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Helen Delich Bentley

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Candus Thomson and The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2012
Helen Delich Bentley served five terms in Congress, was chairwoman of the Federal Maritime Commission and has the Port of Baltimore named for her. So you'd think that at the National Maritime Day celebration last Saturday (5/19) in Baltimore everybody would be on board with that chunk of information, right David Matsuda? Not quite. The head of the U.S. Maritime Administration called her, “Helen Detrick Bentley,” before handing off to his boss, Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, who entered Congress in 1995, the year Bentley departed.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
A new five-year deal between the port of Baltimore and high-end automaker BMW will keep bringing an estimated $2.5 billion worth of vehicles through what is already the top auto import operation in the nation. Officials announced the extended partnership - and a large new BMW processing center at one of the port's terminals - at a waterfront gathering Thursday, saying the new facility will bolster Baltimore's dominance in the market, create 200 jobs and set the course for growth.
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BUSINESS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | June 2, 2006
The port of Baltimore was renamed last night for Helen Delich Bentley, whose work on its behalf over a half-century as a journalist, legislator and consultant was born of a devotion to the city's waterfront instilled by her mother, who'd arrived by steamship. Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. officially named the state's public marine terminals the "Helen Delich Bentley Port of Baltimore" yesterday evening, creating a permanent legacy for the former congresswoman. The governor made the announcement at the South Locust Point cruise ship terminal during the port of Baltimore's 300th anniversary fundraising gala, the centerpiece of a campaign to raise the profile of the industrial facility that employs thousands and contributes millions of dollars to the economy.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2014
David A. Wagner, former deputy secretary of the Maryland Department of Transportation who later headed the Maryland Port Administration, died April 7 of cancer at his home in Mandeville, La. The longtime Pasadena resident was 71. "Dave was a good administrator, and he was a detail guy. He was well liked by his employees and those who worked with him," said Helen Delich Bentley, the former congresswoman and chairman of the Federal Maritime Commission....
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | January 16, 2010
Irvin F. Kemp Jr., a retired WMAR-TV film editor whose career spanned more than 30 years, died Jan. 9 of lung cancer at his Parkville home. He was 84. Mr. Kemp, the son of a plumber and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute, Mr. Kemp was drafted into the Army in 1942. He served as a military policeman, as part of an engineering unit and as a truck driver in Europe. He was discharged in 1946. After the war, Mr. Kemp went to work as a machinist in the experimental laboratory at the old Glenn L. Martin Co. plant in Middle River.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 2, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Three Maryland members of the House of Representatives and 82 of their colleagues each picked up more than $1 million in political action committee money during the past decade, according to a study by Common Cause, which urged Congress to "dramatically reduce" the influence of special interest contributions.4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .% from. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .From PACs . . . PACs . . . ElectedTom McMillen, D-Md.-4th . . . $1,108,996. . . 49. . . . 1986Helen Delich Bentley, R-Md.
NEWS
June 5, 2006
First, let's acknowledge a bias: We are fond of Helen Delich Bentley. There is no more tireless crusader for Baltimore's maritime interests than the 82-year-old former congresswoman. It is a role that has sometimes put her at odds with Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s Transportation Department. No surprise there: Mrs. Bentley has never been a shrinking violet - whether she was covering the port for The Sun (where she got her start 60 years ago) or defending it today. But at a black-tie celebration of the port's 300th anniversary last week, Mr. Ehrlich announced that he had decided to rename Baltimore's port the Helen Delich Bentley Port of Baltimore.
NEWS
By DON C. FORESTER | July 20, 1991
My zoology laboratory assistant is a bright young Republican by the name of Tom Kuhar. Tom's mother happens to work for Representative Helen Delich Bentley. Some months ago, an undergraduate student gave me a female Black Widow spider he had collected in Southern Maryland. Since Tom has an interest in invertebrates, I asked him to set up a cage featuring the spider.You can imagine my amusement when I saw the finished product -- a 10-gallon aquarium complete with water dish, leaf litter and a large identification card.
NEWS
December 7, 2012
The Sun obituary about Dr. Mildred Otenasek (Nov. 26) failed to mention one very important civic contribution back in 1955 and 1956. Then-Gov. Theodore McKeldin included Dr. Otanesek on the committee to change the Port of Baltimore and make it more competitive with neighboring ports. Even though she then was the Democratic National Committeewoman, she never once played politics but stepped in full tilt to learn about the problem - how railroad ownership and control of Baltimore's port inhibited it from competing with the other East Coast ports - and she expended every effort to help establish a public agency to take over.
NEWS
By Duncan L. Hunter | November 25, 2013
The place was the U.S. House of Representatives. The time was the mid-1980s. I was a relative newcomer to Congress from California, and the Republican conference was hosting President Ronald Reagan. The president, beloved by the members, was coasting through a question-and-answer session, fielding the mostly "softball" questions with his legendary charm. Then Helen Delich Bentley, even more of a newcomer than I, stepped to the microphone. Her question was typical Bentley - blunt and reflective of the interests of the blue collar folks she represented.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
The port of Baltimore's continuing labor dispute, which boiled over in a three-day dockworkers strike in October before a three-month "cooling-off" period, now simmers with uncertainty. Labor peace in the port seems precarious. A contract covering the handling of vehicles and other local matters has expired, and workers voted down a new contract. The union says it won't strike and management says it won't lock out the dockworkers. The only certainty is that the port has lost work, and some of it might never return, port officials said.
NEWS
By Duncan L. Hunter | November 25, 2013
The place was the U.S. House of Representatives. The time was the mid-1980s. I was a relative newcomer to Congress from California, and the Republican conference was hosting President Ronald Reagan. The president, beloved by the members, was coasting through a question-and-answer session, fielding the mostly "softball" questions with his legendary charm. Then Helen Delich Bentley, even more of a newcomer than I, stepped to the microphone. Her question was typical Bentley - blunt and reflective of the interests of the blue collar folks she represented.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
Julio T. "Speedy" Gonzalez, who had been honorary consul to El Salvador and a successful Baltimore shipping executive whose motto was "My sales territory is the entire world," died Thursday from complications of diabetes at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 88. "Everyone knew Speedy because he was active in the port and attended all port events," said Helen Delich Bentley, the former congresswoman and chairwoman of the Federal Maritime Commission. "It was a small company but very active.
NEWS
December 7, 2012
The Sun obituary about Dr. Mildred Otenasek (Nov. 26) failed to mention one very important civic contribution back in 1955 and 1956. Then-Gov. Theodore McKeldin included Dr. Otanesek on the committee to change the Port of Baltimore and make it more competitive with neighboring ports. Even though she then was the Democratic National Committeewoman, she never once played politics but stepped in full tilt to learn about the problem - how railroad ownership and control of Baltimore's port inhibited it from competing with the other East Coast ports - and she expended every effort to help establish a public agency to take over.
BUSINESS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2012
The Baltimore Sun's front page on July 22, 1959, carried the news accompanied by a six-column photo: The world's first nuclear-powered cargo ship had been launched at Camden, N.J. The christening of the $47 million N/S Savannah was bigger than news about legislation to extend the GI Bill of Rights, bigger than a Cape Canaveral rocket launch, bigger, even, than a federal court ruling to allow the steamy novel "Lady Chatterley's Lover" to be sent...
FEATURES
Candus Thomson and The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2012
Helen Delich Bentley served five terms in Congress, was chairwoman of the Federal Maritime Commission and has the Port of Baltimore named for her. So you'd think that at the National Maritime Day celebration last Saturday (5/19) in Baltimore everybody would be on board with that chunk of information, right David Matsuda? Not quite. The head of the U.S. Maritime Administration called her, “Helen Detrick Bentley,” before handing off to his boss, Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, who entered Congress in 1995, the year Bentley departed.
NEWS
June 9, 2006
Bentley deserves honor of port name Kudos to Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. for the well-deserved honor he bestowed on Helen Delich Bentley by naming the port of Baltimore in her honor. And shame on The Sun's editorial board for its response to this grand gesture ("Name-dropping," editorial, June 5). Those of us who have been privileged to know Mrs. Bentley for many years know that there is no more fitting tribute to this great lady than to have the port that she has served for nearly six decades bear her name.
NEWS
March 15, 1998
As season begins, let's put aside Orioles grudgesWith a new season opening at Camden Yards on March 31, it is time to put aside the acrimony of the 1997 postseason and begin again our march toward a world championship for which Peter G. Angelos has worked since the day he acquired the team.Much has been made of the fact that Mr. Angelos is a self-made man who started with nothing. That is simply not true.While his family had few financial resources, their real wealth consisted of a determined commitment to live the American dream, persevering, overcoming adversity and believing in the value of family, church and the community.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2010
Capt. Emanuele Lorenzo DiCasagrande, vice president of Mediterranean Shipping Co. who played a key role in making Baltimore a major national container port, died Friday of lung cancer at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center in Bel Air. He was 69. "Captain DiCasagrande was an icon in the port of Baltimore, and we've lost a good man," said James J. White, executive director of the Maryland Port Administration. "He played a major part in making our port somewhere between the 13 t h and 15 t h in the country in containerization, and he deserves a lot, if not most, of the credit," he said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | January 16, 2010
Irvin F. Kemp Jr., a retired WMAR-TV film editor whose career spanned more than 30 years, died Jan. 9 of lung cancer at his Parkville home. He was 84. Mr. Kemp, the son of a plumber and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute, Mr. Kemp was drafted into the Army in 1942. He served as a military policeman, as part of an engineering unit and as a truck driver in Europe. He was discharged in 1946. After the war, Mr. Kemp went to work as a machinist in the experimental laboratory at the old Glenn L. Martin Co. plant in Middle River.
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