Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHege
IN THE NEWS

Hege

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 19, 2001
Had anti-depressants been invented in Robert Schumann's day, he probably would have lived a longer and happier life. But would he have composed so much deeply soulful music? Could a thoroughly angst-free personality have ever unleashed such poignancy as the Adagio of his Symphony No. 2, with its aching, arching theme that stretches the heart-strings ever tighter with each return? That score, which the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra played so nobly last night under resident conductor Daniel Hege's direction, was written as Schumann came out of a severe mental breakdown.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By PHIL GREENFIELD and PHIL GREENFIELD,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 31, 2006
By the late 1800s, French composers were in the throes of a love affair with Spain, an infatuation that would continue well into the 20th century. It was Georges Bizet, a Frenchman after all, whose opera Carmen became the classic tale of passion and betrayal under the hot Andalusian sun. Debussy's Iberia, Chabrier's Espana and several works by Ravel (including the famous Bolero) further attest to the French fascination with life on the other side of the Pyrenees. So did Edouard Lalo's Symphonie Espagnole, which isn't a symphony at all, but a five-movement violin concerto chock-full of references to the rhythms, dances and exotic effects that characterize the music and movement emanating from sunny Spain.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | May 23, 2002
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra enjoyed a five-year association with Daniel Hege, who held the positions of assistant, associate and resident conductor successively through 2001. Hege, who is now in his third season as music director of the Syracuse Symphony Orchestra, returns to the BSO as guest conductor this week to lead a program of chestnuts - two much-loved German works, plus one of the most popular American pieces. The American item is Barber's Adagio for Strings, which packs a remarkable amount of poignancy into a rather short span of time.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 31, 2003
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia - The International Winter Festival Arts Square may not have the most graceful name in English, but what it means in Russian is location, location, location. When Yuri Temirkanov first envisioned the festival, which opened its fifth anniversary season this week, he saw as its focal point the area of this city known as Arts Square. Within easy reach of each other are located the Shostakovich Philharmonia, home of Temirkanov's St. Petersburg Philharmonic and scene of innumerable historic premieres in symphonic music; the State Russian Museum, with its 400,000-item collection spanning 1,000 years of the country's artistic history; and the Mussorgsky Opera and Ballet Theater, overshadowed by the more famous Mariinsky Theater in another part of town, but still very much in the cultural picture.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 26, 2001
Anton Bruckner's time, unlike Gustav Mahler's, may never come. Many who have long been keen on Mahler's extremes of emotion and sonority, his embrace of the sublime and the vulgar, still have trouble adjusting to Bruckner's sound world. Such folks, taking comfort in Brahms' pungent dismissal of Bruckner's works as "symphonic boa constrictors," are missing an awful lot. Bruckner's Ninth Symphony, which the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra played with impressive security and tonal beauty Thursday evening at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, is a case in point.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 9, 1997
Someone's good luck usually has nothing to do with his being lucky. It's more often the case that a state of readiness enables one to take advantage of situations that, without preparation, might otherwise prove disastrous.Last week, Swiss conductor Mario Venzago was forced to cancel his appearances this week with the Baltimore Symphony. Last night, in Meyerhoff Hall, the orchestra's assistant conductor, Daniel Hege, stepped into the breach to lead Venzago's program of Ravel's "Rhapsodie Espagnole," Rachmaninov's Second Piano Concerto (with soloist Yuliya Gorenman)
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 22, 1999
Daniel Hege believes in being prepared, keeps a cool head and has a knack for surmounting obstacles.The evening before the final day of the Baltimore Symphony's tour of Japan 18 months ago, music director David Zinman was stricken by a kidney stone and had to be flown home. But what prevented Zinman from conducting the final concert of the tour in Tokyo's Suntory Hall turned into a triumph for Hege, the orchestra's then 32-year-old assistant conductor.Without so much as a chance to rehearse the program, Hege went on to lead a brilliant concert.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 18, 2003
Terminated last fall in a highly controversial fashion by the Annapolis Symphony's board after an artistically successful five-year tenure with the ASO, conductor Leslie B. Dunner has relocated to Chicago. Taking center stage this weekend in works by Mozart, Beethoven and Brahms will be the orchestra he left behind, an ASO set to begin the two-year process that will culminate in the naming of Dunner's successor in 2005. The plan is for each finalist in the Conductor's Derby to lead a concert in the 2004-2005 subscription season.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 13, 1999
Evidence that good things sometimes happen to good people will arrive this evening when the Syracuse (N.Y.) Symphony names Daniel Hege as its sixth music director, effective at the beginning of next season.The 33-year-old Hege, the Baltimore Symphony's associate music director, has been on the BSO's conducting staff since the beginning of the 1996-1997 season.He has won the respect, admiration and affection of the orchestra's musicians for his intelligence, talent, musical integrity and personal decency -- a combination of qualities generally considered rare in any human being, rarer still in a conductor.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | February 5, 2000
Walking into the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall Thursday night, it was tempting to feel a bit sorry for Daniel Hege. Not only did the Baltimore Symphony's resident conductor have the unenviable task of following two weeks of Temirkanov-mania, but he was charged with leading a program built on Berg's Violin Concerto -- not one of the more audience-enticing works in the orchestral repertoire. Walking out of the Meyerhoff at the end of the concert, I instead felt sorry for any who might have been scared off by the bill.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 18, 2003
Terminated last fall in a highly controversial fashion by the Annapolis Symphony's board after an artistically successful five-year tenure with the ASO, conductor Leslie B. Dunner has relocated to Chicago. Taking center stage this weekend in works by Mozart, Beethoven and Brahms will be the orchestra he left behind, an ASO set to begin the two-year process that will culminate in the naming of Dunner's successor in 2005. The plan is for each finalist in the Conductor's Derby to lead a concert in the 2004-2005 subscription season.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | May 23, 2002
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra enjoyed a five-year association with Daniel Hege, who held the positions of assistant, associate and resident conductor successively through 2001. Hege, who is now in his third season as music director of the Syracuse Symphony Orchestra, returns to the BSO as guest conductor this week to lead a program of chestnuts - two much-loved German works, plus one of the most popular American pieces. The American item is Barber's Adagio for Strings, which packs a remarkable amount of poignancy into a rather short span of time.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 26, 2001
Anton Bruckner's time, unlike Gustav Mahler's, may never come. Many who have long been keen on Mahler's extremes of emotion and sonority, his embrace of the sublime and the vulgar, still have trouble adjusting to Bruckner's sound world. Such folks, taking comfort in Brahms' pungent dismissal of Bruckner's works as "symphonic boa constrictors," are missing an awful lot. Bruckner's Ninth Symphony, which the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra played with impressive security and tonal beauty Thursday evening at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, is a case in point.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 19, 2001
Had anti-depressants been invented in Robert Schumann's day, he probably would have lived a longer and happier life. But would he have composed so much deeply soulful music? Could a thoroughly angst-free personality have ever unleashed such poignancy as the Adagio of his Symphony No. 2, with its aching, arching theme that stretches the heart-strings ever tighter with each return? That score, which the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra played so nobly last night under resident conductor Daniel Hege's direction, was written as Schumann came out of a severe mental breakdown.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 23, 2000
The centennial of Aaron Copland's birth and the 10th anniversary of his death, both milestones being noted this year, have prompted renewed appreciation for the man and his music. Not that he needs it. Long before he died, Copland was widely acknowledged as a great - perhaps the greatest - American composer. Despite sniping from those who find his works simplistic or disingenuous, Copland's position remains rock-solid. The reasons why could be plainly heard in the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's admirable performance of his Symphony No. 3 Friday evening led by resident conductor Daniel Hege.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 22, 2000
This review appeared in some editions on Saturday. The latest Baltimore Symphony Orchestra program celebrates pianos, pianists and composers who were great pianists. For good measure, it throws in a whimsical poet and a veteran of stage and screen who knows how to milk a good verse. It's quite an evening, without a dull minute in it. On Friday at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, the electricity gained in intensity as the number of keyboards in use declined -- Mozart's Concerto for Three Pianos, Saint-Saens' "Carnival of the Animals" for two pianos and orchestra, Rachmaninoff's powerhouse D minor Piano Concerto.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 17, 1998
Under guest conductor Daniel Hege Wednesday evening at Goucher College, the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra gave the finest performance I've heard from that ensemble in almost 12 years.Hege's reading of Tchaikovsky's Serenade for Strings was direct, spontaneous and passionate. The "Waltz" movement had gentle lilt, the "Elegie" had delicacy as well as fervor, and the rhythms in the concluding "Danse Russe" were bracing and strong.The playing of the orchestra's strings was -- judged even by the highest standard -- superbly polished.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 24, 1999
Yesterday evening's Baltimore Symphony program, which was conducted by Daniel Hege, was primarily designed to provide opportunities for members of the orchestra to shine as soloists.In Vivaldi's Flute Concerto in D Major (Opus 10, No. 3), principal flutist Emily Skala produced a beautifully refined and cool pianissimo tone whenever such was called for and provided evidence of her virtuosity in the fast movements. Skala is more than a very good musician, however. In her dignified way -- she has unimpeachable musical taste -- she's a genuine charmer.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 20, 2000
The latest Baltimore Symphony Orchestra program celebrates pianos, pianists and composers who were great pianists. For good measure, it throws in a whimsical poet and a veteran of stage and screen who knows how to milk a good verse. It's quite an evening, without a dull minute in it. Last night at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, the electricity gained in intensity as the number of keyboards in use declined -- Mozart's Concerto for Three Pianos, to Saint-Saens' "Carnival of the Animals" for two pianos and orchestra, to Rachmaninoff's powerhouse D minor Piano Concerto.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | February 5, 2000
Walking into the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall Thursday night, it was tempting to feel a bit sorry for Daniel Hege. Not only did the Baltimore Symphony's resident conductor have the unenviable task of following two weeks of Temirkanov-mania, but he was charged with leading a program built on Berg's Violin Concerto -- not one of the more audience-enticing works in the orchestral repertoire. Walking out of the Meyerhoff at the end of the concert, I instead felt sorry for any who might have been scared off by the bill.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.