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NEWS
August 4, 2004
On Tuesday, August 3, 2004, IRENE SHARGEL HEIFETZ, of Baltimore, devoted mother of Jerry (Jackie), Martin (Carolyn) and Leon (Janet). Beloved sister of Dorothy and Ruth. Cherished grandmother of Risa, Paula, Julie, Eric, Deborah and Jeffrey. Beloved great-grandmother of Zachary, Hannah, David, Leah, Giovanni and Olivia Graveside Services will be held on Thursday, August 5 at 11 A.M. at Hebrew Young Mens Association, 58 Windsor Mill Rd., Baltimore. Family will be observing Shiva at the residence of Dr. Martin Shargel Thursday and Saturday evening at 7:30 P.M. Contributions may be made to The Music Fund at Temple Shalom, 8401 Grubb Rd., Chevy Chase, MD 20815.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
On Monday morning, friends of Dmitry Volkov, the talented cellist who died unexpectedly in Baltimore on May 10 at the age of 26, gathered at the Peabody Institute, where he recently earned an artist's diploma. Among those deeply affected by the loss of this promising musician is Daniel Heifetz, president and founder of Heifetz International Music Institute in Staunton, Va., where Mr. Volkov was artist in residence. On Wednesday, Mr. Heifetz will accompany the body of the cellist back to his parents in Russia.
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NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 15, 1998
THE PERFORMING Arts Association of Linthicum presents Daniel Heifetz and the Classical Band at 3 p.m. Sunday at North County High School, 10 E. First St., Ferndale.They will perform Vivaldi's "The Four Seasons" and selections by Bach and Vitali.Heifetz, who has performed as a soloist with the world's leading orchestras, is the founder and artistic director of the Heifetz International Music Institute and is on the faculties of the University of Maryland, College Park and Carnegie Mellon University.
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown and For The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2012
Wedding Day: Aug. 11, 2012 Her story: Alexandra Heifetz-Jones, 29, grew up in Dayton. She lives in Davis, Calif., and is in her second year at the University of California-Davis School of Law. Her mother, Suzanne Heifetz, is a clinical social worker in geriatric psychiatry at the University of Maryland Medical Center. Her father, Daniel Heifetz, is a mathematician on the research staff for the Institute for Defense Analyses. His story: Kyle Jones, 27, grew up in Richmond, Va. He lives in Davis, Calif., and works at the Apple store in Sacramento; he's also a freelance photographer/videographer.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | October 4, 1990
There is a myth of "absolute music" that was fostered in the Victorian era, a time when poetry aspired to the seemingly abstract and "meaningless" status of music.In fact, music has often been tied to the pictorial and programmatic. Even so supposed an absolute musician as Beethoven conceived programs for his music -- most famously for the "Pastoral Symphony," but perhaps for such other works as the Fourth Piano Concerto -- and composers such as Tchaikovsky and Schumann were always trying to foist programs for their music off on anyone willing to listen.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 22, 1999
In the first of three valedictory concerts of their 1999 season, the faculty members of Daniel Heifetz's International Music Institute performed a diverse musical program at the Banneker-Douglass Museum in Annapolis on Friday evening.Billed as "Sounds of the Spirits," the selections flirted with the theme of spirituality in music, but wound up being more of a pleasant hodgepodge of pieces these three violinists, two pianists, violist and cellist like to play.The thread connecting "Kol Nidrei," Max Bruch's take on Judaism's Yom Kippur liturgy, Tartini's fire-breathing "Devil's Trill" Sonata, the pristine opening Largo from J. S. Bach's 4th Violin Sonata, and the brief middle movement of Beethoven's sublime G Major Piano Concerto (heard in an arrangement for string quintet and keyboard)
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 15, 1999
Concert events by the Heifetz Institute, Annapolis' own international music festival, reach a crescendo over the next three weekends.Tomorrow night at the Banneker-Douglass Museum, 84 Franklin St. in Annapolis, institute founder Daniel Heifetz, the Classical Band, and associated string players will present "Music of the Spirits," a program of works by Bach, Beethoven, Tartini, Bruch, Wieniawski, Chausson and Vitali.On July 23, also at Banneker-Douglass, soprano Carmen Balthrop joins Heifetz and the Classical Band for a program titled "Love and Passion."
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 25, 2002
Based at St. John's College for the previous four summers, Daniel Heifetz and his International Music Institute brought excitement and charisma - along with classical music - to downtown Annapolis. Having outgrown the available space at St. John's, Heifetz moved the Music Institute this summer to the more spacious quarters of Brewster Academy in Wolfeboro, N.H. But Heifetz' many local fans will be pleased to hear that the violinist will return to Annapolis with his Classical Band and his daughter soprano Elena Heifetz to present one concert, on Aug. 25. The concert, titled "Voice of a People: The Jewish Soul," will be presented at 3 p.m. at Kneseth Israel Synagogue at Spa Road and Hilltop Lane in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 23, 1998
I attended a lovely tea Saturday afternoon at Manresa on the Severn, courtesy of the Heifetz International Music Institute.Daniel Heifetz, a concert violinist and professor of music at the University of Maryland, has attracted an international roster of 38 young string players to Annapolis this summer to undergo a "total performer training" program designed to help turn talented youngsters into full-blown artists.The teas at 3 p.m. Saturdays represent only part of the informal concertizing done by Heifetz participants over the course of their first summer in the state capital.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 18, 1998
When Heifetz comes to town, string players flock to him.In this case, the Heifetz isn't the legendary Jascha, but his distant cousin Daniel.Daniel Heifetz, a gifted violinist who has performed with many leading orchestras, has set up his Heifetz International Music Institute in Annapolis, with an office in Maryland Hall and a full program of events at St. John's College.The Heifetz Institute brings together talented young string players from around the world for an intensive summer of concerts, studio lessons and master classes taught not only by musicians but by authorities in dance, opera, theater and public speaking.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 18, 2006
NEW YORK -- Milton Kaye, 97, a pianist and arranger who moved with ease from accompanying Heifetz to writing theme music for the TV quiz show Concentration, from playing in Toscanini's orchestra to playing the organ on The Rootie Kazootie Show, died Monday in New York. "Because so much of what he did was ephemeral, it survives - if it survives - totally by accident," said Dennis D. Rooney, a music writer and critic who presented a paper on Mr. Kaye at a meeting of the Association for Recorded Sound Collections in May. Among his accomplishments was introducing Shostakovich's Piano Concerto No. 1 to the United States in 1935, Mr. Rooney said.
NEWS
August 4, 2004
On Tuesday, August 3, 2004, IRENE SHARGEL HEIFETZ, of Baltimore, devoted mother of Jerry (Jackie), Martin (Carolyn) and Leon (Janet). Beloved sister of Dorothy and Ruth. Cherished grandmother of Risa, Paula, Julie, Eric, Deborah and Jeffrey. Beloved great-grandmother of Zachary, Hannah, David, Leah, Giovanni and Olivia Graveside Services will be held on Thursday, August 5 at 11 A.M. at Hebrew Young Mens Association, 58 Windsor Mill Rd., Baltimore. Family will be observing Shiva at the residence of Dr. Martin Shargel Thursday and Saturday evening at 7:30 P.M. Contributions may be made to The Music Fund at Temple Shalom, 8401 Grubb Rd., Chevy Chase, MD 20815.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 25, 2002
Based at St. John's College for the previous four summers, Daniel Heifetz and his International Music Institute brought excitement and charisma - along with classical music - to downtown Annapolis. Having outgrown the available space at St. John's, Heifetz moved the Music Institute this summer to the more spacious quarters of Brewster Academy in Wolfeboro, N.H. But Heifetz' many local fans will be pleased to hear that the violinist will return to Annapolis with his Classical Band and his daughter soprano Elena Heifetz to present one concert, on Aug. 25. The concert, titled "Voice of a People: The Jewish Soul," will be presented at 3 p.m. at Kneseth Israel Synagogue on Spa Road and Hilltop Lane in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 25, 2002
Based at St. John's College for the previous four summers, Daniel Heifetz and his International Music Institute brought excitement and charisma - along with classical music - to downtown Annapolis. Having outgrown the available space at St. John's, Heifetz moved the Music Institute this summer to the more spacious quarters of Brewster Academy in Wolfeboro, N.H. But Heifetz' many local fans will be pleased to hear that the violinist will return to Annapolis with his Classical Band and his daughter soprano Elena Heifetz to present one concert, on Aug. 25. The concert, titled "Voice of a People: The Jewish Soul," will be presented at 3 p.m. at Kneseth Israel Synagogue at Spa Road and Hilltop Lane in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 2, 2001
Ruth Laredo, one of this country's most distinguished and versatile pianists, will be in Annapolis this weekend to take part in the final concerts of this year's Heifetz Institute summer music festival. At 7:30 p.m. Friday, Laredo will take center stage at St. John's College's Great Hall for a recital of solo works by Rachmaninoff and Scriabin, after which she'll accompany Daniel Heifetz, the institute's founding father, in the brooding, passionate A minor Violin Sonata of Cesar Franck.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | July 22, 2001
"I want to help young artists become the music, not just play the music." With that basic philosophy, violinist Daniel Heifetz explains the impetus behind his Heifetz International Music Institute, held each summer in Annapolis. On the surface, the six-week institute, which runs through Aug. 4, may look like just another music camp, a place for students from around the world to hone their skills and do a little performing in between regular school years. Look again. During a recent week, about half of the institute's 50-plus students, ages 12 to early 20s, are standing in a circle in the ceremonial room of a courthouse used for several institute classes.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 25, 2002
Based at St. John's College for the previous four summers, Daniel Heifetz and his International Music Institute brought excitement and charisma - along with classical music - to downtown Annapolis. Having outgrown the available space at St. John's, Heifetz moved the Music Institute this summer to the more spacious quarters of Brewster Academy in Wolfeboro, N.H. But Heifetz' many local fans will be pleased to hear that the violinist will return to Annapolis with his Classical Band and his daughter soprano Elena Heifetz to present one concert, on Aug. 25. The concert, titled "Voice of a People: The Jewish Soul," will be presented at 3 p.m. at Kneseth Israel Synagogue on Spa Road and Hilltop Lane in Annapolis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | July 22, 2001
"I want to help young artists become the music, not just play the music." With that basic philosophy, violinist Daniel Heifetz explains the impetus behind his Heifetz International Music Institute, held each summer in Annapolis. On the surface, the six-week institute, which runs through Aug. 4, may look like just another music camp, a place for students from around the world to hone their skills and do a little performing in between regular school years. Look again. During a recent week, about half of the institute's 50-plus students, ages 12 to early 20s, are standing in a circle in the ceremonial room of a courthouse used for several institute classes.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 12, 2001
Mozart's music has the power to turn even the deepest and most gifted among us into wide-eyed children. "I am in love with Mozart like a young girl," wrote the Danish philosopher Soren Kierkegaard. "Mozart," said the great 19th-century composer Antonin Dvorak, "is sunshine." We'll all have the chance to sit in awe of Salzburg's eternal wunderkind Friday evening when faculty members of the Heifetz International Institute, Annapolis' own summer music festival, present an all-Mozart concert in St. John's College's Great Hall.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 21, 2001
St. John's College's Great Hall will be echoing with the sounds of great music in the coming weeks when the faculty and guest artists of the Heifetz Institute turn Annapolis into a summer music festival. Daniel Heifetz, professor of violin at the University of Maryland, College Park, has brought together an impressive roster of teachers and distinguished visitors for the Annapolis-based summer institute program, which offers six weekends of concert fare with emphasis on some of the greatest chamber music ever composed.
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