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By Frederick Rasmussen and Frederick Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2001
Louis L. Kaplan - heralded as "the father of creative Jewish learning in Baltimore" and nearly synonymous with Baltimore Hebrew University - died in his sleep yesterday at North Oaks retirement community in Owings Mills. He was 98. A major player in the local Jewish community for nearly 70 years, Dr. Kaplan was a highly respected educator who served Baltimore Hebrew for four decades and also chaired the University of Maryland Board of Regents during the 1970s. He wrote widely on Judaism and helped establish Beth Am Synagogue on Eutaw Place in West Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,arthur.hirsch@baltsun.com | June 20, 2009
The movers are taking Baltimore Hebrew University apart, clearing faculty offices, piling high the boxes and unplugged computers, rolling up the lobby's Oriental carpet and marking leather chairs with stickers identifying their next stop: "TU." That's Towson University, now officially the new home of BHU's graduate courses and community programs. The Maryland Board of Regents voted unanimously Friday to approve the new partnership, closing one chapter in the life of the 90-year-old institution of Jewish learning and opening another.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 1, 2002
JERUSALEM - A bomb exploded yesterday in a crowded cafeteria on the main campus of Hebrew University, killing seven people, including three Americans, and injuring more than 80 others, many of them foreign exchange students who had just registered for summer classes. The Islamic militant group Hamas claimed responsibility for the attack and said it was a retaliation for Israel's assassination eight days earlier of one of its leaders in an airstrike in Gaza. "It's a part of a series of responses that will take a long time and teach all Israelis," the group said in a statement faxed to a news agency.
NEWS
January 16, 2009
Over its 90-year history, the Baltimore Hebrew University has educated thousands of professionals to serve in Jewish schools, service groups and charitable organizations. And its distinguished scholars, such as Harry Orlinsky, a leading biblical translator and authenticator of the Dead Sea Scrolls, have made important contributions to the world's store of knowledge. But in recent years, BHU has struggled with declining enrollments and an uncertain future. Last year, it registered only 118 students, most of whom were enrolled in its graduate program.
NEWS
July 7, 1997
Chone Shmeruk, 76, widely considered the most prominent contemporary researcher of Yiddish, died Saturday in his native Warsaw of unspecified causes, according to Hebrew University in Jerusalem.Mr. Shmeruk, a professor emeritus of Yiddish literature and former chair of the Yiddish Department at Hebrew University, also wrote extensively on the history of east European Jewry.He won the Israel Prize, the country's highest honor, last year.He fled Poland for the Soviet Union during World War II. Returning to Warsaw after the war, he discovered that his entire family there had been killed.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 3, 2002
NABLUS, West Bank - Penning the old city of Nablus with scores of tanks, bulldozers and armored vehicles, Israel sent soldiers house to house yesterday in pursuit of explosives laboratories and suspected extremists, acting against what it called a possible source of the bomb that killed seven people, including five Americans, at Hebrew University on Wednesday. Elsewhere, Israel stepped up its punishment of the relatives of suicide attackers, destroying the homes of at least two families and preparing to banish the brothers of two assailants to the Gaza Strip.
NEWS
By Warren Bass | August 18, 2002
THE FRANK Sinatra Cafeteria is - was - a pleasantly utilitarian place, with drab, workaday decor, unwieldy triangular trays and a reliably cheerful old gent who'd slap burekas, rice and schnitzel onto the plates of students with a democratic enthusiasm that cared not a whit whether they were Jewish or Arab. During my own college days, on a junior year abroad spent at the Hebrew University's majestic perch, looking down on the deceptively still city of Jerusalem, my friends and I ate there so often that we coined our own Hebrew verb for eating at Frank's.
NEWS
November 5, 1992
2 programs offer wisdom to those teaching children about heritageSearching and troubling questions for Jewish and Christian adults attempting to instruct children about their religious heritage will be explored in free, public programs this month at two Baltimore-area synagogues.A discussion of the impact of the Holocaust on Christian and Jewish understandings of forgiveness will be led Nov. 18 at Pikesville's Chizuk Amuno Congregation, 8100 Stevenson Road, by two California scholars. They are Rabbi Harold M. Schulweis of Encino, who has a national reputation as an author and preacher, and John K. Roth, professor of philosophy at Claremont McKenna College in Claremont, who has written extensively about the Holocaust.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Chris Kaltenbach and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2000
Just last year, 14-year-old Jamie Bell had never been to America, much less shuttled between New York, Los Angeles and Chicago, hobnobbing with Rosie O'Donnell and Sarah Jessica Parker. What a difference having Oscar buzz about your movie can make. Jamie shines in the new British movie "Billy Elliot," in which he plays an 11-year-old boy from a testosterone-filled English coal-mining town who wants to be a ballet dancer. Critics around the world have raved about his performance, and many have even tossed about "Oscar" in the same sentence as "Billy Elliot."
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 2, 2002
JERUSALEM - They came to Israel from the United States to study, to teach or to explore their faith, on a university campus that seemed immune from the violence taking place outside its gates. Hebrew University's campus on Mount Scopus, the Americans could assure nervous parents and friends, was a haven of diversity, a place for debate, not bombs. That changed Wednesday, when a nail-studded explosive hidden in a bag blew up in the campus cafeteria, killing seven people, including five Americans.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,stephen.kiehl@baltsun.com | January 8, 2009
Baltimore Hebrew University, grappling with a long-term decline in enrollment, is in negotiations to become a part of Towson University, officials said. The state Board of Regents has informally indicated its approval of the talks. The plans are not complete, but the heads of both institutions said they believe negotiations will succeed. As part of Towson, Baltimore Hebrew would maintain its identity, said Jonathan Lowenberg, chairman of the board of the 90-year-old college. "Baltimore Hebrew University, as with any number of small universities around the country, faces financial issues and the ability to grow our programs as we think is appropriate," he said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 26, 2008
YITZHAR, West Bank - A pipe bomb that exploded late last night outside the Jerusalem home of Zeev Sternhell, a Hebrew University professor, left him slightly wounded and created only a minor stir in a nation that routinely experiences violence on a much larger scale. But Sternhell was noted for his impassioned criticism of Jewish settlements in the West Bank, once suggesting that Palestinians "would be wise to concentrate their struggle against the settlements." And the authorities found fliers near his home offering nearly $300,000 to anyone who kills a member of Peace Now, a left-wing Israeli advocacy group, leading them to suspect that militant Israeli settlers or their supporters were behind the attack.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun reporter | August 19, 2007
Rabbi Leivy Smolar, former president of Baltimore Hebrew University and founder of the school's Master of Arts and doctoral degree programs, died Monday of cancer at his home in Richmond, Va. He was 69. "He was really the critical player in professionalizing the staff of the Jewish communal agencies in Baltimore. If one looks around, they are staffed with graduates of Baltimore Hebrew University," said Robert O. Freedman, a past president of the school. Dr. Smolar was born in Ra'anana, Israel.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Gadi Dechter and Liz F. Kay and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporters | June 5, 2007
Baltimore Hebrew University announced yesterday its president will step down after a major donor decided to cut nearly in half its financial support over the next five years. Rela Mintz Geffen, a sociologist, had led the predominantly graduate institution for seven years. Geffen's planned departure comes just weeks after The Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore stated it will cut its annual contribution to the university from $1.1 million to $600,000 over the next five years.
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,Los Angeles Times | May 11, 2007
JERUSALEM -- For more than three decades, Israeli archaeologist Ehud Netzer scraped at the ancient man-made hillock. He searched the top. He dug at the bottom. Finally Netzer carved into the midsection and there, he claims, found his prize: the grave of Herod the Great. The evidence, in the form of shards of decorative stonework that may have been a coffin and pieces of a structure thought to have been the mausoleum, is still far from ironclad proof. Archaeologists have not found a body.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2005
Anne R. Jacobson, a retired teacher and librarian who devoted her life to charitable endeavors, died of kidney failure Thursday at her Northwest Baltimore home. She was 96. Miss Jacobson was born and raised in East Baltimore, the daughter of immigrants from Russia. Her father was a shochet -- who slaughters animals according to strict Jewish kosher rules -- and her mother a homemaker. Miss Jacobson graduated from Eastern High School in 1927 and earned a teaching certificate in 1929 from what is now Towson University.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 8, 1997
JERUSALEM -- A yearlong celebration of Jerusalem's founding by King David 3,000 years ago ended this past weekend with Israeli Mayor Ehud Olmert reiterating that Jerusalem will forever remain "one united city under the sole sovereignty of Israel."That's the abiding, hard line on the toughest issue facing Israelis and Palestinians in the peace process.But a new survey conducted under the auspices of the University of Maryland's Center for International and Security Studies suggests that a sizable percentage of Israeli Jews are willing to cede outlying Arab areas of the city to the Palestinians.
NEWS
By Patrick Ercolano and Patrick Ercolano,Evening Sun Staff | October 23, 1991
The Rev. Rose Vernell, the first ordained female priest in the African-American Catholic Congregation, will celebrate a mass at a.m. Sunday at the AACC's local Imani Temple at 1111 E. Cold Spring Lane.The AACC is the breakaway black Catholic congregation founded by Bishop George Stallings, a former Roman Catholic priest in the Archdiocese of Washington.Vernell, 50, was once a nun in the Roman Catholic order of the Oblate Sisters of Providence. She left the Oblate Sisters in 1968 and worked until recently as a teacher and an administrator at a St. Paul, Minn.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2004
Samuel Iwry, one of the world's leading Hebrew scholars and an authority on the Dead Sea Scrolls, died of a stroke Saturday at Sinai Hospital. The Mount Washington resident was 93. Dr. Iwry was born and raised in Bialystok, Poland. He was a direct descendant of Rebbe Israel Baal Shem Tov, who lived from 1700 to 1760 and was founder of Judaism's Hasidic Movement. He graduated from Warsaw University, the Higher Institute for Judaic Studies and the Teachers College of Wilno, Poland. After the Nazi invasion in 1939, he wandered from Warsaw to Moscow to Tokyo, and finally to Shanghai.
NEWS
By Warren Bass | August 18, 2002
THE FRANK Sinatra Cafeteria is - was - a pleasantly utilitarian place, with drab, workaday decor, unwieldy triangular trays and a reliably cheerful old gent who'd slap burekas, rice and schnitzel onto the plates of students with a democratic enthusiasm that cared not a whit whether they were Jewish or Arab. During my own college days, on a junior year abroad spent at the Hebrew University's majestic perch, looking down on the deceptively still city of Jerusalem, my friends and I ate there so often that we coined our own Hebrew verb for eating at Frank's.
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