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NEWS
By Cox News Service | August 30, 1993
WACO, Texas -- Vernon Howell's legacy includes four children by three women other than his legal wife, Rachel, according to a Waco attorney investigating the cult leader's heirs.The legal record will soon reflect her findings.Mr. Howell, his wife, and their three children, Cyrus, 8, Star, 5, and Bobbie Lane, 2, died in the April 19 fire that destroyed Mount Carmel.Attorney Kathryn Gilliam said Mr. Howell's mother, Bonnie Haldeman, admitted after initial reluctance that four of her son's children are living.
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FEATURES
Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2014
Chump change it ain't. With a net worth estimated at a cool $2.1 billion, Baltimore's Blaustein brood ranks as number 108 on Forbes' magazine's list of the 185 richest families in America, worth a combined $1.2 trillion. The only Charm City clan to make the list, the Blausteins made their bucks in the early 20th century, according to the Blaustein Philanthropic Group's website. It seems that Louis, a Lithuanian immigrant, and his son, Jacob, teamed up to deliver kerosene in a horse-drawn wagon through the streets of Baltimore.  In 1910, the pair named their fledgling business the American Oil Company -- Or Amoco.
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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,Sun Columnist | September 19, 2006
For years, those who inherited a 401(k) from a parent or partner were left with something else: a big tax bill. That's because employers typically cashed out the account, and all at once heirs owed income tax on the money. Only surviving spouses could avoid an immediate tax hit by rolling the money into an individual retirement account. But tax relief is on the way in the new pension law. Beginning next year, children, domestic partners and anyone else who inherits a 401(k) from someone other than a spouse will be able to transfer the money directly into an IRA. They can then take distributions from the IRA based on their life expectancy, which can be many years.
FEATURES
By Jake Nevins, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
You could call it the house that canned spaghetti built, but the Penderyn Estate in Queenstown is grander than that. The 22,500-square-foot mansion was built in 1989 for Mario Boiardi, a Mid-Atlantic businessman and son of Hector Boiardi, the New York City chef who created the Chef Boyardee brand of products. The property, originally listed for $29 million, will be auctioned July 19 by DeCaro Luxury Real Estate Auctions. Mario Boiardi, who died in 2007, and his wife, Maureen, sold the home to Morgan O'Brien , the former CEO of Nextel.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | March 5, 1998
Relatives of Elizabeth C. "Nancy" Smith are suing a Baltimore bank, alleging that someone forged almost $20,000 worth of checks drawn on her account.Baltimore attorney Frederick Steinmann filed the suit this week in Howard County Circuit Court on behalf of Smith's two heirs -- Jane P. Nes and Ruth B. McClees, both of Baltimore -- against First National Bank of Maryland.Smith died last February without a will, leaving the fate of her 300 acres in the middle of Columbia up in the air. The land is worth an estimated $8 million.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1998
For all practical purposes, Howard County has $8 million in hand to buy the 300-acre Smith Farm in Columbia. The problem is that no one knows how much the land is worth, or even if it is for sale.Yesterday, Gov. Parris N. Glendening announced the commitment of $4 million in state money to purchase the farm along Route 175. The state's money will come from program open space funds. The money will be matched by $4 million that County Executive Charles I. Ecker has said the county will pay for buying the land and turning it into a park.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,SUN STAFF | May 24, 1996
Maryland Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend urged 305 Howard Community College graduates yesterday to remember they "are heirs to a revolution" and to get involved and make a difference in the world."
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2012
Johns Hopkins University's motion to dismiss a family's lawsuit over development plans for a Montgomery County farm was denied Friday evening, according to the plaintiffs. The suit claims that Hopkins' plan to construct high-rise buildings on the land violates an agreement the land's previous owner entered into with the university more than twenty years ago, according to a statement from plaintiffs, led by John Timothy Newell. Elizabeth Beall Banks and her siblings transferred the 138-acre Belward Farm to Hopkins with the expectation that development of the land, near Gaithersburg, would be limited to a low-rise campus.
FEATURES
Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2014
Chump change it ain't. With a net worth estimated at a cool $2.1 billion, Baltimore's Blaustein brood ranks as number 108 on Forbes' magazine's list of the 185 richest families in America, worth a combined $1.2 trillion. The only Charm City clan to make the list, the Blausteins made their bucks in the early 20th century, according to the Blaustein Philanthropic Group's website. It seems that Louis, a Lithuanian immigrant, and his son, Jacob, teamed up to deliver kerosene in a horse-drawn wagon through the streets of Baltimore.  In 1910, the pair named their fledgling business the American Oil Company -- Or Amoco.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 4, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The government must pay $16 million for the film that captured President John F. Kennedy's assassination, an arbitration panel has ruled, making the 26 seconds of 8 mm film the most expensive historical artifact in U.S. history.Concluding a dispute that brought comparisons to the $30.8 million paid for a Leonardo da Vinci manuscript and the $3 million spent on Mark McGwire's 70th home run ball, a divided panel gave the heirs of Abraham Zapruder, who died in 1970, a sum that's much less than they sought but far more than the government wanted to pay.The dispute involved the stunning color footage Zapruder filmed near the grassy knoll in Dealey Plaza in Dallas as Kennedy was shot on Nov. 22, 1963.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | February 9, 2014
"I won't have any money to leave behind. I won't have the fine and luxurious things of life to leave behind. But I just want to leave a committed life behind. " --  Martin Luther King Jr., Feb. 4, 1968 Maybe we should take up an offering. Obviously, the heirs of Martin Luther King Jr. are hard up for money. That must be why they keep selling off pieces of his legacy. Have you heard the latest? King's youngest child, Bernice, issued a statement last week after her brothers, Dexter and Martin III, filed suit to force her to turn over their father's Nobel Peace Prize and his traveling Bible.
NEWS
By David Horsey | March 26, 2013
Jay Leno had to know the head honchos at NBC were gunning for him when he told the following joke last Monday night: "You know the whole legend of St. Patrick, right?" he asked the audience in his opening monologue. "St. Patrick drove all the snakes out of Ireland -- and then they came to the United States and became NBC executives. " The harsh humor directed at the guys who hold his fate in their hands is just the latest sign that the star and the bosses pretty much detest each other.
NEWS
March 13, 2013
In a review of the Walters Art Museum show of paintings by 19 t h -century American artist Richard Caton Woodville, reporter Mary McCauley writes that "the real mystery ... is why so little about the painter is known today - even in his hometown" ("Walters explores work of Caton heir who lived fast, died young," March 9). However, the article does little to give readers a greater understanding of the painter or his works. Woodville challenged (and continues to challenge)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2013
The handsome young man sitting in the pink parlor chair radiates restlessness, a disdain for social conventions and undeniable self-satisfaction. The impatience in Richard Caton Woodville's "Self-Portrait with Flowered Wallpaper" can be detected in the wide-thrust knees of the artist born to a wealthy and prominent Baltimore family, and in his hastily buttoned and pointedly shabby jacket. His ego can be gleaned from the care he lavished on painting his face. Woodville imbued his visage with the high, broad forehead and aquiline nose that were thought in that age to signify a lofty mind and an aristocratic, resolute temperament.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec | May 17, 2012
When several teams, including the Oakland Raiders and Chicago Bears, expressed interest in Baltimore director of player personnel Eric DeCosta for their general manager opening earlier this offseason, the Ravens responded by giving their long-time executive a contract extension and a title change. Today, they announced that DeCosta, who started in an entry-level position with the organization in 1996 and is now considered the heir apparent to general manager Ozzie Newsome , has been promoted to assistant general manager.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2012
A disbarred Annapolis lawyer was ordered Thursday to serve 18 months in the Anne Arundel County jail plus five years on probation for siphoning nearly $308,000 from a client. Jerold K. Nussbaum, 60, whom Karen Gunther hired to handle her mother's estate, stole most of it in 2005 and 2006, according to prosecutors and court records. He had pleaded guilty in January. "Mr. Nussbaum not only stole my money, but I've lost my home," Gunther, the heir, told Judge Paul A. Hackner, according to a recording of the court hearing.
BUSINESS
By JANET KIDD STEWART and JANET KIDD STEWART,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | October 30, 2005
When the childless retired couple created a living trust to leave their estate to relatives and friends, they never dreamed one of the heirs would come looking for his money early. But when an adult nephew did that, it raised a host of uncomfortable questions. "Although we would like to help him with some of his financial problems, we were a little taken aback by his request," the Florida couple - who asked not to be named because of the sensitivity involved - wrote in a letter asking for advice on how to respond.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | October 20, 2004
The Rouse Co. and its intended acquirer asked a Delaware court yesterday to make sure the merger doesn't fall apart or drag on until next year because of an objection by heirs of the late billionaire Howard Hughes. Hughes' heirs are owed Rouse stock through 2009 as part of a complicated deal that allowed Rouse to buy Hughes' real estate in Las Vegas and Los Angeles in 1996. Rouse said last night that the heirs are contending that the pending $12.6 billion sale of Rouse to General Growth Properties is a "prohibited transaction" under the Hughes deal and therefore requires their approval.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2012
Johns Hopkins University's motion to dismiss a family's lawsuit over development plans for a Montgomery County farm was denied Friday evening, according to the plaintiffs. The suit claims that Hopkins' plan to construct high-rise buildings on the land violates an agreement the land's previous owner entered into with the university more than twenty years ago, according to a statement from plaintiffs, led by John Timothy Newell. Elizabeth Beall Banks and her siblings transferred the 138-acre Belward Farm to Hopkins with the expectation that development of the land, near Gaithersburg, would be limited to a low-rise campus.
NEWS
By Lori Aratani, The Washington Post | February 1, 2012
Local lore has it that Elizabeth Beall Banks once chased developers off her Gaithersburg-area farm with a shotgun when they came around asking questions. But even then, the sprawl opponent knew that the same forces that turned parcels around her into housing tracts, business parks and shopping centers would eventually threaten the 138-acre Belward Farm. Rather than sell it to the highest bidder, her heirs said, she sold it to the Johns Hopkins University — a suitor she believed would protect the farm from the development she detested.
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