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Helen Bentley

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By DAN BERGER | February 19, 1992
Run, Mario, run!At least now all the students in New Hampshire can get back to class.If a dimly lit, dehumanized, brutalistic parking garage is not safe, what is?Helen Bentley, it says, is running scared. Helen Bentley has not been scared in 68 years.
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NEWS
December 1, 2013
I appreciate the flattering article that my friend, Duncan Hunter Sr., had published in The Sun on Tuesday ( "Helen Bentley is still tough and kind today," Nov. 26). However, there are a couple of facts I would like to straighten out. In the discussion with President Ronald Reagan that Mr. Hunter recounted, I was pushing for all blue collar workers, not just maritime workers. In the discussion with Admiral William Crowe, chief of naval operations, who presented to the entire House of Representatives about the Soviet might (the Cold War was on)
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | November 11, 1993
Helen Bentley wants to be governor until she is 79, and wh not?Walt Disney plans to put a fantasy mall in the Washington suburbs to compete for tourists with the one the federal government runs downtown.
NEWS
By Duncan L. Hunter | November 25, 2013
The place was the U.S. House of Representatives. The time was the mid-1980s. I was a relative newcomer to Congress from California, and the Republican conference was hosting President Ronald Reagan. The president, beloved by the members, was coasting through a question-and-answer session, fielding the mostly "softball" questions with his legendary charm. Then Helen Delich Bentley, even more of a newcomer than I, stepped to the microphone. Her question was typical Bentley - blunt and reflective of the interests of the blue collar folks she represented.
NEWS
December 15, 2006
Shirley A. Hull, a retired bank worker and secretary who had been active in Republican politics, died of a heart attack Sunday at her Forest Hill home. She was 67. Born Shirley A. Roberts in Baltimore, she was raised on Valley Street. She was a 1957 graduate of Seton High School and attended business school for two years. She worked for Equitable Trust Co. and Maryland National Bank for 30 years in customer records and computer programming. After leaving the bank in the early 1990s, she worked as a secretary and in the financial operations of Helen Bentley & Associates in Lutherville, a firm headed by former Rep. Helen Delich Bentley.
NEWS
December 16, 1991
Rep. Helen Bentley last week proclaimed 1991 as the year the Port of Baltimore began to reverse its long decline. That's an optimistic message, but there is evidence to support the claim. For the first time in recent memory, the good news from the port has outnumbered the stories of labor unrest or departing shipping lines. Some contracts -- notably the Maersk Line's 10-year lease and the deal that lured the Orient Overseas Container Line back from Hampton Roads, Va. -- represent major successes.
NEWS
November 11, 1991
In hard times, schools need help, not vitriolSen. Thomas Bromwell's recent letter about the Baltimore County public schools goes well beyond his usual posturing and ends up in the exact "gutter" he accuses schools Superintendent Robert Y. Dubel of occupying.Here are the facts:The "parasitic, privileged . . . over-indulged and bloated bureaucracy" to which Bromwell refers actually ranks 22nd of the 24 school systems in the state with regard to the ratio of central office employees to school-based employees.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | June 22, 1994
ANNAPOLIS -- When she first ran for public office in 1986, Kathleen Kennedy Townsend did not yet exist.She was just Kathleen Townsend then, no middle name. And she did not want to talk about her father, the late Robert F. Kennedy.She was running for Congress on her own, thank you very much, and needed no family connections to gain victory.A position she held right up until a flock of family members descended upon her to point out that as long as you are going to get the downside of being a Kennedy, which is constant scrutiny, you might as well exploit the upside, which is star quality.
NEWS
October 22, 2002
Back the plan to bring better transit to region We were pleased to read that Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend understands the critical role of transit in improving Maryland's transportation system ("Townsend offers proposal for D.C.-area transportation," Oct. 3). In fact, the new Baltimore Region Rail System Plan adopted by the Maryland Transit Administration offers the first clear blueprint in decades for bringing a world-class transit system to Baltimore. After years of lagging far behind our neighbor to the south, we finally have hope of achieving the convenience, choice, time savings and environmental benefits that come from better transit.
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | May 21, 1995
A wrenching drama for the heart of the state Republican Party is about to resume. Call it Act II.Act I happened last year when arch-conservative Ellen Sauerbrey trounced mainstream conservative Helen Bentley in the Republican primary for governor. As a result, Ms. Sauerbrey is now titular head of the Maryland GOP.She is a flag-waving supporter of Sen. Phil Gramm for president and is heading his efforts in Maryland. Her considerable army of supporters is in the Gramm camp. He's their kind of true conservative.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2013
Connie Morella served as an ambassador in Paris. Helen Bentley became a consultant to the port of Baltimore. Wayne Gilchrest opened an environmental education center on the Eastern Shore. Former members of Congress from Maryland, they rebounded from election losses to find new ways to continue their service. And several of them now report a kind of relief at having left the endless fundraising, the unrelenting schedule and the partisan rancor behind. "When you take inventory, after you've been through it all, you'll find that life is quite nice," says Morella, 81, the Montgomery County Republican who spent 16 years in the House and now heads a bipartisan organization of former lawmakers.
BUSINESS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2012
The Baltimore Sun's front page on July 22, 1959, carried the news accompanied by a six-column photo: The world's first nuclear-powered cargo ship had been launched at Camden, N.J. The christening of the $47 million N/S Savannah was bigger than news about legislation to extend the GI Bill of Rights, bigger than a Cape Canaveral rocket launch, bigger, even, than a federal court ruling to allow the steamy novel "Lady Chatterley's Lover" to be sent...
FEATURES
Candus Thomson and The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2012
Helen Delich Bentley served five terms in Congress, was chairwoman of the Federal Maritime Commission and has the Port of Baltimore named for her. So you'd think that at the National Maritime Day celebration last Saturday (5/19) in Baltimore everybody would be on board with that chunk of information, right David Matsuda? Not quite. The head of the U.S. Maritime Administration called her, “Helen Detrick Bentley,” before handing off to his boss, Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, who entered Congress in 1995, the year Bentley departed.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | January 16, 2010
Irvin F. Kemp Jr., a retired WMAR-TV film editor whose career spanned more than 30 years, died Jan. 9 of lung cancer at his Parkville home. He was 84. Mr. Kemp, the son of a plumber and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute, Mr. Kemp was drafted into the Army in 1942. He served as a military policeman, as part of an engineering unit and as a truck driver in Europe. He was discharged in 1946. After the war, Mr. Kemp went to work as a machinist in the experimental laboratory at the old Glenn L. Martin Co. plant in Middle River.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | October 24, 2007
Mary A. Pyles, a well-known veteran Dundalk political campaign director who also enjoyed sewing theatrical costumes, died of renal failure Sunday at her grandson's home in Englewood, Fla. She was 87. Mary Ann Zinach was born in Slovan, Pa., the seventh of 12 children. She was the daughter of Serbian immigrant parents, and later moved with her family to Weirton, W.Va., where she graduated from high school and attended community college. In 1939, she married Ralph Pyles; seven years later, the couple moved to Dundalk when they both took jobs at Bethlehem Steel's Sparrows Point plant.
NEWS
December 15, 2006
Shirley A. Hull, a retired bank worker and secretary who had been active in Republican politics, died of a heart attack Sunday at her Forest Hill home. She was 67. Born Shirley A. Roberts in Baltimore, she was raised on Valley Street. She was a 1957 graduate of Seton High School and attended business school for two years. She worked for Equitable Trust Co. and Maryland National Bank for 30 years in customer records and computer programming. After leaving the bank in the early 1990s, she worked as a secretary and in the financial operations of Helen Bentley & Associates in Lutherville, a firm headed by former Rep. Helen Delich Bentley.
NEWS
March 2, 1997
Record needs straightening on GOP racesBarry Rascovar's comments on the GOP gubernatorial primary contest ("The GOP's questers should think again," Feb. 9) contained two misleading statements and an element of truth.First, it was Ellen Sauerbrey, not Helen Bentley, who first entered the 1994 gubernatorial race.Second, the populist opposition to the selection of Bobby Neall as state senator was motivated more by his perceived ethical obtusity than by ideology. These concerns were raised in The Sun only after his selection was a fait accompli.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 12, 1994
Will the policy of Baltimore's new police commissioner to have officers change posts every few years, regardless of performance, lead to an exodus of experienced cops?Here's a partial answer: Gary Childs is gone. Yesterday was his first day on the job as an investigator for the Carroll County state's attorney.For the last several years, he had been one of the city's top detectives, solving dozens of murders and logging amazing numbers of hours chasing good and bad leads on countless cases.
BUSINESS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | June 2, 2006
The port of Baltimore was renamed last night for Helen Delich Bentley, whose work on its behalf over a half-century as a journalist, legislator and consultant was born of a devotion to the city's waterfront instilled by her mother, who'd arrived by steamship. Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. officially named the state's public marine terminals the "Helen Delich Bentley Port of Baltimore" yesterday evening, creating a permanent legacy for the former congresswoman. The governor made the announcement at the South Locust Point cruise ship terminal during the port of Baltimore's 300th anniversary fundraising gala, the centerpiece of a campaign to raise the profile of the industrial facility that employs thousands and contributes millions of dollars to the economy.
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