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Hedda Gabler

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NEWS
By Arthur Laupus and Arthur Laupus,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 1, 2001
Theda Bara, the legendary actress of the silent screen, was the original Vamp, but she pales in contrast to Hedda Gabler, the selfish, immoral and conniving vixen created by Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen some 20 years before Theda started leading men to their cinematic doom. Ibsen's play Hedda Gabler, at the Kittamaqundi Theatre in Oliver's Carriage House in Columbia through Saturday, is the tale of a bored middle-class housewife married to an aspiring pillar of the community, scholar George Tesman.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2006
EXHIBIT WALTERS' PRECIOUS BOOKS It's an odd name for an unusual exhibit. Schatzkammer: Henry Walters' German Manuscripts, an exhibit of 24 medieval German manuscripts, is on display Saturday through Oct. 29 at the Walters Art Museum. Henry Walters amassed the collection of high-quality, rare and illustrated ninth-through-16th-century Gospel books, prayer books, liturgical manuscripts and theological texts throughout his lifetime. During the Middle Ages, precious books and possessions such as these were stored in the Schatzkammer, or treasury, of a church or palace for protection.
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NEWS
By Staff report | April 17, 1991
Plays are the thing this weekend in the county.Take your choice between comedy and drama. You'll have a chance to grab dinner with some of the performances, too."Hedda Gabler," Ibsen's story of a tragic heroine, opens at Western Maryland College for three performances this weekend.Curtain rises at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 7 p.m. Sunday at Alumni Hall, Westminster.Tickets are $4 for adults and $2 for students and senior citizens. Information: 857-2448.*Want a little lighter fare? Try St. Benjamin's Youth Group's presentation of "Two for the Money," a one-act comedy and stay for dinner.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | August 25, 2005
Wanna put on a show, but having trouble finding props and costumes? Theatre Hopkins could have the answer to your problems. Forced to vacate its longtime home in the Merrick Barn at the Johns Hopkins University to make room for the university's undergraduate theater courses, Theatre Hopkins is holding a sale of costumes, props and memorabilia from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday in the Mattin Center's F. Ross Jones Building on the Homewood campus, 3400 N....
ENTERTAINMENT
By Makeba Scott Hunter and Makeba Scott Hunter,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2003
The Everyman Theatre is bringing an updated version of the classic Henrik Ibsen play Hedda Gabler to Baltimore next week. Written in 1890, Ibsen questioned the role of women in Victorian society through his protagonist Hedda, an affluent woman trapped in a marriage to a struggling scholar. The adaptation, written by acclaimed up-and-comer Jon Robin Baitz, stays true to Ibsen's work but cuts down on much of the original text and replaces it with a more modern vocabulary. "This is a new approach for Hedda -- it's sexy and dangerous and fun," said Deborah Hazlett, a member of the resident acting company at Everyman who plays Hedda.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2006
EXHIBIT WALTERS' PRECIOUS BOOKS It's an odd name for an unusual exhibit. Schatzkammer: Henry Walters' German Manuscripts, an exhibit of 24 medieval German manuscripts, is on display Saturday through Oct. 29 at the Walters Art Museum. Henry Walters amassed the collection of high-quality, rare and illustrated ninth-through-16th-century Gospel books, prayer books, liturgical manuscripts and theological texts throughout his lifetime. During the Middle Ages, precious books and possessions such as these were stored in the Schatzkammer, or treasury, of a church or palace for protection.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 22, 2003
Everyman Theatre's 2003-2004 season will emphasize new American voices - along with the theater's first modern European classic, Ibsen's Hedda Gabler. "I really want the fresh voices of the American theater that are high quality to be present in our season at Everyman, and I think when you combine skilled masters like Ibsen with fresh new voices that construct well-written plays, you have the stuff that makes great theater," artistic director Vincent M. Lancisi says of the season, which includes a Baltimore premiere and a recent Pulitzer Prize winner.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Alexandra Fenwick and Alexandra Fenwick,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2004
Growing up, Tana Hicken always wanted to be an actress, but no one knew it until she won a part in her high school musical, cast appropriately as a character named Ingenue. That first role launched an unstoppable career, and today there is no doubt that acting is her passion. Just look at her 35 years in regional theater, her latest appearance coming in Picnic, the Pulitzer Prize-winning play opening tomorrow at Center Stage. Hicken has appeared in five shows at Center Stage between 1977 and 1985, and this performance marks her return to the Baltimore playhouse after almost two decades.
NEWS
By DAVID SHRIBMAN | January 16, 1994
The world isn't such a bad place after all. Right now I am reading ''The Picture of Dorian Gray,'' Oscar Wilde's classic novel about conscience, character and the nature of art. (It is also about a guy who stays young even as his portrait ages). But the important thing is that this book, the only novel Wilde ever wrote, is at your bookstore this very instant for the total cost of one dollar.This is a development with almost revolutionary implications. Just as the penny newspaper and the dime-store novel transformed America, so could a new series of paperbacks called the Dover Thrift Editions.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | August 25, 2005
Wanna put on a show, but having trouble finding props and costumes? Theatre Hopkins could have the answer to your problems. Forced to vacate its longtime home in the Merrick Barn at the Johns Hopkins University to make room for the university's undergraduate theater courses, Theatre Hopkins is holding a sale of costumes, props and memorabilia from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday in the Mattin Center's F. Ross Jones Building on the Homewood campus, 3400 N....
ENTERTAINMENT
By Alexandra Fenwick and Alexandra Fenwick,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2004
Growing up, Tana Hicken always wanted to be an actress, but no one knew it until she won a part in her high school musical, cast appropriately as a character named Ingenue. That first role launched an unstoppable career, and today there is no doubt that acting is her passion. Just look at her 35 years in regional theater, her latest appearance coming in Picnic, the Pulitzer Prize-winning play opening tomorrow at Center Stage. Hicken has appeared in five shows at Center Stage between 1977 and 1985, and this performance marks her return to the Baltimore playhouse after almost two decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Makeba Scott Hunter and Makeba Scott Hunter,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2003
The Everyman Theatre is bringing an updated version of the classic Henrik Ibsen play Hedda Gabler to Baltimore next week. Written in 1890, Ibsen questioned the role of women in Victorian society through his protagonist Hedda, an affluent woman trapped in a marriage to a struggling scholar. The adaptation, written by acclaimed up-and-comer Jon Robin Baitz, stays true to Ibsen's work but cuts down on much of the original text and replaces it with a more modern vocabulary. "This is a new approach for Hedda -- it's sexy and dangerous and fun," said Deborah Hazlett, a member of the resident acting company at Everyman who plays Hedda.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 22, 2003
Everyman Theatre's 2003-2004 season will emphasize new American voices - along with the theater's first modern European classic, Ibsen's Hedda Gabler. "I really want the fresh voices of the American theater that are high quality to be present in our season at Everyman, and I think when you combine skilled masters like Ibsen with fresh new voices that construct well-written plays, you have the stuff that makes great theater," artistic director Vincent M. Lancisi says of the season, which includes a Baltimore premiere and a recent Pulitzer Prize winner.
NEWS
By Arthur Laupus and Arthur Laupus,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 1, 2001
Theda Bara, the legendary actress of the silent screen, was the original Vamp, but she pales in contrast to Hedda Gabler, the selfish, immoral and conniving vixen created by Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen some 20 years before Theda started leading men to their cinematic doom. Ibsen's play Hedda Gabler, at the Kittamaqundi Theatre in Oliver's Carriage House in Columbia through Saturday, is the tale of a bored middle-class housewife married to an aspiring pillar of the community, scholar George Tesman.
NEWS
By DAVID SHRIBMAN | January 16, 1994
The world isn't such a bad place after all. Right now I am reading ''The Picture of Dorian Gray,'' Oscar Wilde's classic novel about conscience, character and the nature of art. (It is also about a guy who stays young even as his portrait ages). But the important thing is that this book, the only novel Wilde ever wrote, is at your bookstore this very instant for the total cost of one dollar.This is a development with almost revolutionary implications. Just as the penny newspaper and the dime-store novel transformed America, so could a new series of paperbacks called the Dover Thrift Editions.
NEWS
By Staff report | April 17, 1991
Plays are the thing this weekend in the county.Take your choice between comedy and drama. You'll have a chance to grab dinner with some of the performances, too."Hedda Gabler," Ibsen's story of a tragic heroine, opens at Western Maryland College for three performances this weekend.Curtain rises at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 7 p.m. Sunday at Alumni Hall, Westminster.Tickets are $4 for adults and $2 for students and senior citizens. Information: 857-2448.*Want a little lighter fare? Try St. Benjamin's Youth Group's presentation of "Two for the Money," a one-act comedy and stay for dinner.
NEWS
September 15, 2002
Michael Bookspan, 73, a longtime percussionist for the Philadelphia Orchestra who was famed for his cymbal playing, died Thursday in Philadelphia of complications from heart surgery. A member of the orchestra since 1953, Mr. Bookspan, as principal percussionist, was known as a dynamic presence in the back of the ensemble. During his tenure, he played under three conductors and was widely recognized as an expert percussionist, especially with the cymbals. Rolf Fjelde, 76, a teacher and writer who translated the works of Henrik Ibsen into English, died Tuesday in White Plains, N.Y. Mr. Fjelde was best known for his translations of works by the Norwegian playwright, which are frequently performed.
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