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Heir Apparent

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BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | September 21, 1992
A Praetorian Guard of stuffed bears line the floor of Peter Manos' office in the gleaming new Landover headquarters of Giant Food Inc.The collection of a dozen or so costumed bears started with Humphrey Beargart, a birthday gift from Mr. Manos' employees. The next year, along came Lauren Bearcall and a tradition was born.It's easy to see why stuffed bears seemed like the perfect gift for Mr. Manos, the veteran Giant executive who earlier this month was named president and designated as successor to the company's living-legend chief executive, 79-year-old Israel "Izzy" Cohen.
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SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec | May 17, 2012
When several teams, including the Oakland Raiders and Chicago Bears, expressed interest in Baltimore director of player personnel Eric DeCosta for their general manager opening earlier this offseason, the Ravens responded by giving their long-time executive a contract extension and a title change. Today, they announced that DeCosta, who started in an entry-level position with the organization in 1996 and is now considered the heir apparent to general manager Ozzie Newsome , has been promoted to assistant general manager.
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NEWS
July 20, 1996
PRESIDENT NELSON Mandela is an extraordinary man. He emerged from 26 years of isolation in South African jails without evident bitterness or thirst for revenge. He resumed his anti-apartheid leadership as if he had never been away, providing wisdom and pragmatism as his country began dismantling its white-supremacist political system and institutions. A measure of his achievement is that whereas many whites previously fretted about Mr. Mandela coming to power, they now worry about what will happen after he leaves office.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec | January 5, 2012
The Indianapolis Colts and St. Louis Rams and and one other team have contacted the Ravens and received permission to interview Director of Player Personnel Eric DeCosta for their general manager opening, a league source said. The Chicago Tribune reported Thursday night that the other team is the Chicago Bears. None of the interviews have taken place as of now, but that could change in the next couple of days. The Colts and Rams have already started their interview process and it is believed that DeCosta, the heir apparent to Ravens general manager and executive vice president Ozzie Newsome, is at or near the top of their respective wish lists.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 28, 1997
NEW YORK -- American Express Co. named Kenneth Chenault president and chief operating officer yesterday, making him heir apparent to Chairman Harvey Golub.Chenault, 45, a vice chairman who runs the charge card and international businesses, will oversee day-to-day operations of the New York-based financial services company. The move makes Chenault, one of the highest-ranking black executives in the nation, the likely successor when Golub retires in seven years at age 65."This move clearly recognizes Ken as the No. 2 executive in the company and the primary internal candidate to succeed me when the time comes," Golub said in a statement.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 30, 2005
NEW YORK - Rupert Murdoch's son and heir apparent at News Corp., Lachlan K. Murdoch, abruptly resigned from his executive posts at the media company yesterday and said he was moving back to Australia with his family. His departure raises fresh questions about executive succession at one of the world's most successful and powerful media companies. Though Rupert Murdoch, 74, has refused to publicly pick a successor, it was widely believed that he favored Lachlan, his oldest son, to replace him as chief executive and chairman upon his retirement.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | February 7, 1997
Marriott International Inc. yesterday reported record earnings and named a 22-year company veteran as its president and chief operating officer, a likely heir apparent to succeed Marriott-family control of the world's largest hotel operator.William J. Shaw's elevation to the newly created position as No. 2 executive sets the stage for an eventual transition at the top of Marriott, which has been led by a family member with the last name of Marriott since the company's founding in 1927.In the interim, J. W. Marriott Jr. will continue as chairman and chief executive officer, and he said he has no plans to retire.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | March 15, 1995
Ending months of speculation about Procter & Gamble Co.'s corporate succession, the company's board yesterday named John Pepper, 56, a gentlemanly consensus-builder who is a 32-year veteran of the company, to be chairman and chief executive beginning July 1.He will succeed Edwin Artzt, Procter's autocratic leader for the last five years, whose departure had been expected.The board of the consumer-products giant appeared to be naming not only the heir apparent but also an heir apparent to him: Durk Jager, 51, a highly competitive strategist with an impatient streak, will replace Mr. Pepper as president and assume the newly created position of chief operating officer.
NEWS
By Bob Zelnick | May 28, 1999
WHEN Bill Clinton was contemplating Al Gore as his 1992 running mate, he placed a call to former Tennessee Gov. Ned McWherter, and wondered aloud whether the fact that both he and Mr. Gore hailed from small, adjacent Southern states would prove an electoral disadvantage."
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun Reporter | December 13, 2006
McCormick & Co. Inc. chief executive Robert J. Lawless is relinquishing some of the reins to his heir apparent, Alan D. Wilson, as part of the company's succession plan. The Sparks-based spice maker announced yesterday that Lawless will hand off the title of president to Wilson, 49, who is president of North American Consumer Foods and Supply Chain for McCormick, on Jan. 1. Wilson also will assume the newly revived post of chief operating officer. Lawless will stay on as chief executive officer and chairman until his retirement, which the 60-year-old indicated yesterday was not imminent.
SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON | June 21, 2008
A lot of the Ravens' veterans are a little nervous these days. They have a new coach with a different style, and such distinguished players as quarterback Steve McNair and offensive tackle Jonathan Ogden have recently retired. The Ravens have capable replacements for McNair and some "project" players who might fill in for Ogden. And they just might have a hot-shot rookie kicker, Piotr Czech out of Wagner College, who could push veteran Matt Stover in training camp. Stover is probably not concerned.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | December 2, 2007
With Del. Barry Glassman officially put forth as the choice of county Republican leaders to replace J. Robert Hooper in the state Senate, the focus now turns to the scramble to fill the House seat. On Thursday, the Harford County Republican Central Committee interviewed Glassman, the only candidate who applied. Members voted unanimously to forward his name to Gov. Martin O'Malley, who will make the appointment official. The committee put Glassman through "a rigorous set of questions just as though there were multiple candidates for the job," said Michael A. Geppi Sr., central committee chairman.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun Reporter | December 13, 2006
McCormick & Co. Inc. chief executive Robert J. Lawless is relinquishing some of the reins to his heir apparent, Alan D. Wilson, as part of the company's succession plan. The Sparks-based spice maker announced yesterday that Lawless will hand off the title of president to Wilson, 49, who is president of North American Consumer Foods and Supply Chain for McCormick, on Jan. 1. Wilson also will assume the newly revived post of chief operating officer. Lawless will stay on as chief executive officer and chairman until his retirement, which the 60-year-old indicated yesterday was not imminent.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 30, 2005
NEW YORK - Rupert Murdoch's son and heir apparent at News Corp., Lachlan K. Murdoch, abruptly resigned from his executive posts at the media company yesterday and said he was moving back to Australia with his family. His departure raises fresh questions about executive succession at one of the world's most successful and powerful media companies. Though Rupert Murdoch, 74, has refused to publicly pick a successor, it was widely believed that he favored Lachlan, his oldest son, to replace him as chief executive and chairman upon his retirement.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 14, 2005
Electric as Elektra, Jennifer Garner does a high-powered, blade-thrusting star turn as Marvel Comics' ninja-inspired superheroine, bringing such unbridled energy and sexuality to her performance, one barely notices the movie itself. And that's a good thing, because Elektra is pretty shallow stuff, a pastiche of martial-arts razzmatazz surrounding a too-solemn ode to lost childhood. Both Elektra and her enemies, emissaries of an evil group known as The Hand, seem to acquire new powers at will, and emotions turn way too arbitrarily.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | November 2, 2004
WASHINGTON - Columnists for my newspaper, The New York Times, are not allowed to endorse presidential candidates. But I think this election is so important, I am going to break the rules. I hope I don't get fired. But here goes: I am endorsing George Bush for president. No, no - not George W. Bush. I am endorsing his father - George H. W. Bush. The more I look back on the elder Mr. Bush, the more I find things to admire and the more I see attributes we need in our next president. Let's start with domestic policy.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2000
After 52 years, the National Association for Stock Car Racing has a president whose last name isn't France. Yesterday afternoon, Bill France, the man who followed his father, Bill France Sr., as president of the sport in 1972, announced he is stepping aside immediately and named Mike Helton, NASCAR's vice president and competition director, as his replacement. While stepping aside, France is not retiring. Instead, France, 67, will be chairman of a new five-member sanctioning board that includes his brother, Jim, his children, Brian France and Lesa Kennedy, who are all NASCAR executives, and Helton.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 14, 2005
Electric as Elektra, Jennifer Garner does a high-powered, blade-thrusting star turn as Marvel Comics' ninja-inspired superheroine, bringing such unbridled energy and sexuality to her performance, one barely notices the movie itself. And that's a good thing, because Elektra is pretty shallow stuff, a pastiche of martial-arts razzmatazz surrounding a too-solemn ode to lost childhood. Both Elektra and her enemies, emissaries of an evil group known as The Hand, seem to acquire new powers at will, and emotions turn way too arbitrarily.
BUSINESS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 17, 2003
The Greater Baltimore Alliance yesterday said yesterday that it had named a 31-year-old entrepreneur and consultant as the No. 2 executive at the economic development organization, positioning him for the top job when the group's leader leaves in six months. Christian S. Johansson will assume the role of executive vice president July 7 and become a potential successor to President and Chief Executive Ioanna T. Morfessis, who will step down Dec. 31 to start her own business. The regional business group, whose mission is to lure and retain businesses, still intends to conduct a national search for a replacement for Morfessis, said John A. MacColl, GBA board chairman and vice chairman of insurer St. Paul Cos. Inc. But he and Morfessis, who announced her resignation in April, left little doubt that Johansson had made a strong impression on GBA leadership.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2003
Spherix Inc., best known for its decades-long attempt to develop a low-calorie sugar substitute, reported yesterday that it lost $2.9 million last year and said its president and chief operating officer had resigned. David Affeldt, who had been with the company since 1998 and president and COO since January 2001, had been expected to take over as chief executive officer upon the resignation of Gilbert Levin, Spherix's 78-year-old founder. Levin said in February 2002 that he was thinking of stepping aside so he could concentrate solely on the company's biotechnology division.
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