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By Theo Lippman Jr. and Theo Lippman Jr.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 4, 2001
The Department of Defense has appealed for ideas to help in the fight against terrorism. Officials said they want innovative ideas from sources that might otherwise not have access to the Pentagon - small companies and individuals with imaginative solutions. This idea of the national equivalent to the office suggestion box drew jibes from some quarters. A Washington columnist for the New York Times laughed at the idea of "every Tom, Dick and Goofball" becoming national security consultants.
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By Theo Lippman Jr. and Theo Lippman Jr.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 4, 2001
The Department of Defense has appealed for ideas to help in the fight against terrorism. Officials said they want innovative ideas from sources that might otherwise not have access to the Pentagon - small companies and individuals with imaginative solutions. This idea of the national equivalent to the office suggestion box drew jibes from some quarters. A Washington columnist for the New York Times laughed at the idea of "every Tom, Dick and Goofball" becoming national security consultants.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | August 10, 1992
"Ecstasy" is the film that liberated us all or the film that sent us on the road to hell, depending on your attitude toward erotic matters. It was so hot that the master of hot, Henry Miller, even wrote an essay on it!A 1932 cause celebre, it made an international star out of its star, Hedy Keisler, once Hollywood changed her name to Hedy Lamarr. The sequence in question found Ms. Keisler-Lamarr, in the buff, doing the dog paddle in a Czechoslovakian pond. Certain parts of her never before seen on screen were enough to guarantee a career and a legend.
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By Los Angeles Times | September 25, 1992
The telephone. The light bulb. The automobile.Quick. Name the inventors. Of course you can.How about flat-bottomed paper bags, bullet-proof vests and Scotchgard? The dishwasher, the fire escape, AZT?Of course you can't.Why? Because these inventors are women, says historian Anne L. Macdonald. That's why they're hard to find in history books.Or in any books."For a long time, it was thought women were only creative biologically," says Ms. Macdonald. "While we know that's not true, there is no question that when it comes to inventions, women have been horribly ignored."
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | August 11, 1992
"Ecstasy" is the film that liberated us all or the film that sent us on the road to hell, depending on your attitude toward erotic matters. It was so hot that the master of hot, Henry Miller, even wrote an essay on it!A 1932 cause celebre, it made an international star out of its star, Hedy Keisler, once Hollywood changed her name to Hedy Lamarr. The sequence in question found Ms. Keisler-Lamarr, in the buff, doing the dog paddle in a Czechoslovakian pond. Certain parts of her never before seen on screen were enough to guarantee a career and a legend.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | September 25, 1992
The telephone. The light bulb. The automobile.Quick. Name the inventors. Of course you can.How about flat-bottomed paper bags, bullet-proof vests and Scotchgard? The dishwasher, the fire escape, AZT?Of course you can't.Why? Because these inventors are women, says historian Anne L. Macdonald. That's why they're hard to find in history books.Or in any books."For a long time, it was thought women were only creative biologically," says Ms. Macdonald. "While we know that's not true, there is no question that when it comes to inventions, women have been horribly ignored."
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By Fred Rasmussen | August 25, 1991
From The Sun Aug. 25-31, 1841Aug. 26: Catharine McKean and Mary Ann King, two degraded white women, were imprisoned, with great propriety too, on the night of the 26th inst., for using profane and obscene language in the streets.Aug. 31: Yesterday about noon, a little son of Mrs. Green, who lives in Armistead Lane, Federal Hill, was unfortunately drowned at the wharf near Watchman & Bratt's establishment.From The Sun Aug. 25-31, 1891Aug. 25: James Phipps, Jr., son of James Phipps, who keeps a shoe store at Towson, while painting today in the Sheppard Asylum, was taken with a fainting spell said to have been caused by the smell of "hard oil."
NEWS
November 30, 1995
Israel Goldiamond, 76, an experimental psychologist who found novel ways to investigate animal and human behavior patterns and used this knowledge to help patients overcome unwanted habits, died of bone marrow cancer Nov. 19 in Chicago. He had retired from the University of Chicago in 1990 as professor emeritus of psychiatry and psychology. His forte was the analysis of behavior under controlled laboratoryconditions. His research generated methods of altering harmful or problematic behavior, including overeating, smoking and phobias.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON'S | January 16, 2009
Big-game sportsmen talk about a trophy hunt. Big-time AFC teams talk about the Hunt trophy. Lamar Hunt. Sounds like the product of a marriage between movie star Hedy Lamarr and Watergate burglar E. Howard Hunt. But in reality, new Ravens fan, the Lamar Hunt Trophy is what your team is playing for Sunday. Hunt was a sports giant who founded the American Football League, the upstart organization that forced a merger with the NFL in 1970. The 10 AFL teams (along with the NFL Baltimore Colts, Pittsburgh Steelers and Cleveland Browns)
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 31, 1996
On ABC tonight, it's the return of the return of John, Paul, George and Ringo."Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Dr. Quinn's about to have her baby, so of course Mom and Sis arrive to help. Meanwhile, the Army gets orders to move the Indians to another reservation and Sully (Joe Lando) is injured trying to help his friend Cloud Dancing (Larry Sellers). CBS."Ushuaia: The Ultimate Adventure" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- French adventurer Nicholas Hulot performs all sorts of derring-do, including: swimming with a 45-foot whale shark in Australia, hang-gliding in the Alps and walking atop a Manhattan construction site.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | August 11, 1992
"Ecstasy" is the film that liberated us all or the film that sent us on the road to hell, depending on your attitude toward erotic matters. It was so hot that the master of hot, Henry Miller, even wrote an essay on it!A 1932 cause celebre, it made an international star out of its star, Hedy Keisler, once Hollywood changed her name to Hedy Lamarr. The sequence in question found Ms. Keisler-Lamarr, in the buff, doing the dog paddle in a Czechoslovakian pond. Certain parts of her never before seen on screen were enough to guarantee a career and a legend.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | August 10, 1992
"Ecstasy" is the film that liberated us all or the film that sent us on the road to hell, depending on your attitude toward erotic matters. It was so hot that the master of hot, Henry Miller, even wrote an essay on it!A 1932 cause celebre, it made an international star out of its star, Hedy Keisler, once Hollywood changed her name to Hedy Lamarr. The sequence in question found Ms. Keisler-Lamarr, in the buff, doing the dog paddle in a Czechoslovakian pond. Certain parts of her never before seen on screen were enough to guarantee a career and a legend.
NEWS
August 26, 1995
Jay Garon, a New York literary agent who transformed his career and the world of publishing with a single call to a Mississippi lawyer in 1987, died Tuesday of a pulmonary embolism at St. Clare's Hospital in New York. He was 71.A one-time Hollywood character actor from Fall River, Mass., who opened his literary agency in the 1950s, Mr. Garon had his share of successes, among them a diet book by the actor James Coco, reminiscences by Hedy Lamarr and a stream of romance novels.But nothing had prepared him -- or anyone else -- for what happened in 1987 when he received three unsolicited chapters of a first novel by an obscure Mississippi lawyer.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | May 2, 1991
IT'S GOOD to see Wil Love back at Center Stage.An excellent comedian, Love plays about half the roles in ''The Mystery of Irma Vep,''absolutely the campiest thing the company has ever done.The play was written by Charles Ludlam, a practitioner of camp who died at age 44 in 1987. His ''Irma Vep'' was first produced off Broadway in 1984 and won two Obies. In the Center Stage production, multiple roles are shared by Love and Derek D. Smith, who manages to keep comic pace with Love.The staging is very much a part of the comedy, which takes place in the new Head Theater.
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