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Heavy Equipment Operator

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September 3, 2004
Paul Barclay Mulloy, a heavy equipment operator and mechanic who enjoyed riding all-terrain vehicles on his Carroll County farm, died of cancer Aug. 27 at his Woodbine home. He was 52. Mr. Mulloy was born in Sheboygan, Wis., and raised in Simpsonville, Howard County, where he had moved with his family in the late 1950s. He was a 1970 graduate of Atholton High School. He was a long-distance truck driver and later owned a rig for several years before becoming a heavy equipment operator and mechanic for Lane Construction Co. in 1997.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2013
Baltimore County has settled another lawsuit by a county worker who claimed to have been illegally forced out of his job. Under the agreement, William Galanti, a 71-year-old laborer in the Department of Public Works, will return to work Sept. 1 at a salary of about $45,600 and receive about $143,000 in back pay, pension adjustments, legal costs and damages, according to his attorney, Kathleen Cahill. Galanti had alleged that the county violated the Americans with Disabilities Act by making him retire after he fractured his hip when he fell on the job in 2011, even though he recovered within his available sick time.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2013
Baltimore County has settled another lawsuit by a county worker who claimed to have been illegally forced out of his job. Under the agreement, William Galanti, a 71-year-old laborer in the Department of Public Works, will return to work Sept. 1 at a salary of about $45,600 and receive about $143,000 in back pay, pension adjustments, legal costs and damages, according to his attorney, Kathleen Cahill. Galanti had alleged that the county violated the Americans with Disabilities Act by making him retire after he fractured his hip when he fell on the job in 2011, even though he recovered within his available sick time.
NEWS
By Kathy Van Mullekom and Kathy Van Mullekom,THE DAILY PRESS | April 17, 2005
You're building a house or putting a major addition on your home, and you've asked the builder to preserve a big white oak that you like. That's a smart request, because good trees add monetary value and visual interest to property. "Trees break up the architecture of a home and soften the hardscape," says Andrew Koenig, an arborist with Bartlett Tree Experts in Yorktown, Va. The company has offices throughout the country (www.bartlett.com). "It's important to take care of them any time there's heavy construction equipment in your yard."
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1996
A strike by heavy-equipment operators in Baltimore ended yesterday after negotiators reached the outline of a compromise on the key issue: time-and-a-half pay for Saturday work.Under the terms of the tentative deal, the five companies being struck by Local 37 of the International Union of Operating Engineers will agree not to discriminate against workers who already have worked 40 hours in a week when there is Saturday work to be awarded. The companies will not, however, guarantee time-and-a-half pay for all Saturday work -- what the union wanted.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1996
Heavy-equipment operators went on strike yesterday at an estimated 50 to 60 construction sites in metropolitan Baltimore, as workers sought to retrieve the Saturday overtime that they gave up during the deep construction downturn of the early 1990s.The strike began after members of Local 37 of the International Union of Operating Engineers voted down a proposed contract Monday. The offer from five companies represented by the Maryland Heavy and Highway Contractors Association Inc. followed expiration of the union's contract March 31. "The market has recovered substantially, and members feel that portions of the conditions we gave them then we want back, and one of them is Saturday overtime," said Ron DeJuliis, business manager for the Hamilton-based local.
NEWS
By Kathy Van Mullekom and Kathy Van Mullekom,THE DAILY PRESS | April 17, 2005
You're building a house or putting a major addition on your home, and you've asked the builder to preserve a big white oak that you like. That's a smart request, because good trees add monetary value and visual interest to property. "Trees break up the architecture of a home and soften the hardscape," says Andrew Koenig, an arborist with Bartlett Tree Experts in Yorktown, Va. The company has offices throughout the country (www.bartlett.com). "It's important to take care of them any time there's heavy construction equipment in your yard."
NEWS
August 3, 1993
Columbia Association honors workersThe Columbia Association has recognized the following employees for outstanding service:* Anne Cerfoy, program director, Before and After School Care;* Eric Colbert, heavy equipment operator, Open Space;* Bill Foley, head guard and instructor, Columbia Swim Center;* Nancy Kolb, front desk staff member, Columbia Athletic Club; and* Ted Nathurin, instructor, Supreme Sports Club.POLICE LOG* Town Center: Someone stole a horn, a JVC AM-FM stereo and $4 in change from a 1986 Nissan 200-SX between 8 p.m. and 11:30 p.m. Wednesday.
NEWS
October 16, 2007
Alan Royer Gnau, who built water-treatment facilities, died of a heart attack Thursday at Anne Arundel Medical Center. The Mayo resident was 62. Born in Catonsville and raised on Durley Lane, he was a 1963 City College graduate. As a young man, he was a heavy-equipment operator at Cherry Hill Construction Co. He owned Gnau Construction Co. of Edgewater for many years. He built the Crofton and Broadwater sewage-treatment plants. He owned a 53-foot boat, the Gnautilus, which he sailed to Ocean City in summers for deep-sea fishing.
NEWS
March 28, 2006
On March 26, 2006, FRANK W. THOMPSON, 87, of Parkton, MD. Husband of Donna E. (Ashe) Thompson; father of Gary Thompson, Larry Thompson and Linda Hilary all of Kingwood, WV, James Thompson of Canton, OH, and the late Timothy Thompson. Also survived by three grandchildren and three great grandchildren. Frank retired in 1980 as a heavy equipment operator at Bethlehem Steel, Sparrows Point, Baltimore, MD. He was also a coal miner, a farmer, and a member of Cedar Grove United Methodist Church, Parkton, MD. A funeral service will be held at 11 A.M. Thursday at the J. J. Hartenstein Mortuary, Inc., 24 Second St., New Freedom, PA. Viewing will be from 7 to 9 P.M. Wednesday at the mortuary.
NEWS
September 3, 2004
Paul Barclay Mulloy, a heavy equipment operator and mechanic who enjoyed riding all-terrain vehicles on his Carroll County farm, died of cancer Aug. 27 at his Woodbine home. He was 52. Mr. Mulloy was born in Sheboygan, Wis., and raised in Simpsonville, Howard County, where he had moved with his family in the late 1950s. He was a 1970 graduate of Atholton High School. He was a long-distance truck driver and later owned a rig for several years before becoming a heavy equipment operator and mechanic for Lane Construction Co. in 1997.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1996
A strike by heavy-equipment operators in Baltimore ended yesterday after negotiators reached the outline of a compromise on the key issue: time-and-a-half pay for Saturday work.Under the terms of the tentative deal, the five companies being struck by Local 37 of the International Union of Operating Engineers will agree not to discriminate against workers who already have worked 40 hours in a week when there is Saturday work to be awarded. The companies will not, however, guarantee time-and-a-half pay for all Saturday work -- what the union wanted.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1996
Heavy-equipment operators went on strike yesterday at an estimated 50 to 60 construction sites in metropolitan Baltimore, as workers sought to retrieve the Saturday overtime that they gave up during the deep construction downturn of the early 1990s.The strike began after members of Local 37 of the International Union of Operating Engineers voted down a proposed contract Monday. The offer from five companies represented by the Maryland Heavy and Highway Contractors Association Inc. followed expiration of the union's contract March 31. "The market has recovered substantially, and members feel that portions of the conditions we gave them then we want back, and one of them is Saturday overtime," said Ron DeJuliis, business manager for the Hamilton-based local.
NEWS
March 17, 2007
Leroy R. Cofield, a retired heavy equipment operator and longtime West Baltimore resident, died March 9 of pancreatitis at St. Agnes Hospital. He was 70. Mr. Cofield was born and raised in Edgecombe County, Va., and later moved to East Baltimore. He served in the Air Force as a mechanic from 1955 to 1957. He spent the last 12 years of his career with the city Bureau of Water and Waste Water. He retired in 1998. Mr. Cofield enjoyed working on old automobiles and traveling. He was a member of Simmons Memorial Baptist Church, where services were held Thursday.
NEWS
December 5, 2006
Betty T. Gelston, a retired accountant, died of congestive heart failure Nov. 28 at Good Samaritan Hospital. The Jarrettsville resident was 71. Born Betty Lee Tillman in Baltimore and raised in Jacksonville, she graduated from Towson High School in 1953. During a career of more than 30 years, she worked for Stenerson Mahogany Co. in Cockeysville and William Norris Associates in Monkton, where she retired in 2001. She also operated Betty T. Gelston Taxes, an income-tax preparation business.
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