simon" reunion made-for-TV movie in its entirety.* "Mad About You" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., Channel 11) -- Just in case you're sampling one or more of tonight's NBC series for the first time, here's a bare-bones rundown of how the Thursday-night series relate to one another -- especially tonight.
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By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2002
Helen Hunt, Renee Zellweger and Marisa Tomei led the posse of A-list actresses who showed up in simple black gowns. The evening's stunners tended to be feminine and flattering instead of revealing and risque. And obscure fashion statements like Bjork's swan frock from last year were noticeably absent. As Hollywood's glitterati sashayed down the red carpet at the 74th Academy Awards last night, the plethora of gorgeous ballgowns and ooh-la-la slinky dresses gave some hint that things have crept back to normal in post-Sept.
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By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2002
Helen Hunt, Renee Zellweger and Marisa Tomei led the posse of A-list actresses who showed up in simple black gowns. The evening's stunners tended to be feminine and flattering instead of revealing and risque. And obscure fashion statements like Bjork's swan frock from last year were noticeably absent. As Hollywood's glitterati sashayed down the red carpet at the 74th Academy Awards last night, the plethora of gorgeous ballgowns and ooh-la-la slinky dresses gave some hint that things have crept back to normal in post-Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,Special to the Sun | August 19, 2001
NEW YORK -- Woody Allen is replaying the last few seconds before he spilled a pitcher of milk on his new shoes. He moves the containers on the coffee server like a football coach trying to figure out how a quarterback option ended in a fumble. "The mistake was," he begins a recent interview, "I was reaching for this cup and ..." His voice trails off in a sigh and he adds, "This crepuscular light." Crepuscular: of, relating to, or resembling twilight. Allen rarely plumbs Merriam-Webster, but that sort of pratfall, one he says would be perfect in his movies, is occasion enough.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rasmi Simhan and Chris Kaltenbach and Rasmi Simhan and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2000
After a disappointing summer where the only real standouts were "The Perfect Storm," which made a star of the weather, and Clint Eastwood's "Space Cowboys," about four geriatric astronauts, movie audiences are left with only one hope: That Hollywood was holding back its best stuff for after Labor Day. At least in recent years, that's been the pattern, as major studios wait until the last three months of the year to release any film with a remote chance...
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 15, 1999
She's an illiterate teen-age runaway who hears voices and has visions. She also has a lot of unresolved gender issues.Sounds like just the gal I want leading my troops into battle against a British occupying army.But there you are. She did all right for the French some 550 years ago -- before getting burned at the stake, that is. The French handed over control of the military to 16-year-old Joan d'Arc, a peasant girl who claimed to be in constant conversation with a couple of Catholic saints, and, what do you know, a few years later, the British are gone and France is reunited.
NEWS
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,Sun Staff | May 2, 1999
Author and makeup expert Paula Begoun is a cosmetic consumer crusader.The fourth edition of her book, "Don't Go to the Cosmetics Counter Without Me" (Beginning Press; $19.95), is a comprehensive review of nearly 200 cosmetic brands from Avon to Zia.Her intention: to act as an objective 0 000 guardian against the outrageous claims and prices of the cosmetic industry."Getting ripped off and wasting money is not beautiful," she says.Begoun, a former makeup artist who spends a lot of time reading up on the effects of chemicals commonly used in makeup, bases her evaluations on ingredient labels.
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By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 22, 1999
The mounting tension. The unexpected disaster. The potential for an over-the-top spectacle. The strutting stars. The chance to decide who's a winner and who's a loser. It's a night of pure drama, of sublime comedy, a roller-coaster ride of the powerful raised high and brought low.We're talking Oscar Night, of course. But not the Academy Awards. Let's face it: After they announce the half-dozen Big Ones, who cares about the winners of the Best Lighting or Best Sound-Effects Editing Awards?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rasmi Simhan and Chris Kaltenbach and Rasmi Simhan and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2000
After a disappointing summer where the only real standouts were "The Perfect Storm," which made a star of the weather, and Clint Eastwood's "Space Cowboys," about four geriatric astronauts, movie audiences are left with only one hope: That Hollywood was holding back its best stuff for after Labor Day. At least in recent years, that's been the pattern, as major studios wait until the last three months of the year to release any film with a remote chance...
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | March 31, 1998
BOSTON -- Too bad they don't have an Oscar for the Single Best Line in a movie. A Zeitgeist award for the sentence you want to freeze-frame, the magical moment when Hollywood fantasy meets daily life, when they get it absolutely right.Helen Hunt and Jack Nicholson picked up a couple of statues last week for Best Actress and Best Actor in "As Good as It Gets." But the Best Line prize belongs to the scribbler who put a string of ungenteel words in Ms. Hunt's mouth. When the distraught mother gave her opinion about the managed medical attention being given her asthmatic son, she exploded: "F HMO B Pieces of S-!"
NEWS
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 24, 1998
"Titanic," James Cameron's $200 million epic about the 1912 sea disaster, tied "Ben-Hur" for the most Oscars in history, winning 11 at last night's 70th annual Academy Awards ceremony.The blockbuster, which just last summer was rumored to be a flop in the making, won the Oscar for best picture as well as awards for: costumes, sound, sound effects editing, visual effects, original dramatic score, film editing, original song, cinematography, art direction and direction.Its 14 nominations had tied the record set by the 1950 film "All About Eve."
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