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By Steve McKerrow | March 6, 1991
The idea of genuine nobility among thieves may be too generous a concept. But there is craftsmanship, camaraderie and a sometimes brutal code that says, "Loyalty ends where inconvenience begins."Such is the thrust, anyway, of "The $10 Million Getaway," the latest USA cable network world premiere movie, at 9 tonight on the basic service. Starring John Mahoney, Tony Lo Bianco and Karen Young, it's an ironic crime caper film based upon the celebrated actual robbery of a Lufthansa Airlines cargo hold at New York's Kennedy Airport, in December 1978.
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By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
The couple walked into Kent Island Jewelry first. She wore dark sunglasses, scrubs and a stethoscope draped around her neck. He was well-dressed and meticulously groomed. Trailing them was another man, in work clothes. He was looking for something special for his mother's wedding gift. "He ran me all over the store," shop owner Patricia Clowd recalled. Clowd and police now say the hunt for the perfect gift was a distraction, providing the dapper Robert Weathers an opportunity to grab a tray of diamonds from an unlocked case.
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FEATURES
November 9, 2001
Rated R (language, some violence). Sun score: ** 1/2 Heist is like an improved and streamlined version of last summer's The Score: The writer-director, David Mamet, doesn't even want The to slow down his title. Gene Hackman stars as the canny thief who leads a lean, efficient crew including a stalwart partner (Delroy Lindo), an ace odd-job guy (Ricky Jay) and sometimes his svelte young wife (Rebecca Pidgeon). When his financier and fence (Danny DeVito) reneges on a pay-off unless Hackman's crew pulls another job, the screen is set for a game of cat and mouse.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
After nearly two months on the run, a couple wanted in jewelry store heists around Baltimore County and several states as far as South Carolina, was arrested at a hotel room off U.S. 40 in Catonsville Monday, police said. Robert Antoine Weathers, 53, and Robin Tracy Nelson, 50, are charged in multiple thefts at local jewelry and liquor stores around Baltimore County, including Bijoux Jewels in May, police said. On Wednesday, police identified a third suspect in the Bijoux as Stanley William Lester Gwynn of Elkridge.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Patrick S. Pemberton and Patrick S. Pemberton,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | December 9, 2004
Writing a heist flick isn't so tough. Start with a team of criminals (usually all male): There's the safe cracker (usually the most likable character - and the movie's biggest star), the computer expert (typically the nerd with a few funny lines) and the explosives guy (usually the loose cannon, who almost screws it all up). Then define the prize - diamonds are always good, though famous paintings add a little class - and make sure one of the guys has a love interest who wants him to give up his life of crime.
FEATURES
By HAL BOEDEKER and HAL BOEDEKER,ORLANDO SENTINEL | March 22, 2006
The schedule overflows with crime drama, but networks keep adding to the glut. Two newcomers face off tonight in the same time slot dominated by CSI: NY on CBS. NBC goes the jokey route with the annoying Heist, and ABC takes the serious path in The Evidence with ho-hum results. The Evidence presents detectives as heroes, and Heist celebrates criminals. No matter which side of the law they're on, the characters still have to grip the viewer. Both programs mostly fumble that challenge. Heist is the riskier show, because it unfolds as a sprawling serial in the manner of 24 and Prison Break.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 24, 2006
Spike Lee grafts his unique sensibilities onto a pretty conventional bank heist plot with Inside Man. The results are mixed; some of Lee's cinematic tricks seem simply out of place. But look past the occasional slip, and what emerges is a slick, briskly paced tale of bank robbers who think they're at least half-again as smart as everybody else, and maybe are. Lee, working off a screenplay from first-timer Russell Gewirtz, certainly benefits from his continued good standing within Hollywood's acting community.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 8, 2000
LONDON - As an attempted heist, the plan was ingenious. Bust into the Millennium Dome aboard a stolen bulldozer, loot $500 million in diamonds, and make a clean getaway in a speed boat docked on the Thames River. There were only two teeny, tiny problems - the police were tipped off and the jewels were fakes. So went yesterday's gang-that-couldn't-shoot-straight bid to pull off the world's biggest robbery as police lay in wait, snuffed out the audacious plot and rounded up suspects, eventually arresting 12 people.
FEATURES
December 3, 2007
Critic's Pick -- Brenda (Kyra Sedgwick) searches for a gang that killed two guards during an armored-car heist in a holiday-themed The Closer (8 p.m., TNT).
NEWS
September 4, 2004
On September 1, 2004, ALVIN D. KINNEAR; beloved husband of Catherine D. Kinnear; devoted father of Sandra L. Van de Castle, Patricia A. Heist, Catherine D. Meyers, Steven D. Kinnear, Mitchell W. Kinnear and his wife Patty, Gordon S. Kinnear and Mark A. Kinnear; cherished grandfather of Jacob W. Kinnear, Matthew A. Kinnear, Anne Marie May, Edward J. Van de Castle, III, Charles Heist, Rebecca Kinnear, and Stephanie Kinnear and dear great grandfather of...
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2013
Howard County police are searching for a man who robbed an Ellicott City bank at gunpoint on Monday. The suspect, described as roughly 6 feet tall and about 170 pounds, walked into a PNC Bank in the 4300 block of Montgomery Rd. just before 5 p.m. and pointed a handgun at the bank teller, demanding money. No one was injured. Police said the teller gave the man cash, and the suspect, who wore a knit hat covering his face, along with a tan hooded jacket over his shoulders and dark jeans, left the bank.
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By Richard A. Serrano, The Los Angeles Times | December 24, 2013
A bank robbery suspect from South Florida was arrested by FBI agents after a string of approximately 20 heists along the Eastern Seaboard that included the September robbery of a PNC Bank in Catonsville, authorities announced Tuesday. Officials said Luis A. Alomar, 37, was arrested about 2:30 a.m. Tuesday in the Long Island suburb of Medford, N.Y. He was being held on state and federal charges in connection with the robberies, which began in August. Agents said Alomar used firearms or threatening notes to carry out the crimes.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
Bruce Reynolds nearly got away with it — and for a time he did. As the brains behind England's 1963 "Great Train Robbery," Reynolds netted some $7 million in small bills for himself and his confederates. Robbing stagecoaches and, later, trains became a fashionable and lucrative pursuit for such 19th-century outlaws as Jesse James, Bill Miner, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, and it once had been part of life in the rugged Old West, where travelers boarding steam cars did so at their own risk.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2013
A federal judge sentenced two partners in an armored-car stick up crew to 32 years and a day each in prison. Erick Wilson, 28 from Columbia and David Marquise Howard, 29, from Baltimore held up employees of Dunbar Armored at gunpoint, stealing cash from them. The robberies, carried out in Maryland and Washington, D.C., took place between 2008 and 2011, earning the pair and their crew $765,000. Wilson was sentenced Wednesday and Howard Tuesday. Both pleaded guilty to six robberies.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2012
A 21-year-old Baltimore man who participated in the armed robbery of jewelry stores in Baltimore and Columbia in 2010 and 2011 was sentenced on Thursday to more than 13 years in prison, according to the Maryland U.S. attorney's office. Deontaye Harvey, of West Baltimore, will also have to pay thousands of dollars in restitution to the jewelry stores he robbed at Mondawmin Mall and the Mall in Columbia, prosecutors said. In the first incident, on Sept. 19, 2010, Harvey entered Elite Gold & Diamonds at the Mondawmin Mall with an unidentified man, took out a gun and said, "Give us what you got," to an employee, prosecutors said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2012
"Breaking Bad" could have mined the familiar territory of rapidly deteriorating relationships all the way to the finish line, but that would have felt too easy and lopsided. Last week, after Skyler channeled Virginia Woolf and made a slow walk into a swimming pool her most obvious cry for help, it was time for "Breaking Bad" to get back to its increasingly complicated drug business.  When Walt "defeated" Gus, he believed he had conquered the biggest hurdle to controlling the Southwest meth trade.
NEWS
July 9, 2006
On July 6, 2006, ADAM PAUL; loving son of Sterling and Brenda Klank; cherished grandson of Earl and Ramona Heist, Richard Klank and Barbara Wright; beloved brother of Emily Klank; dear nephew of Lee and Deborah Steelwright, Terry Wright, Kenneth and Darlene Crowl, Stephen and Karen Propalis, David and Carolyn Propalis, Steve and Miriam Palandati and Aaron Heist. Also survived by a host of loving cousins. The family will receive friends in the Lemmon Funeral Home of Dulaney Valley Inc., 10 W. Padonia Road, Timonium, MD 21093 on Sunday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. A Funeral Service will be celebrated in the funeral home on Monday, July 10 at 1 P.M. Interment Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | February 8, 2012
The big news on Tuesday was the guilty plea from Barry H. Landau, who admitted in federal court to pilfering thousands of historic documents from Baltimore and four other states. He and his accomplice were caught last year when an alert part-time, and suspicious, librarian hid on a balcony and spotted one of them hiding a document. Read the story here . View a photo gallery of Landau walking into court and of documents taken from the Maryland Historical Society.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | November 10, 2011
The thieves in "Tower Heist" may have a skyscraper-dwelling rich guy as their target, but the movie itself is reaching into your wallet. It's such a crassly commercial action-comedy that you won't be surprised to learn that its tower ing aspirations only involve box office gross. What ultimately matters is entertainment value, of course, and on that count the movie is so relentlessly busy that it will hold your attention. Movie stars, tall buildings, piles of money and even the Macy's Thanksgiving Day parade will keep your eyes on the screen.
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