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By Tom Malone | February 12, 2010
Since the snow and the Winter Olympics bring Canada to mind this week, and since folks have asked ... yes, we do get snows like this up north (and sometimes worse) -- but not very often, especially with accelerating climate change in the last few decades. The big differences I'm noticing between the Canadian and Baltimorean snow experiences are, first, the government's ability to deal with it; and second, citizen reactions. First, the government. We pay higher taxes in Canada, and most of us don't mind.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
Forecasts suggest a mix of snow, sleet and rain from Sunday afternoon through Monday in the Baltimore area. Meteorologists expect a low-pressure system to form and pass over the region Monday, bringing some messy precipitation ahead of it and likely snow behind it, according the National Weather Service. Forecasters predict a mix of rain and sleet Sunday night, with temperatures in the lower- to mid-30s. Precipitation was expected to shift to rain with temperatures climbing into the lower 40s Monday.
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NEWS
February 28, 2010
The National Guard has 40 people working to help officials in Western Maryland cope with a snowstorm that has battered the region. Heavy snow and blizzard conditions have hit Garrett County, where officials have declared a state of emergency. National Guard Lt. Col. Charles Kohler says two Humvees and two other heavy trucks have been sent to the area. He says the vehicles will be used to help local emergency officials that may not be able to get through the snow. For instance, the trucks can take people to hospitals for medical care or take firefighters to places their vehicles can't reach.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2013
For a region accustomed to fizzled snow forecasts in recent years, a storm dumping as much as 8 inches of snow across northern Maryland surprised many on Sunday, stalling vehicles, canceling the city's annual holiday parade and blanketing the field at M&T Bank Stadium for the Ravens' first snow game in Baltimore. Snow plows struggled to keep up and more challenges were expected for road crews overnight. A forecast of sleet and freezing rain to fall on top of the snow was expected to make for an icy Monday morning commute.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 5, 2010
Gov. Martin O'Malley said Marylanders will wake this morning to the most impassable streets since the 27-inch-deep snowstorm of 2003 -- and, if they have power, will learn that perhaps 100,000 households have not been as lucky. In a late afternoon news conference at the State Highway Administration operations center in Hanover, the governor said the overnight snowstorm was expected to be much heavier and wetter than the December snowstorm that dumped 20-22 inches of fluffy powder on the region.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,Staff Writer | February 24, 1993
In a delayed effect from Sunday's heavy snow, the walk-through marsh aviary of the Baltimore Zoo's Maryland Wilderness section collapsed and four ducks took advantage of ripped netting to fly the coop -- at least temporarily.None of the 37 birds occupying the open-air exhibit was hurt, but the collapse discovered by keepers Monday morning caused thousands of dollars in damage that will force the closing of the aviary, probably until April, said Brian A. Rutledge, the zoo director.The collapse, he said, was caused by temperature changes that first began melting the snow and then caused it to freeze over the net openings.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2003
The three-day Presidents Day weekend storm in Maryland had its origins in a Pacific rainstorm that soaked the Los Angeles area with torrential rains, then crossed the country and collided with stubborn arctic air entrenched across the Northeast. Its legacy will likely be the biggest snowstorm in Baltimore in more than seven years, weather experts said, with total accumulations that might rival some of the deepest snowfalls in the city's history. "I would say we're destined here for the top five, and we've got a good shot at the top three," said Todd Miner, a meteorologist with Penn State Weather Communications.
SPORTS
By From Staff Reports | March 3, 1994
Penn National, Rosecroft and Charles Town canceled last night's racing cards because of severe winter weather and heavy snow.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 6, 2001
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. workers were to leave today for Philadelphia to help restore power to thousands of homes and businesses that lost service in yesterday's storm, which left up to 10 inches of wet, heavy snow in the Pensylvania city. Brenda Pettigrew, a BGE spokeswoman, said the workers will assist Philadelphia Electric Co. crews. Pettigrew said 35 BGE repair trucks with two-man crews and about 20 support and supervisory personnel will gather today at 6:30 a.m. at Maryland House Restaurant on Interstate 95 in Aberdeen and form a convoy to Philadelphia.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | December 22, 2006
Here's Rodney Boyette of Annapolis: "As we approach that time of year when we hopefully will hear snow in the forecast, please explain the difference between `snow showers' and `snow flurries.'" Hopefully? You must be a teacher. The National Weather Service defines a snow flurry as an "intermittent snowfall of short duration" with no measureable accumulation. A snow shower is "a short duration of light to moderate snowfall." Accumulations are "possible." A heavy snow shower with sudden, strong winds is a snow "squall."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2013
Unlike Wednesday's snowstorm that failed to materialize amid forecasters' dire predictions, the Blizzard of '93 roared into Maryland the weekend of March 13-14 with a wallop, dumping a foot of snow on Baltimore while raking the state with almost hurricane-like winds before racing northward into New England. The cyclonic storm was born over the Gulf of Mexico on March 12, and at its maximum, it extended from Canada to Central America. It bore down on Cuba, where it killed 10, and then turned its ferocity on the East Coast.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2013
The longer snowflakes were kept at bay, the faster the wisecracks started coming in on Twitter and Facebook. "I remember when I was a kid in the 70's and they predicted storms accurately 7 days in advance," Havre de Grace resident Jason Falkenstine tweeted. "It would be nice to have an apology from meteorologist for being totally wrong," Baltimore resident Jason Sellers wrote. Meteorologists offered a mea culpa for predictions of Baltimore's biggest snowfall in two years.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
A late-season storm was forecast to bring the first significant snowfall in Baltimore in two years Wednesday, prompting worries about travel difficulties and power outages from the wet, heavy flakes and strong wind. The National Weather Service forecasts snowfall of 6 to 12 inches north and west of Interstate 95, though a rain mix along the I-95 corridor could reduce accumulations. The storm, which dumped nearly a foot of snow on the northern Plains states, could bring intense bands of heavier precipitation in some areas, forecasters warned.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
The National Weather Service is forecasting that a system dumping as much as 2 feet of snow and significant ice accumulation across the Plains states will bring an inch or less of snow to Maryland on Friday, along with a mix of sleet, freezing rain and rain. Thursday morning, 4 inches of snow fell within 90 minutes in North Kansas City, 2 inches within half an hour in Kansas City, and snowfall totals of 5-6 inches and rising were recorded, according to reports made to the weather service in Kansas City.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2013
A blizzard was expected to dump a couple of feet of snow across New England through midday today, and while Baltimore was largely spared, the storm delivered some wintry precipitation and headaches for travelers. At Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, dozens of flights to and from the Northeast were canceled, leaving some travelers scrambling to brave snowy roads in rental cars. Others landed there Friday from points north, escaping ahead of the expected 2 feet of snow, only to find limited options for getting anywhere else.
EXPLORE
January 25, 2012
From The Aegis of Jan. 29, 1987: Harford County got hit with back-to-back snow storms this week in 1987, when 20 inches of snow fell and left the county at a standstill. The first storm hit Jan. 22, a Thursday, dropping a foot of white stuff. "Battered and weary, the County slowly came to its feet, a stunned but determined fighter," read The Aegis. Just a few days later, Sunday into Monday, another 8 inches fell, leaving roads closed, people homebound and snow removal crews working long hours.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,Staff Writer | March 12, 1993
The last days of winter could bring Central Maryland its biggest snowstorm in a decade, with the first flakes falling tonight and continuing into Sunday, weather forecasters warned yesterday.How bad might it be?The customarily cautious Fred Davis, the area's chief meteorologist for the National Weather Service, does not use the word "blizzard" lightly -- but yesterday he went so far as to say that blizzard conditions are a possibility.In the Baltimore area, a blizzard -- defined as 35 mph winds, with blowing snow reducing visibility to 500 feet or less -- hasn't happened since Feb. 11, 1983, when the area was paralyzed by a near-record 22 inches of snow.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | January 6, 1996
Snow accumulating 1 to 3 inches is forecast for Central Maryland starting late tonight, continuing tomorrow and possibly lingering through Tuesday, the National Weather Service said yesterday.A winter storm approaching from the Deep South is expected to dump most of the snow south of Washington, where accumulations could reach 8 inches.The storm also will bring markedly colder weather to Central Maryland.Today's high in the Baltimore area probably won't get above 30, with tomorrow's top temperature in the mid-20s, the National Weather Service predicted.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2011
Ethan Yankellow pondered the last time he saw snow in the Baltimore area at this time of year — and drew a blank. "I don't remember any time I saw snow in October, and I've lived here all my life," Yankellow, 42, said Saturday. The Reisterstown man was among many area residents who marveled at Saturday's wintry mix in autumn, as snow, sleet and rain combined to coat many secondary roads in the Baltimore area while leaving more than half a foot of snow in points west. Throughout the region, the precipitation made for hazardous travel conditions.
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