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By Tom Keegan and Tom Keegan,Sun Staff Writer | June 8, 1994
Heavy metal.To many, the only thing more distasteful than the music itself are some of the freaks who listen to it.You know the stereotype. Long, stringy, greasy hair. Rotting teeth. A faint mustache that easily could pass for either axle grease or cookie crumbs. Jeans so badly in need of a spin in the washer that they should be condemned, or at the very least fumigated.You know, brain-dead burnouts.Giggling, drug-abusing, head-jerking, devil-worshiping human pollutants of the planet earth.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2010
If the directors get their hands on some magic editing scissors, Keith Chester's "The Skeptics: In A World of Their Own" and Jeff Krulik's "Heavy Metal Picnic," new movies about mid-'80s Maryland rock, will some day be a tight, hard-driving double-bill. Right now they're a couple of indelible curiosities playing Friday at different places: "Heavy Metal Picnic" at 9:30 p.m. at the AFI Silver and "The Skeptics: In a World of Their Own" at 7 p.m. at Creative Alliance 's Patterson Theater.
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By Teresa Gubbins and Teresa Gubbins,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | March 9, 1996
Despite limited cult success the first time around, the animated 1981 film "Heavy Metal" returned to theaters yesterday with remastered soundtrack and color.When first released, the film, a spinoff of the Heavy Metal comic book published by the National Lampoon organization, followeda mini-wave of post-'60s adult animation led by Ralph Bakshi's "Fritz the Cat." "Heavy Metal" consists of six short science-fiction stories, each drawn by a different group of animators, but all sharing an emphasis on sex, drugs and rock and roll.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2010
In the video for their 1980s single "Don't Close Your Eyes," Kix lead singer Steve Whiteman screams the high notes and shakes his shoulder-length mop of blond hair. Behind him, the rest of the band members, long-haired and hard-rocking, carve their way through the hit power ballad. When Kix plays "Don't Close Your Eyes" at concerts nowadays, they look and sound as if the '80s never ended. Whiteman, still skinny as a rail, has no problem hitting those atmospheric high notes, and guitarists Ronnie Younkins and Brian Forsythe's riffs are as sharp and crunchy as ever.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | June 21, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- Lately, a series of breakups have rocked the heavy metal rock scene. Vince Neil, for example, left Motley Crue, and singer Joey Belladonna was booted out of Anthrax just days after the band signed a lucrative new contract with Elektra Records.Slowly but surely, these and other dramas seem to be working them selves out. Mr. Neil recently announced the identities of his new band, and included in the lineup is former Billy Idol sidekick, Steve Stevens. Mr. Neil's Warner Bros. Records solo debut album should be out in fall.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jess Blumberg | September 19, 2002
When the Baltimore Public Works Museum celebrates its 20th birthday on Saturday, there will be no typical party. Instead, the museum is marking the occasion with a Heavy Metal Birthday Bash, offering guests a chance to interact with the machines that keep the city clean. Equipment including a dump truck, a line-painting machine and a fire engine will be on site for guests to climb aboard and operate (in some cases). Kids can wear uniforms, gloves and hard hats and pretend to be workers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | June 28, 1991
Ask Scott Ian about the Clash of the Titans tour, and he immediately agrees that the package -- which, in addition to his own band, Anthrax, also includes Slayer and Megadeth -- is "about as metal as it gets."Ask him if that means Anthrax is a heavy metal band, however, and he has to chew the question over before answering."I can't even answer that," he says, finally. Speaking over the phone from a tour stop in Buffalo, he says, "I get asked that all the time -- people want to know what kind of band we are, and I don't know what to say. Really, there is no answer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Doug Gill and J. Doug Gill,Special to The Sun | April 15, 1994
Before Rob Halford's new band, Fight, had released so much as a single, the lead singer's smoothly shaven head was plastered across the pages of nearly every American music magazine, usually under a banner headline proclaiming a rebirth of heavy metal.The ravenous U.S. pop press is like that; the anointing of a legend is a time-honored tradition. But so is the drowning of said legend in the critical backwash that normally follows.However, five months in on the umpteenth leg of Fight's current club tour, the flood of questions that surrounded Halford's departure into uncharted solo waters has turned into a tidal wave of adulation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | December 7, 1990
Judas Priest When: Sunday, Dec. 9, 7:30 p.m.Where: Capital CentreTickets: $19.50Call: 481-6000 for tickets, 792-7490 for information. Rob Halford is a believer.He believes in his band, Judas Priest, the English heavy-metal outfit he has fronted for almost 20 years (and which he'll bring to the Capital Centre Sunday). He believes in his fans, whose high-decibel, fist-pumping enthusiasm has helped Judas Priest become one of the genre's most enduring acts.Above all, he believes in heavy metal, a style of music he feels is unjustly maligned.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | April 9, 1991
The smoke-clouded stage rocked with the high shriek of metal and thecheers of fans in black leather and earrings.But the group Rez (for Resurrection) wasn't turning any crosses upside down in satanic symbolism.While the guitars screamed loud enough to satisfy the hardest metal fan at the Calvary Temple in Millersville Friday, the band's lyrics lauded "Our Great God in Heaven."And while the audience wore jean jackets dripping with the jagged letters of the metal look, the slogans advertised living the good life with Jesus, things like "New Life" and "God Rules" and "He died for me."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | May 28, 2009
Rock 'n' roll will never die - not even that senses-shattering mix of big hair and screeching guitars that marked the '80s. Just ask a man who should know. "Heavy metal itself, I always call it the cockroach of rock 'n' roll," says Twisted Sister frontman Dee Snider, whose "We're Not Gonna Take It" helped define the era. "It thrives in the corners and cracks." The clocks will be rolled back about a quarter-century at Columbia's Merriweather Post Pavilion on Saturday, as the M3 Rock Festival - the name stands for May Merriweather Metal - brings some of the era's biggest and loudest acts to Maryland.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | January 6, 2008
The New Yorker dubbed Hamilton native Matthew Porterfield's Hamilton "one of the most original, moving, and accomplished American independent films in recent years," hailing Porterfield's "genius" for "light and color" and "tender yet unsentimental images." (A hit at the 2006 Maryland Film Festival, it will be screened next on Jan. 27, at 7 p.m., at the AFI Silver.) Porterfield, 30, plans to follow that low-budget tale of missed connections among unwed teen parents in Northeast Baltimore with a more ambitious feature, Metal Gods, co-written and produced by his Hamilton partner Jordan Mintzer.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,Sun reporter | December 16, 2007
It's hard to stand out in a wonderland of kitsch, but Jim Pollock does just that. In 1996, the scrap-metal artist made a tiny Christmas tree out of hubcaps. Today, it's 8 feet high, incorporates more than 100 wheel covers and stands in front of his house at 708 W. 34th St. in Hampden, a dented destination of choice for the thousands who crowd his block for the famed miracle of lights every holiday season. They come for his hospitality - he opens his home to visitors, including 30,000 last year - but also for the whimsy in his work.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN REPORTER | November 26, 2007
Tim Winter stood at a Manhattan cab stand hearing passers-by spewing a torrent of four-letter words. He was, oddly enough, headed to a seminar partly about profanity in society. "I heard more F-bombs at that moment than I've heard from other communities in an entire year," said Winter, president of the Parents Television Council, a media watch group. It recently accused major television networks of "hijacking" prime time by airing shows laced with sex, violence and coarse language during the early evening - what used to be known as the "family hour."
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 11, 2007
On the same day that Osama bin Laden happened to release another defiant tape, a sizable audience gathered at the Clarice Smith Center in College Park for a provocative presentation by the Kronos Quartet titled Awakening: A Musical Mediation on the Anniversary of 9/11. Alternately moving, confrontational, reflective and exasperating, the 13-part work, brilliantly performed Friday night, brings together music from a variety of sources, cultures and times to create a roughly 100-minute exercise in performance art. It was first performed last year in San Francisco.
ENTERTAINMENT
By ALLIE SEMENZA | May 24, 2007
Heavy metal band Godsmack makes a stop in Washington on Saturday at DAR Constitution Hall. The longtime band has amassed legions of fans over the years, as well as a Grammy nomination, while also drawing comparisons to heavy metal royalty Alice in Chains. DAR Constitution Hall is at 18th and D streets Northwest. The show starts at 8 p.m. Tickets are $38.50. Call 410-547-SEAT or go to ticketmaster.com.
FEATURES
By Randi Henderson Sun pop music critic J. D. Considine contributed to this article | January 23, 1991
What do U.S. fighter pilots listen to as they set out on bombing missions over Iraq?Heavy metal music -- Van Halen is a popular choice -- according to one Air Force pilot, who told a reporter Sunday that fliers slip earphones for portable cassette players under their official headsets, so they can hear rock and roll along with military radio communications.That piece of information disturbs military officials, delights the lead singer for Van Halen and makes a lot of sense to music therapist Louise Lynch.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | July 19, 1992
Were the Sex Pistols a heavy metal band?Of course not. In fact, the question seems almost too silly to even ask. After all, what could any heavy metal act have in common with a bunch of spike-haired, safety-pinned punks like Rotten, Vicious and company?More than you'd think, actually. As much as punk's anti-glamour aesthetic seemed the very antithesis of metal's party-hearty hedonism, the two styles actually have quite a bit in common. That's not merely a matter of (bad) attitude, either.
NEWS
By CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | January 12, 2007
Federal researchers said yesterday they have identified the toxin released by Pfiesteria, the microscopic marine organism blamed for mass fish killings and human health problems in the Chesapeake Bay and elsewhere in the late 1990s. Peter Moeller, a chemist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, studied the marine organism over the past seven years and said he has concluded that heavy metals - mainly a copper sulfur complex - cause Pfiesteria to release a toxin that stuns fish and destroys skin, leaving bloody lesions and causing death.
BUSINESS
By LORRAINE MIRABELLA, ROB HIAASEN AND SAM SESSA and LORRAINE MIRABELLA, ROB HIAASEN AND SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTERS | May 24, 2006
Hammerjacks, once a Baltimore icon of heavy metal and rock, will close Saturday after the sale of its building to developers. The club never regained its legendary status after its reincarnation in 2000 in a two-story brick building on Guilford Avenue, where disc jockeys spinning dance club numbers and hip-hop were more common than live music. But in the days before the cavernous club under an Interstate 395 overpass was razed and paved over for Ravens stadium parking, bands such as Guns `N' Roses and the Ramones could practically make the expressway vibrate.
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