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NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | May 29, 1991
The City Council is considering two bills that would create tougher zoning restrictions for industries that use toxic chemicals in the Brooklyn-Curtis Bay communities of South Baltimore.Two community associations requested the bills, which were introduced at last night's council meeting. Brooklyn-Curtis Bay residents and industry representatives are expected to clash when hearings are held on the bills.One bill would require council approval before new industries could operate on land zoned M-2 or M-3 in Brooklyn-Curtis Bay.Currently, new industries must only obtain the appropriate permits, and council approval is not required to operate in M-2 or M-3 districts, which are zoned for heavy industry, said Councilman Edward L. Reisinger, D-6th, who introduced the bill.
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NEWS
By Rebecca Ruggles | September 17, 2014
The shelving of a plan to build a new CSX rail facility in the West Baltimore residential neighborhood of Morrell Park was decried recently as a setback for regional job growth and a sign of failed leadership by CSX. But articles in The Baltimore Sun and the Baltimore Business Journal omitted mention of the successful leadership of health advocates and community members who insisted that specific health consequences of the planned facility be addressed....
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NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2004
Thirty years ago, when the city last considered its industrial zoning plan, manufacturing was king. Few anticipated that someday people would spend millions to live next to those grimy factories. Or that so many of Baltimore's blue-collar behemoths wouldn't make it to 2004. Now, as city planners revisit those dusty zoning rules, they struggle to balance the needs of the city's remaining factories and manufacturers, which often awkwardly co-exist next to upscale homes and condos, with the needs of more modern businesses that the city must also attract to stay viable and competitive.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2004
Thirty years ago, when the city last considered its industrial zoning plan, manufacturing was king. Few anticipated that someday people would spend millions to live next to those grimy factories. Or that so many of Baltimore's blue-collar behemoths wouldn't make it to 2004. Now, as city planners revisit those dusty zoning rules, they struggle to balance the needs of the city's remaining factories and manufacturers, which often awkwardly co-exist next to upscale homes and condos, with the needs of more modern businesses that the city must also attract to stay viable and competitive.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1998
Residents of Wagner's Point wrote this week to 10 petrochemical companies whose plants ring the tiny South Baltimore neighborhood, asking their chief executives to make "modest" financial contributions to a buyout and relocation of the neighborhood."
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | August 19, 1992
BEIJING -- China's environment is being destroyed on a massive scale because of the nation's rapid economic development, heavy population load, intensive farming and weak regulatory efforts, a comprehensive World Bank report obtained by The Sun has concluded.The two-volume report -- the most comprehensive, independent study of China's environmental problems -- offers a bleak forecast for much of the world's largest nation."Drinking water in many cities is polluted and/or in short supply," the report says.
NEWS
By Walter Truett Anderson | May 13, 1997
ONE OF THE STRANGE, unexpected -- and still frequently overlooked -- features of today's economy is that all kinds of things are getting lighter. We still have heavy industry in the ''postindustrial age,'' but a lot of the things it produces aren't really all that heavy.Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan recently pointed out that, although the value of goods and services produced in the United States has increased several times over in the past half-century, the actual weight of current output is probably only modestly higher than it was 50 years ago. This has inspired the term ''weightless economy.
NEWS
By James Drake and James Drake,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 17, 1998
BOTOSANI, Romania -- Mitica Gavriliuc sinks into his leather armchair, checks the gold antique pocket watch he picked up on a recent vacation in London, and fires up a well-earned Marlboro. "I'll give you half an hour," he purrs, exhaling contentedly. "I'm feeling generous this evening."And so he should be. Thanks to him, the town of Botosani -- a standard Romanian provincial sprawl of crumbling high-rises and decrepit heavy industry -- now has a private medical clinic, staffed by specialist doctors moonlighting from the municipal hospital.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | May 8, 1992
'Twas under a spreading chestnut tree that the village smithy stood, the poet Longfellow said, and the mighty blacksmith wielded his hammers with arms as strong as iron bands.But no more, said Peter Wilkinson. The physical antithesis of the legendary village blacksmith, the 32-year-old transplanted Englishman produces the same artistry in iron and steel using the education, technique and modern equipment that he said has replaced sheer muscle power.Mr. Wilkinson learned his trade in a five-year apprenticeship -- studying college-level mechanical engineering, metallurgy and practical metal fabrication.
BUSINESS
By New York Times | November 15, 1991
WASHINGTON -- For the second time in 10 days, the House has defeated legislation that would have significantly changed the nation's 60-year-old banking laws.The vote last night, a defeat for both the White House and the House Democratic leadership, seemed likely to force President Bush and Congress to limit banking legislation this year to a measure that would do little more than shore up the nearly depleted deposit insurance fund by providing tens of billions of dollars in taxpayer loans.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2000
Don't say Locust Point is turning yuppie. Longtime residents in this industrial, waterfront enclave in southern Baltimore would have a fit. But Locust Point's blue collar is slowly getting a stripe of white as it becomes the latest part of the harbor's renaissance. Some changes might seem small -- the addition of bagels, salmon and cream cheese to the venerable Rallo's restaurant menu -- but bigger ones are coming. A sign of the future is Tide Point, a $53 million renovation of Procter & Gamble Co.'s former detergent plant that is expected to become a hub for Internet start-ups.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | August 20, 1999
Analysts say it's too soon to know just what Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s new major investors have in store for the company, but one thing appears certain: They won't be passive bystanders.Alfred Kingsley and Gary Duberstein -- the principals of Greenway Partners LP, which with its affiliates recently acquired 5.6 percent of Bethlehem -- are students of Carl Icahn, the corporate raider who gained notoriety in the 1980s for his hostile takeover of Trans World Airlines.Duberstein was Icahn's general counsel for eight years.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1998
Residents of Wagner's Point wrote this week to 10 petrochemical companies whose plants ring the tiny South Baltimore neighborhood, asking their chief executives to make "modest" financial contributions to a buyout and relocation of the neighborhood."
NEWS
By James Drake and James Drake,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 17, 1998
BOTOSANI, Romania -- Mitica Gavriliuc sinks into his leather armchair, checks the gold antique pocket watch he picked up on a recent vacation in London, and fires up a well-earned Marlboro. "I'll give you half an hour," he purrs, exhaling contentedly. "I'm feeling generous this evening."And so he should be. Thanks to him, the town of Botosani -- a standard Romanian provincial sprawl of crumbling high-rises and decrepit heavy industry -- now has a private medical clinic, staffed by specialist doctors moonlighting from the municipal hospital.
NEWS
By Walter Truett Anderson | May 13, 1997
ONE OF THE STRANGE, unexpected -- and still frequently overlooked -- features of today's economy is that all kinds of things are getting lighter. We still have heavy industry in the ''postindustrial age,'' but a lot of the things it produces aren't really all that heavy.Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan recently pointed out that, although the value of goods and services produced in the United States has increased several times over in the past half-century, the actual weight of current output is probably only modestly higher than it was 50 years ago. This has inspired the term ''weightless economy.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | August 19, 1992
BEIJING -- China's environment is being destroyed on a massive scale because of the nation's rapid economic development, heavy population load, intensive farming and weak regulatory efforts, a comprehensive World Bank report obtained by The Sun has concluded.The two-volume report -- the most comprehensive, independent study of China's environmental problems -- offers a bleak forecast for much of the world's largest nation."Drinking water in many cities is polluted and/or in short supply," the report says.
NEWS
By David Conn and David Conn,David Conn is a business writer for The Sun | October 28, 1990
It was beginning to look like such a promising decade. The end of corporate and personal greed. A thousand points of light. Freedom in the East. Continued prosperity.To George Carbonell, things were looking particularly fine. For years he had been the top producer in the real estate department of Marriott Corp.'s Fairfield Inns division, making a very comfortable living.But 1990 has brought to the Baltimore-Washington region what the Northeast and other areas have been suffering for the last few years: the start of an economic downturn that many are willing to call a recession, even if the technical numbers don't justify it.And this slowdown is hitting people in this state who never felt it before: people much higher on the income scale, people who wear white collars to work.
NEWS
By Rebecca Ruggles | September 17, 2014
The shelving of a plan to build a new CSX rail facility in the West Baltimore residential neighborhood of Morrell Park was decried recently as a setback for regional job growth and a sign of failed leadership by CSX. But articles in The Baltimore Sun and the Baltimore Business Journal omitted mention of the successful leadership of health advocates and community members who insisted that specific health consequences of the planned facility be addressed....
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | May 8, 1992
'Twas under a spreading chestnut tree that the village smithy stood, the poet Longfellow said, and the mighty blacksmith wielded his hammers with arms as strong as iron bands.But no more, said Peter Wilkinson. The physical antithesis of the legendary village blacksmith, the 32-year-old transplanted Englishman produces the same artistry in iron and steel using the education, technique and modern equipment that he said has replaced sheer muscle power.Mr. Wilkinson learned his trade in a five-year apprenticeship -- studying college-level mechanical engineering, metallurgy and practical metal fabrication.
BUSINESS
By New York Times | November 15, 1991
WASHINGTON -- For the second time in 10 days, the House has defeated legislation that would have significantly changed the nation's 60-year-old banking laws.The vote last night, a defeat for both the White House and the House Democratic leadership, seemed likely to force President Bush and Congress to limit banking legislation this year to a measure that would do little more than shore up the nearly depleted deposit insurance fund by providing tens of billions of dollars in taxpayer loans.
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