Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHebrew Language
IN THE NEWS

Hebrew Language

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Michael J. Clark and Michael J. Clark,Howard County Bureau of The Sun | June 18, 1991
After 6 1/2 hours of instruction, the Hebrew class was over, and the teacher threw up his arms. "I taught you how to read," he exulted. "I am finished."Rabbi Noah Golinkin had wrapped up another marathon session of teaching adults the ancient Jewish language.The Columbia rabbi is the Johnny Appleseed of Hebrew, a man on a mission to teach the 4,000-year-old language to American Jews.He estimates that a nationwide Hebrew literacy campaign he helped launch in 1978, along with a teaching method he has developed over the past 28 years, has given 80,000 American Jews reading knowledge of the language.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 14, 2003
I followed your instructions on how to use the Character Map in Windows - clicking on Start, then Programs, to Accessories to System Tools - just to see where that leads. Once there I found a program for all kind of fonts, including Hebrew. When I get messages in Hebrew, the screen shows only the computer squiggles. Is there anything to be done to receive something legible? I have Windows XP. That Character Map is where you find exotic symbols like the copyright mark, umlauts, degree symbols and such, but it's not what you need to read those Hebrew language Web pages.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1997
When brothers Nickolai and Michael Atamas came to this country from Ukraine, all they knew about being Jewish was to keep it quiet.Judaism -- and all religion -- was something to hide in the former Soviet Union, officially atheist. "They taught you in school that there is no God," said Nickolai, 14.The brothers remember only remnants of what was once a flourishing Jewish culture in Ukraine. In Simferopol, the Crimean city where they lived until 1994, "the synagogue was about the size of a chicken coop," said 10-year-old Michael.
NEWS
April 26, 1998
"Impelled by this historic and traditional attachment, Jews strove in every successive generation to re-establish themselves their ancient homeland. In recent decades they returned in their masses. Pioneers, immigrants and defenders, they made deserts bloom, revived the Hebrew language, built villages and towns, and created a thriving community controlling its own economy and culture, loving peace but knowing how to defend itself, bringing the blessings of progress to all the country's inhabitants, and aspiring towards independent nationhood."
NEWS
April 26, 1998
"Impelled by this historic and traditional attachment, Jews strove in every successive generation to re-establish themselves their ancient homeland. In recent decades they returned in their masses. Pioneers, immigrants and defenders, they made deserts bloom, revived the Hebrew language, built villages and towns, and created a thriving community controlling its own economy and culture, loving peace but knowing how to defend itself, bringing the blessings of progress to all the country's inhabitants, and aspiring towards independent nationhood."
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 14, 2003
I followed your instructions on how to use the Character Map in Windows - clicking on Start, then Programs, to Accessories to System Tools - just to see where that leads. Once there I found a program for all kind of fonts, including Hebrew. When I get messages in Hebrew, the screen shows only the computer squiggles. Is there anything to be done to receive something legible? I have Windows XP. That Character Map is where you find exotic symbols like the copyright mark, umlauts, degree symbols and such, but it's not what you need to read those Hebrew language Web pages.
NEWS
By Michael J. Clark and Michael J. Clark,Howard County Bureau of The Sun | June 18, 1991
After 6 1/2 hours of instruction, the Hebrew class was over, and the teacher threw up his arms. "I taught you how to read," he exulted. "I am finished."Rabbi Noah Golinkin had wrapped up another marathon session of teaching adults the ancient Jewish language.The Columbia rabbi is the Johnny Appleseed of Hebrew, a man on a mission to teach the 4,000-year-old language to American Jews.He estimates that a nationwide Hebrew literacy campaign he helped launch in 1978, along with a teaching method he has developed over the past 28 years, has given 80,000 American Jews reading knowledge of the language.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Danna Bethlehem | February 22, 1994
JERUSALEM -- To save a syllable, songwriter Ariel Zilber could lose his listeners.Mr. Zilber, a popular Israeli singer and composer, needed to shorten a line of one of his latest tunes, so he pronounced the Hebrew word four in the feminine form -- "arba," instead of its masculine, "arba'a."The result was a snappier -- but grammatically incorrect -- lyric.Not allowed, said the Israel Broadcasting Authority. The authority has given him until March 13 to get his syntax straight. After that, the monopoly Israel Radio has been told not to broadcast any newly recorded songs that contain grammatically incorrect Hebrew.
NEWS
By Stephen Vicchio | November 6, 1992
The melancholy days are come, the saddest of the year,/ Of wailing winds, and naked woods, and meadows brown and sere.@4 -- William Cullen Bryant, "The Death of Flowers" I TEACH ancient philosophy in the fall. When I arrive with my students at the work of Heraclitus, the leaves are giving themselves up, and one can feel an unsuspected sharpness in the air, the first breaths of cold sweeping down from the north. Just about this time, I look out at the oaks that frame my classroom window, and I tell my students that among the ancient Greeks, Heraclitus was known as "the weeping philosopher."
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN FOREIGN STAFF Contributors to this section; Sun research librarians Paul McCardell, Jean Packard and Andrea Wilson, and news intern Brenda Santamaria, contributed to these articles | April 26, 1998
JERUSALEM - It was a dead language, an 8,000-word relic. And as 19th-century Jewish pilgrims began settling the hills and valleys of what would become Israel, the status of Hebrew seemed like that of the crumbling Roman aqueducts strung across the landscape - interesting to study but unfit for restoration.Theodor Herzl, the father of Zionism, felt that way, wanting no part of a language that you couldn't even use to buy a train ticket. Use German or English, he said, or both.That left it up to lingual zealot Eliezer Perlmann, who arrived in Jerusalem from Lithuania in 1882, changed his name to Ben Yehuda and took up the cause of Hebrew.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1997
When brothers Nickolai and Michael Atamas came to this country from Ukraine, all they knew about being Jewish was to keep it quiet.Judaism -- and all religion -- was something to hide in the former Soviet Union, officially atheist. "They taught you in school that there is no God," said Nickolai, 14.The brothers remember only remnants of what was once a flourishing Jewish culture in Ukraine. In Simferopol, the Crimean city where they lived until 1994, "the synagogue was about the size of a chicken coop," said 10-year-old Michael.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Danna Bethlehem | February 22, 1994
JERUSALEM -- To save a syllable, songwriter Ariel Zilber could lose his listeners.Mr. Zilber, a popular Israeli singer and composer, needed to shorten a line of one of his latest tunes, so he pronounced the Hebrew word four in the feminine form -- "arba," instead of its masculine, "arba'a."The result was a snappier -- but grammatically incorrect -- lyric.Not allowed, said the Israel Broadcasting Authority. The authority has given him until March 13 to get his syntax straight. After that, the monopoly Israel Radio has been told not to broadcast any newly recorded songs that contain grammatically incorrect Hebrew.
NEWS
By Stephen Vicchio | November 6, 1992
The melancholy days are come, the saddest of the year,/ Of wailing winds, and naked woods, and meadows brown and sere.@4 -- William Cullen Bryant, "The Death of Flowers" I TEACH ancient philosophy in the fall. When I arrive with my students at the work of Heraclitus, the leaves are giving themselves up, and one can feel an unsuspected sharpness in the air, the first breaths of cold sweeping down from the north. Just about this time, I look out at the oaks that frame my classroom window, and I tell my students that among the ancient Greeks, Heraclitus was known as "the weeping philosopher."
NEWS
By Michael J. Clark and Michael J. Clark,Howard County Bureau of The Sun | June 18, 1991
After 6 1/2 hours of instruction, the Hebrew class was over, and the teacher threw up his arms. "I taught you how to read," he exulted. "I am finished."Rabbi Noah Golinkin had wrapped up another marathon session of teaching adults the ancient Jewish language.The Columbia rabbi is the Johnny Appleseed of Hebrew, a man on a mission to teach the 4,000-year-old language to American Jews.He estimates that a nationwide Hebrew literacy campaign he helped launch in 1978, along with a teaching method he has developed over the past 28 years, has given 80,000 American Jews reading knowledge of the language.
NEWS
By Michael J. Clark and Michael J. Clark,Howard County Bureau of The Sun | June 18, 1991
After 6 1/2 hours of instruction, the Hebrew class was over, and the teacher threw up his arms. "I taught you how to read," he exulted. "I am finished."Rabbi Noah Golinkin had wrapped up another marathon session of teaching adults the ancient Jewish language.The Columbia rabbi is the Johnny Appleseed of Hebrew, a man on a mission to teach the 4,000-year-old language to American Jews.He estimates that a nationwide Hebrew literacy campaign he helped launch in 1978, along with a teaching method he has developed over the past 28 years, has given 80,000 American Jews reading knowledge of the language.
NEWS
December 13, 1996
Severn student to spend junior year in IsraelMelanie Reininger, a junior at William Smith College, will spend the 1996-1997 school year at Ben Gurion University in Israel.Reininger is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Reid Reininger of Severn.The Smith College program is based at Ben-Gurion University of Negev. Students are taught environmental studies, Hebrew language and literature, history, Judaic studies, philosophy, science, religion, and sociology/anthropology.Police logCrofton: Someone broke into a home in the 1600 block of New Windsor Court between 9 a.m. and 11: 30 a.m. Tuesday and stole two wallets, jewelry and guns, together valued at more than $1,500.
NEWS
July 27, 2001
Columbia church to hold outdoor concert Aug. 4 Columbia Church of Religious Science will present singer Chuck Pyle in an outdoor concert from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Aug. 4 at Chapel View Farm, 2640 Jennings Chapel Road, Woodbine. Tickets are $12; $30 a family. To purchase tickets, send a self-addressed stamped envelope to CCRS, P.O. Box 291, Columbia 21045. Information: 410-750-8559, or send e-mail to CRS@aol.com or www.ccrscolumbia.org. Jewish community school is accepting registration The Columbia Jewish Community School is accepting registration for the 2001-2002 school year.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.