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NEWS
March 7, 2006
Rabbi Jerome Yaakov Markowitz, whose career as a Hebrew school teacher spanned more than four decades, died of heart failure Feb. 28 at his Northwest Baltimore home. He was 77. Rabbi Markowitz was born in Syracuse, N.Y., and moved to Baltimore with his family in 1935. He attended City College and the Talmudical Academy of Baltimore. In 1950, he earned a bachelor's degree in accounting from the University of Baltimore, and was ordained as a rabbi after graduating from Ner Israel Rabbinical College.
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NEWS
September 7, 2007
Leo Reich, a retired Jewish educator and longtime Northwest Baltimore resident, died Monday of a bowel obstruction at Sinai Hospital. He was 82. Mr. Reich was born and raised in Brooklyn, N.Y., where he graduated from Thomas Jefferson High School. He attended Mesivita Yeshiva Rabbi Chaim Berlin in Brooklyn before enlisting in the Army in 1943. He was a private with an Army engineering unit in France during World War II. After the war, he returned to Mesivita Yeshiva Rabbi Chaim Berlin.
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NEWS
September 7, 2007
Leo Reich, a retired Jewish educator and longtime Northwest Baltimore resident, died Monday of a bowel obstruction at Sinai Hospital. He was 82. Mr. Reich was born and raised in Brooklyn, N.Y., where he graduated from Thomas Jefferson High School. He attended Mesivita Yeshiva Rabbi Chaim Berlin in Brooklyn before enlisting in the Army in 1943. He was a private with an Army engineering unit in France during World War II. After the war, he returned to Mesivita Yeshiva Rabbi Chaim Berlin.
NEWS
March 7, 2006
Rabbi Jerome Yaakov Markowitz, whose career as a Hebrew school teacher spanned more than four decades, died of heart failure Feb. 28 at his Northwest Baltimore home. He was 77. Rabbi Markowitz was born in Syracuse, N.Y., and moved to Baltimore with his family in 1935. He attended City College and the Talmudical Academy of Baltimore. In 1950, he earned a bachelor's degree in accounting from the University of Baltimore, and was ordained as a rabbi after graduating from Ner Israel Rabbinical College.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | May 9, 1993
Susan Chase baked coconut bread and brewed Costa Rican coffee yesterday, hoping fair-goers would sample South American and Caribbean culture at the New Windsor Service Center's annual International Festival."
NEWS
By Diane Reynolds and Diane Reynolds,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 18, 2000
Judaism comes alive at Beth Shalom Congregation Religious School. For Eve Klein and others of her generation, Hebrew school was a duty rather than a pleasure. "Growing up, nobody wanted to go," says Klein. For her children, it's a different story. As students at Beth Shalom Congregation Religious School, her sons Matthew and Benjamin look forward to attending classes, even after a long day at public school. "I used to hear that kids don't like to come to Hebrew school after a full day of school," agrees Richard Kavalsky, director of Beth Shalom school, "so we try to bring Judaism to life here.
NEWS
By Jeff Seidel and Jeff Seidel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 16, 2004
Simply put, Beth Shalom Synagogue in Columbia needs room. The Conservative Jewish congregation is so crowded that it holds Saturday services in an auditorium that quickly gets turned into an area for Hebrew school classes - and then must be changed back again for the next set of religious services. Children in the Hebrew school are tutored on sofas in the halls. But this is something that Beth Shalom's leaders expected when opening 10 years ago. It was thought that an expansion would be necessary about this point, and they have started fund-raising for a $3.5 million project that will double the building's size and provide some badly needed relief.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | March 28, 2002
IN MY YOUTH, my parents shipped me off to Hebrew school three times a week. They wanted me to discover faith and tradition, and some notion of God. In my restlessness, I would gaze outside the windows of the Liberty Jewish Center and discover what looked like Greater America. Out there, I saw gentile friends playing the great American game of football. In Mr. Aaron's Hebrew school classroom, we wore yarmulkes on our heads; out there in Greater America, they wore football helmets. In class, we each wore a gentle tallit around our shoulders; out there, they wore rugged shoulder pads.
NEWS
By Diane Reynolds and Diane Reynolds,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 2, 2000
The book of Exodus says that seven weeks after Passover, God delivered the first five books of the Bible, the Torah, to Moses, who gave them to the Israelites. From Thursday through June 10, Columbia Jewish Congregation, with Jews around the world, will celebrate this event during the multifaceted holiday of Shavuot. "Shavuot absorbs three streams of meaning: the giving of the Torah, the first fruits of the harvest and, in the non-Orthodox tradition, graduation from Hebrew school and post-Hebrew school studies," says Rabbi George Driesenof the Columbia Jewish Congregation.
NEWS
By CHRIS YAKAITIS and CHRIS YAKAITIS,SUN REPORTER | September 25, 2005
On Dec. 19, 1906, the state of Maryland approved a charter that marked the founding of Kenesseth Yishroal, the "Assembly of Israel." It was the first synagogue in Annapolis, with about 150 members who met above a store on Market Space. Ninety-nine years and several locations later, Congregation Kneseth Israel, which bills itself as Southern Maryland's oldest Jewish congregation, is beginning a 100th anniversary celebration of its history, presence and service within the local community.
NEWS
By CHRIS YAKAITIS and CHRIS YAKAITIS,SUN REPORTER | September 25, 2005
On Dec. 19, 1906, the state of Maryland approved a charter that marked the founding of Kenesseth Yishroal, the "Assembly of Israel." It was the first synagogue in Annapolis, with about 150 members who met above a store on Market Space. Ninety-nine years and several locations later, Congregation Kneseth Israel, which bills itself as Southern Maryland's oldest Jewish congregation, is beginning a 100th anniversary celebration of its history, presence and service within the local community.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Staff | June 19, 2005
The Wonder Spot By Melissa Bank. Viking. 324 pages. $24.95. You are going to like Sophie Applebaum. In fact, she's going to be your new best friend this summer. You're going to drop Bridget Jones so fast, she'll bounce. Sophie is the heroine of Melissa Bank's long-awaited second novel, The Wonder Spot. The author of The Girls' Guide to Hunting and Fishing has created for us a sharp-eyed, sharp-tongued young woman who stumbles out of the Philadelphia suburbs and her tight-knit, uptight Jewish family and into New York City, where she keeps stumbling, mostly through relationships.
NEWS
By Jeff Seidel and Jeff Seidel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 16, 2004
Simply put, Beth Shalom Synagogue in Columbia needs room. The Conservative Jewish congregation is so crowded that it holds Saturday services in an auditorium that quickly gets turned into an area for Hebrew school classes - and then must be changed back again for the next set of religious services. Children in the Hebrew school are tutored on sofas in the halls. But this is something that Beth Shalom's leaders expected when opening 10 years ago. It was thought that an expansion would be necessary about this point, and they have started fund-raising for a $3.5 million project that will double the building's size and provide some badly needed relief.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | March 28, 2002
IN MY YOUTH, my parents shipped me off to Hebrew school three times a week. They wanted me to discover faith and tradition, and some notion of God. In my restlessness, I would gaze outside the windows of the Liberty Jewish Center and discover what looked like Greater America. Out there, I saw gentile friends playing the great American game of football. In Mr. Aaron's Hebrew school classroom, we wore yarmulkes on our heads; out there in Greater America, they wore football helmets. In class, we each wore a gentle tallit around our shoulders; out there, they wore rugged shoulder pads.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2001
WALDORF -- To find the congregation's Torah, you must enter an Episcopal church and ascend to a musty attic that is home to mice and cardboard boxes. It seems an odd place for the elegant, handwritten scroll containing Judaism's teachings, but its owners assure that it won't be there much longer. After a decade of renting space from the church and other organizations for services and storage, the fledgling Congregation Sha'are Shalom recently bought a 4-acre property here on which it will build Charles County's first synagogue.
NEWS
By Diane Reynolds and Diane Reynolds,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 18, 2000
Judaism comes alive at Beth Shalom Congregation Religious School. For Eve Klein and others of her generation, Hebrew school was a duty rather than a pleasure. "Growing up, nobody wanted to go," says Klein. For her children, it's a different story. As students at Beth Shalom Congregation Religious School, her sons Matthew and Benjamin look forward to attending classes, even after a long day at public school. "I used to hear that kids don't like to come to Hebrew school after a full day of school," agrees Richard Kavalsky, director of Beth Shalom school, "so we try to bring Judaism to life here.
NEWS
By NATALIE HARVEY | August 22, 1995
Howard County public schools begin their 1995-1996 academic year next week, but there is still time for summer fun.Tomorrow, children 5 to 10 years old are invited to create bookmarks for their reading materials at Borders Books and Music Store in Snowden Square, Snowden River Road. The staff will supply free materials and advice. The class is limited to the first 20 children who call 290-0062.*On Saturday, Alberta Gary United Methodist Church is sponsoring a Last Days of Summer backyard carnival from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. for all ages.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Staff | June 19, 2005
The Wonder Spot By Melissa Bank. Viking. 324 pages. $24.95. You are going to like Sophie Applebaum. In fact, she's going to be your new best friend this summer. You're going to drop Bridget Jones so fast, she'll bounce. Sophie is the heroine of Melissa Bank's long-awaited second novel, The Wonder Spot. The author of The Girls' Guide to Hunting and Fishing has created for us a sharp-eyed, sharp-tongued young woman who stumbles out of the Philadelphia suburbs and her tight-knit, uptight Jewish family and into New York City, where she keeps stumbling, mostly through relationships.
NEWS
By Diane Reynolds and Diane Reynolds,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 2, 2000
The book of Exodus says that seven weeks after Passover, God delivered the first five books of the Bible, the Torah, to Moses, who gave them to the Israelites. From Thursday through June 10, Columbia Jewish Congregation, with Jews around the world, will celebrate this event during the multifaceted holiday of Shavuot. "Shavuot absorbs three streams of meaning: the giving of the Torah, the first fruits of the harvest and, in the non-Orthodox tradition, graduation from Hebrew school and post-Hebrew school studies," says Rabbi George Driesenof the Columbia Jewish Congregation.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner | January 25, 1999
FOR A boy growing up in New York in the 1960s, several players on the Mets were worthy of adoration: Tom Seaver, the pitcher destined for baseball's Hall of Fame; the fleet-footed outfielder Tommie Agee or even Ron Swoboda, a Dundalk native who stole the hearts of Orioles' fans with his diving catch in the 1969 World Series.A Jewish youth then, however, also had to reserve a corner of his heart for Art Shamsky, a fringe player and a rare Jew in the major leagues. Hebrew school lessons about the importance of religious custom were driven home by the fact that Mr. Shamsky wouldn't play on the Jewish High Holy Days.
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