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By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 22, 1994
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- U.S. special forces took control last night of the Haitian army's only heavy weapons cache, while American soldiers expressed concern about Haitian police mistreatment of civilians they came to protect.U.S. special forces seized Haitian anti-aircraft and anti-tank guns and armored personnel carriers, at Camp d'Application, the military academy at Petionville, in the hills outside the capital city.The weapons will be disarmed today and put on display "for all to see."
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NEWS
June 14, 2013
Having determined that the government of Syrian President Bashar Assad has used chemical weapons against his opponents in the country's bloody two-year civil war, the Obama administration is now reportedly preparing to send lethal military aid to rebel forces battling the regime. Mr. Obama said earlier this year that any use of chemical weapons by the Syrian military would cross a "red line" that invited a U.S. response. Now that American intelligence has confirmed Syria has crossed that line, the U.S. response must be measured but leave no doubt that the use of such weapons will not be tolerated.
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NEWS
May 19, 1994
Bosnian Serbs released 11 French aid workers seized April on charges they were smuggling arms to the Muslims. Though the French government had demanded the unconditional release the captives, their humanitarian group paid $44,000 in "bail."Plans to test a Bosnian Serb cease-fire pledge at the TUZLA airport were canceled when civilian pilots refused to risk making supply flights. U.N. flights were suspended Tuesday when Serb shells struck the airport shortly after a plane landed.A mortar shell landed near the SARAJEVO airport, a clear violation of a 3-month-old local cease-fire and a NATO ban on heavy weapons around the city.
NEWS
By Colin McMahon and Colin McMahon,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 10, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Militia fighters loyal to a defiant Shiite cleric promised yesterday to lay down their heavy weapons in the Sadr City area of Baghdad, a potential victory for Iraqi officials eager to impose stability ahead of national elections. The agreement, due to go into effect tomorrow, could set the stage for Muqtada al-Sadr to disband his al-Mahdi Army and turn it into a political organization. Aides to the Shiite cleric have been discussing the political path with Iraqi authorities.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 21, 1994
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Nearly all the Serbian guns ringing the Bosnian capital are out of action, United Nations officials said early this morning after a frantic day of diplomatic meetings, maneuvering behind the scenes and hoisting rusty cannons out of snowbanks."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 17, 1995
ZAGREB, Croatia -- NATO warned the Bosnian Serbs yesterday that if they did not accelerate the withdrawal of heavy weapons ringing Sarajevo in the next 24 hours, attacks by NATO warplanes and missile strikes on Serbian positions would resume.United Nations officials said the Bosnian Serbs had withdrawn only a dozen artillery pieces and tanks from the heights overlooking the city, despite promises made Thursday to pull out some 200 heavy weapons in exchange for an end to NATO air attacks on Serbian positions.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Sun Staff Writer | April 27, 1994
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- As Bosnian Serb soldiers halted their attack on the besieged city of Gorazde last weekend, they didn't exactly leap to comply with a NATO ultimatum to retreat or else.Not only were they slow to move their men and artillery, but they blocked convoys of food and first aid. While pulling back, they destroyed homes and burned a water purification plant. Even now, United Nations officials say, a few Serbian soldiers remain in the heart of the city, a zone they were supposed to have evacuated by Sunday.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 19, 1995
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- With an emotional outburst at the funeral of a slain relative a week ago, President Jean-Bertrand Aristide set off an outbreak of street violence, provoked panic among Haiti's elite, and undermined his relations with the United States and other members of the international coalition that restored him to power a year ago.At least seven people have been killed and more than a score wounded in the unrest that erupted after Mr. Aristide...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 20, 1994
PALE, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- In chaos compounded by heavy snow, Serbian forces ringing Sarajevo stepped up efforts yesterday to place their heavy weapons under United Nations guard or pull them back from the besieged capital in compliance with a NATO ultimatum.With the deadline less than 36 hours away, U.N. troops seemed to be scrambling to keep track of the operation, and it was by no means clear in the snow-covered hills whether the peacekeepers could control the arms that were handed over.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | January 6, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A senior U.S. official predicted yesterda that U.S. troops will be able to transfer most of the responsibility for securing Somalian relief to the United Nations in about six weeks.His timetable, more precise than any offered previously by the United States, came a day after Defense Secretary Dick Cheney said that U.S. troops would start withdrawing toward the end of this month, shortly after President-elect Bill Clinton's inauguration.The transfer to the United Nations would mean that most, if not all, U.S. ground forces could be withdrawn, although the United States intends to keep support forces in Somalia and Marines offshore in case they are needed.
NEWS
By Douglas M. Birch and Douglas M. Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 6, 2004
KABUL, Afghanistan - Quiet and wary, looking a little apprehensive, Abdul Fatah finally gave up the life of a hired gun yesterday. The baby-faced, broad-shouldered 32-year-old from the plains of Logar province, south of Kabul, has spent his adulthood as a warrior in a private militia fighting against Soviet forces, the Taliban and his commander's rivals. Killing has been his profession, war a way of life. All that ended officially after Fatah showed up at a United Nations compound here to receive a gold-colored medal, a certificate of thanks signed by President Hamid Karzai, and several hundred pounds of wheat, beans, salt and other staples.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 19, 1995
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- With an emotional outburst at the funeral of a slain relative a week ago, President Jean-Bertrand Aristide set off an outbreak of street violence, provoked panic among Haiti's elite, and undermined his relations with the United States and other members of the international coalition that restored him to power a year ago.At least seven people have been killed and more than a score wounded in the unrest that erupted after Mr. Aristide...
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 19, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Quagmire -- the word that embodied American involvement in Vietnam a quarter century ago now hangs over the Clinton administration's plan to send 20,000 U.S. peacekeepers to Bosnia.The vision of Americans being drawn into a crisis in Central Europe that is easier to get into than out of is at the heart of congressional and public misgivings over the mission.It is not a new concern. That legacy of Vietnam was revived in 1983 in Lebanon when 241 American troops, mostly Marines, died in a terrorist attack, and was recalled again in 1993 in Somalia when a humanitarian mission turned into a misguided political intervention and cost the lives of 30 Americans, 18 of them Army Rangers killed in a single firefight.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 17, 1995
ZAGREB, Croatia -- NATO warned the Bosnian Serbs yesterday that if they did not accelerate the withdrawal of heavy weapons ringing Sarajevo in the next 24 hours, attacks by NATO warplanes and missile strikes on Serbian positions would resume.United Nations officials said the Bosnian Serbs had withdrawn only a dozen artillery pieces and tanks from the heights overlooking the city, despite promises made Thursday to pull out some 200 heavy weapons in exchange for an end to NATO air attacks on Serbian positions.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 22, 1994
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- U.S. special forces took control last night of the Haitian army's only heavy weapons cache, while American soldiers expressed concern about Haitian police mistreatment of civilians they came to protect.U.S. special forces seized Haitian anti-aircraft and anti-tank guns and armored personnel carriers, at Camp d'Application, the military academy at Petionville, in the hills outside the capital city.The weapons will be disarmed today and put on display "for all to see."
NEWS
May 19, 1994
Bosnian Serbs released 11 French aid workers seized April on charges they were smuggling arms to the Muslims. Though the French government had demanded the unconditional release the captives, their humanitarian group paid $44,000 in "bail."Plans to test a Bosnian Serb cease-fire pledge at the TUZLA airport were canceled when civilian pilots refused to risk making supply flights. U.N. flights were suspended Tuesday when Serb shells struck the airport shortly after a plane landed.A mortar shell landed near the SARAJEVO airport, a clear violation of a 3-month-old local cease-fire and a NATO ban on heavy weapons around the city.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 24, 1994
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- A mortar blast, a surge in machine-gun fire, a thwarted aid delivery and U.N. discovery of dozens more heavy weapons in Serbian-held territory made clear yesterday that the siege of Sarajevo has not ended.Although the capital remains calm in comparison with the unbridled bombardment of the previous 22 months, United Nations officials are finding it more difficult each day to pass off the NATO ultimatum for ending the strangulation of this city as a resounding success.
NEWS
By Douglas M. Birch and Douglas M. Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 6, 2004
KABUL, Afghanistan - Quiet and wary, looking a little apprehensive, Abdul Fatah finally gave up the life of a hired gun yesterday. The baby-faced, broad-shouldered 32-year-old from the plains of Logar province, south of Kabul, has spent his adulthood as a warrior in a private militia fighting against Soviet forces, the Taliban and his commander's rivals. Killing has been his profession, war a way of life. All that ended officially after Fatah showed up at a United Nations compound here to receive a gold-colored medal, a certificate of thanks signed by President Hamid Karzai, and several hundred pounds of wheat, beans, salt and other staples.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Sun Staff Writer | April 27, 1994
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- As Bosnian Serb soldiers halted their attack on the besieged city of Gorazde last weekend, they didn't exactly leap to comply with a NATO ultimatum to retreat or else.Not only were they slow to move their men and artillery, but they blocked convoys of food and first aid. While pulling back, they destroyed homes and burned a water purification plant. Even now, United Nations officials say, a few Serbian soldiers remain in the heart of the city, a zone they were supposed to have evacuated by Sunday.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 24, 1994
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- A mortar blast, a surge in machine-gun fire, a thwarted aid delivery and U.N. discovery of dozens more heavy weapons in Serbian-held territory made clear yesterday that the siege of Sarajevo has not ended.Although the capital remains calm in comparison with the unbridled bombardment of the previous 22 months, United Nations officials are finding it more difficult each day to pass off the NATO ultimatum for ending the strangulation of this city as a resounding success.
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