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By LEM SATTERFIELD and LEM SATTERFIELD,SUN REPORTER | August 10, 2006
When heavyweight Oleg Maskaev met trainer Victor Valle Jr. nearly 3 1/2 years ago at Gleason's Gym in Brooklyn, N.Y., Maskaev was shadow-boxing and - it appeared - a shadow of the fighter he once was. "I was alone, just going through the motions," Maskaev said, recalling an 18-month period when, at the age of 33, he had gone 2-3 and was knocked out three times. WBC heavyweight title fight Hasim Rahman (41-5-2, 33 KOs) vs. Oleg Maskaev (32-5, 25 KOs), Saturday, approx. 11 p.m., Las Vegas
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By Aaron Oster | June 10, 2014
As mentioned in yesterday's column , Daniel Bryan's rehab wasn't going as well as hoped.  On Monday's RAW, that was made official when the Authority vacated the title and announced it would be put on the line in a seven-man ladder match. They announced the first two participants of the match quickly, saying Alberto Del Rio earned his shot last week, and also put Randy Orton into the match.  Later in the night, Sheamus and Cesaro also earned their shots in qualifying matches.  You can read about my early thoughts on who should win the match in yesterday's column, but there are two questions that remain after RAW. The first is who will the three remaining competitors be?
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SPORTS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Staff Writer | February 12, 1992
Heavyweight champion of the world.Those words have a certain resonance that eludes even the most sought-after sports crowns. Olympic gold medalist. Super Bowl champ. World Series winner. They just don't strike the same chord as heavyweight champion of the world."The heavyweight champion is considered the strongest man in the world," said Bert Sugar, a boxing historian. "He always has, going back 100 years to John L. Sullivan. He's alone, not one of a team. And he stands almost naked in the ring, in the spotlight.
SPORTS
By Aaron Oster and The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
The question of what to do with the world heavyweight title has been hanging over the WWE since Daniel Bryan announced two weeks ago that he needed surgery. While it seemed like there might be a resolution on Raw, the decision on the belt was postponed, and the lack of a title feud had a ripple effect over the entire show. The previous week, Stephanie McMahon said that Bryan needed to surrender the title on Raw this week. And yes, he did show up. He said that his injury was worse than expected (which I believe is a work, and was just used to get a reaction from the crowd)
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | April 8, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Two years ago, Buster Douglas lay in a Columbus, Ohio, hospital, a 385-pound blob in a diabetes-induced coma.Now, trimmed down to 265 and with new resolve, Douglas has dedicated himself to avenging the loss of his undisputed heavyweight title to Evander Holyfield in October 1990.He will end his self-imposed, six-year exile from the ring June 22, at the Taj Mahal in Atlantic City, N.J., against journeyman Tony La Rosa on the undercard of the Hector Camacho-Roberto Duran middleweight title match.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2002
Standing on a podium and speaking into a microphone at the Mandalay Bay Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas, Baltimore boxer Hasim Rahman filled the room with his bravado. "I'm not looking for a decision. I'm looking to knock Lennox Lewis out again," Baltimore's first world heavyweight champion said on Nov. 15. But two days later, it was Rahman who went down. A right hand from Lewis swiveled Rahman's head, sending him to a fourth-round knockout loss and enabling Lewis to reclaim the heavyweight title he'd lost to Rahman in April 2001.
SPORTS
By LEM SATTERFIELD and LEM SATTERFIELD,SUN REPORTER | August 12, 2006
LAS VEGAS -- Weighing in at a ripped 235 pounds Thursday, Hasim Rahman was told he looked like a bodybuilder heading into tonight's heavyweight title bout against Oleg Maskaev. "No, what I look like is what a heavyweight champ should look like," said Rahman, the Baltimore native who holds the World Boxing Council crown. "A bodybuilder is going to wish he could do what I'm going to do on Saturday night." Rahman needs a solid performance to maintain his hopes of a showdown with International Boxing Federation champ Wladimir Klitschko, if not to silence critics of what has been an up-and-down career.
SPORTS
August 10, 2006
Will you be watching Hasim Rahman defend his heavyweight title? I'll be watching and rooting for Rahman because: he's a Baltimore guy, he hasn't been involved in doping and he's not afraid to talk to people about his loss to Maskaev. Baltimore sports fans need Rahman, and he needs us. David Boyd White Hall NEXT QUESTION Would Maurice Clarett have stayed out of trouble if he had finished out his career at Ohio State? Selected responses to today's question will be printed tomorrow on The Kickoff page.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | October 30, 1997
LAS VEGAS -- Evander Holyfield is looking to draw as big a crowd to share his faith as he can to watch him fight.Two days before he fights Michael Moorer to unify portions of the heavyweight title, Holyfield will act as host for an event he thinks is bigger than his fight.The WBA heavyweight champion is organizing a Christian rally for Nov. 6 that organizers predict will draw 15,000 people for a night of preaching and music.If it does, it will rival the crowd expected for the fight two nights later at the UNLV campus arena that will unify the WBA and IBF versions of the heavyweight title.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | January 22, 2004
Baltimore native Hasim Rahman will begin his comeback attempt on March 11 at Michael's Eighth Avenue in Glen Burnie, where he will fight former cruiserweight world champion Al Cole, Rahman said yesterday. "Basically we have a restructuring program mapped out to get me back to a title shot, and we're coming home to where it all started," Rahman, 31, said from the Las Vegas home he purchased in August. "It's a match at home against a durable former world champion that's part of a keep-busy plan.
SPORTS
By Steven Petrella and The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2012
It has been said that many of America's future heavyweight boxing champions are hidden on various football fields and basketball courts across the country. Gone are the days of supreme athletes choosing a career between the ropes over one in the NFL  or NBA.  But now, seven knee surgeries later, a former linebacker has gone from the football field and into the ring in an attempt to bring the heavyweight title back to the United States.  ...
SPORTS
Sports Digest | July 8, 2012
Major League Lacrosse Bayhawks fall victim to late comeback, lose at Charlotte, 13-12 The expansion Charlotte Hounds handed the visiting Chesapeake Bayhawks their first loss since May 12 on Saturday night, coming from behind to win, 13-12. Leading by three with just under six minutes to play, the Bayhawks (7-2), who remain in first place despite the setback, fell apart on the defensive end. The Hounds pulled to within 12-11 on back-to-back unassisted goals from Matt Danowski . Jeff Reynolds (Calvert Hall, Maryland)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Eck, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2010
Jake Hager was all set to enter the real world after graduating from the University of Oklahoma four years ago with a degree in business finance. As he was about to begin working full time at a finance firm in Dallas, however, a piece of mail came to his home that drastically altered his plans. It was a contract offer to wrestle for World Wrestling Entertainment. Goodbye, real world; hello, surreal world. "I had to call [the finance firm] and tell them that I was going to wear spandex and baby oil for a living," he said.
SPORTS
By LEM SATTERFIELD and LEM SATTERFIELD,SUN REPORTER | August 12, 2006
LAS VEGAS -- Weighing in at a ripped 235 pounds Thursday, Hasim Rahman was told he looked like a bodybuilder heading into tonight's heavyweight title bout against Oleg Maskaev. "No, what I look like is what a heavyweight champ should look like," said Rahman, the Baltimore native who holds the World Boxing Council crown. "A bodybuilder is going to wish he could do what I'm going to do on Saturday night." Rahman needs a solid performance to maintain his hopes of a showdown with International Boxing Federation champ Wladimir Klitschko, if not to silence critics of what has been an up-and-down career.
SPORTS
By LEM SATTERFIELD and LEM SATTERFIELD,SUN REPORTER | August 10, 2006
When heavyweight Oleg Maskaev met trainer Victor Valle Jr. nearly 3 1/2 years ago at Gleason's Gym in Brooklyn, N.Y., Maskaev was shadow-boxing and - it appeared - a shadow of the fighter he once was. "I was alone, just going through the motions," Maskaev said, recalling an 18-month period when, at the age of 33, he had gone 2-3 and was knocked out three times. WBC heavyweight title fight Hasim Rahman (41-5-2, 33 KOs) vs. Oleg Maskaev (32-5, 25 KOs), Saturday, approx. 11 p.m., Las Vegas
SPORTS
August 10, 2006
Will you be watching Hasim Rahman defend his heavyweight title? I'll be watching and rooting for Rahman because: he's a Baltimore guy, he hasn't been involved in doping and he's not afraid to talk to people about his loss to Maskaev. Baltimore sports fans need Rahman, and he needs us. David Boyd White Hall NEXT QUESTION Would Maurice Clarett have stayed out of trouble if he had finished out his career at Ohio State? Selected responses to today's question will be printed tomorrow on The Kickoff page.
SPORTS
May 10, 2001
A chronology of the demise in credibility among the world boxing organizations and the rise of the role of television and cable networks. Early 1930s: The middleweight division splinters into two factions, with champs like Baltimore's Vince Dundee and Teddy Yaroz carrying the titles of the New York State Athletic Commission - then the most powerful and recognized sanctioning body - and Al Hostak, Solly Krieger and Tony Zale being crowned by the National...
SPORTS
By Robert Seltzer and Robert Seltzer,Knight-Ridder | January 17, 1992
He was not an actor, but he generated more drama than a troupe of Broadway stars.He was not a magician, but his hands were so fast that slow-motion cameras sometimes failed to pick up his punches.He was not a politician, but he could be more elo-quent and impassioned than those who were.And although it seems impossible, Muhammad Ali, the man who captivated both the sports world and the "real" world with his skill, wit and grace, turns 50 today.Fifty.Some fans may remember him as the athlete of towering skills who made some of his bouts look as easy as shadow-boxing sessions.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 13, 2006
Record books show that former heavyweight champion Floyd Patterson, who died Thursday in New York, was the first man to win the title twice. Actually, Patterson should have won it three times -- and would have won it three times, if it weren't for a referee in desperate need of cataract surgery. The first came on Nov. 30, 1956, exactly 30 days before my 5th birthday. As a child born in the early 1950s, I remember Patterson most vividly as the first heavyweight champion whose name was mentioned by my elders.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | March 20, 2006
So, tonight we will say farewell to the World Baseball Classic until 2009, when - we can only hope - some of the wrinkles will be ironed out and the Orioles will not have to supply all the players. The inaugural baseball "World Cup," regardless of the outcome of tonight's showdown between Cuba and Japan, should be viewed as a qualified success. Major League Baseball succeeded in creating an exciting event that extended the international reach of the sport while introducing American fans to an outside world of baseball talent they barely knew existed.
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