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By ERICA MARCUS and ERICA MARCUS,NEWSDAY | April 5, 2006
What is the difference between heavy cream and whipping cream anyway? The Code of Federal Regulations defines cream as "the liquid milk product high in fat separated from milk" that must contain not less than 18 percent milk fat. Light cream contains between 18 percent and 30 percent milk fat; light whipping cream (also called whipping cream) contains between 30 percent and 36 percent milk fat; heavy cream contains at least 36 percent milk fat. The more fat cream has, the better and easier it will whip.
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ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2013
The folks at Aramark sent over some game-day recipes from M&T Bank Stadium's Executive Chef Joe Bachman . There was one for Maryland crab cakes, another for pit beef sandwiches, but I thou ght you'd want to see the one for Maryland Crab Tots. Headquartered in Philadelphia, Aramark is the exclusive food and beverage partner for M&T Bank Stadium. Here's the recipe for Maryland Crab Tots from M&T Bank Stadium: •    2 pounds tots (any supermarket brand will do)
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ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2013
The folks at Aramark sent over some game-day recipes from M&T Bank Stadium's Executive Chef Joe Bachman . There was one for Maryland crab cakes, another for pit beef sandwiches, but I thou ght you'd want to see the one for Maryland Crab Tots. Headquartered in Philadelphia, Aramark is the exclusive food and beverage partner for M&T Bank Stadium. Here's the recipe for Maryland Crab Tots from M&T Bank Stadium: •    2 pounds tots (any supermarket brand will do)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | May 29, 2012
Creamy orange sherbet for breakfast? And it's spiked with gin? And it's good for you? Langermann's in Canton wants to make your dream come true with their take on a true classic, The Ramos Gin Fizz. There's only one, eye-opening catch: It's made with a healthy, fortifying portion of … egg whites. Yes, the same homogenized egg whites that go into your omelet can also get you drunk. But before you say "gross!" there has to be a reason it's lasted for so long, right? The Ramos Fizz was invented in the late 1800s by H.C. Ramos in New Orleans, but Langermann's managing partner David McGill first tasted the drink while in San Francisco, where the Fizz continues to be a standard brunch offering.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | April 2, 2008
Patricia Coyle of West Palm Beach, Fla., was looking for a recipe for rice pudding that is baked instead of prepared on the stove top like most she has used. The particular recipe she used to have for the baked version was made with heavy whipping cream and she said it was "wonderful!" Dorothy McMann of Perry Hall e-mailed a recipe she got when she visited Williamsburg, Va., some years ago. While this particular recipe calls for whole milk, not heavy cream, there would be no reason why you could not substitute heavy cream if you were not concerned about the calorie count.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 24, 2003
Leave it to the trendy folks in L.A. to come up with a way to reinvent the lusciously decadent White Russian so that even health-conscious party-goers can indulge. Just replace all that cream with soy or skim milk and -voila! - you've got a Skinny White Russian. Francesca Abbracciamento, an event producer in New York City with clients such as Bill Clinton, Conan O'Brien and Kevin Kline, says the West Coast innovation has moved east and made the White Russian a "hot" drink and a perfect centerpiece for a festive gathering.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN | November 24, 2008
Want to save a few calories at Thanksgiving? You can save 9 grams of fat, including 7 grams saturated fat, for every 1/4 cup of whipped cream you dole out on that pie - if you've whipped evaporated milk sweetened with powdered sugar and vanilla instead. You'll also cut 75 calories. You can find instructions on how to use evaporated milk as a whipped cream substitute, and how to make it stay "whipped" up to 30 minutes, at verybestbaking.com. Whipped heavy cream (without sugar) Per 1/4 cup: 100 calories 0 grams protein 10 grams fat 8 grams saturated fat 0 grams carbohydrate 0 grams fiber 40 milligrams cholesterol 10 milligrams sodium Whipped topping with evaporated milk, powdered sugar and vanilla Per 1/4 cup: 25 calories 3 grams protein 1 gram fat 1 gram saturated fat 3 grams carbohydrate 0 grams fiber 5 milligrams cholesterol 15 milligrams sodium Nutritional analysis for heavy cream from package, based on doubled volume when whipped, and for evaporated milk recipe from verybestbaking.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | January 4, 1995
Food has always been one of the best incentives to travel. "World Class Cuisine," a television show on the Discovery Channel, and the title of the companion cookbook by Gail Grecco (Rutledge Hill Press) brings the faraway shores of Greece, Ireland, Portugal, Scotland and England to our doorstep.This production focuses on the elegant cuisines of these foreign lands. While the travelog highlights the recipes, it also shows the fresh-air markets, butchers and the inns or restaurants that are important points along the culinary landscape.
FEATURES
By Renee Hopkins Clark and Renee Hopkins Clark,Contributing Writer | August 8, 1993
Ice cream lovers start cranking. Summer is in full bloom.But the main ingredients in many homemade ice cream recipes -- heavy cream and eggs -- are out of favor because they're high in fat and cholesterol. Then there's the concern about using raw eggs in recipes that aren't cooked before freezing.Suddenly, homemade ice cream is right up there with sunburns on the list of things to watch out for.Egg yolks and cream are the big fat culprits in homemade ice cream. Making substitutions is tricky.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | August 26, 2007
I have always been amazed by the delectable ways the French have for preparing eggs. Last month, while in Paris, I ordered an oeuf en cocotte au crabe and l'estragon - which translates as an egg baked in a dish with crab and tarragon. After my first bite, I was in heaven. All I could think of while savoring this creation was that this recipe would be ideal to serve for brunch or for a special breakfast when we have overnight guests. It was simple, yet sophisticated, and didn't take long to assemble or bake.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN | November 24, 2008
Want to save a few calories at Thanksgiving? You can save 9 grams of fat, including 7 grams saturated fat, for every 1/4 cup of whipped cream you dole out on that pie - if you've whipped evaporated milk sweetened with powdered sugar and vanilla instead. You'll also cut 75 calories. You can find instructions on how to use evaporated milk as a whipped cream substitute, and how to make it stay "whipped" up to 30 minutes, at verybestbaking.com. Whipped heavy cream (without sugar) Per 1/4 cup: 100 calories 0 grams protein 10 grams fat 8 grams saturated fat 0 grams carbohydrate 0 grams fiber 40 milligrams cholesterol 10 milligrams sodium Whipped topping with evaporated milk, powdered sugar and vanilla Per 1/4 cup: 25 calories 3 grams protein 1 gram fat 1 gram saturated fat 3 grams carbohydrate 0 grams fiber 5 milligrams cholesterol 15 milligrams sodium Nutritional analysis for heavy cream from package, based on doubled volume when whipped, and for evaporated milk recipe from verybestbaking.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | June 25, 2008
Ann Mitchell of Pittsfield, Mass., was looking for a recipe for a lemon cake similar to the one that someone brought to a party some years ago. It was made with pieces of angel food cake, lemon pudding and whipped cream layered in a springform pan and chilled. Helen Kimpel, also from Pittsfield, thought she had the recipe. She found it in a magazine a long time ago and it continues to be the dessert most asked for in her family.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | April 2, 2008
Patricia Coyle of West Palm Beach, Fla., was looking for a recipe for rice pudding that is baked instead of prepared on the stove top like most she has used. The particular recipe she used to have for the baked version was made with heavy whipping cream and she said it was "wonderful!" Dorothy McMann of Perry Hall e-mailed a recipe she got when she visited Williamsburg, Va., some years ago. While this particular recipe calls for whole milk, not heavy cream, there would be no reason why you could not substitute heavy cream if you were not concerned about the calorie count.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | August 26, 2007
I have always been amazed by the delectable ways the French have for preparing eggs. Last month, while in Paris, I ordered an oeuf en cocotte au crabe and l'estragon - which translates as an egg baked in a dish with crab and tarragon. After my first bite, I was in heaven. All I could think of while savoring this creation was that this recipe would be ideal to serve for brunch or for a special breakfast when we have overnight guests. It was simple, yet sophisticated, and didn't take long to assemble or bake.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun reporter | March 28, 2007
All the Presidents' Pastries Twenty-five Years in the White House White House Chef By Walter Scheib and Andrew Friedman John Wiley & Sons / 2007 / $24.95 Like Roland Mesnier, Walter Scheib, the executive White House chef for 11 years for the Clintons and the family of George W. Bush, reveals no state secrets, but he is remarkably candid in his description of how he got along (or didn't get along) with his employers. The Maryland native, who was fired early in Bush's second term, hardly hides his disdain for the president's preferred lunch fare - peanut-butter-and-honey sandwiches and grilled cheese made with Kraft Singles.
NEWS
By Kate ShatzkiN and Kate ShatzkiN,[Sun reporter] | December 20, 2006
For a drink that appears only about six weeks of every year, eggnog takes many forms. According to The Dictionary of American Food & Drink by John F. Mariani, the word "nog" is an Old English term for ale, but eggnog was often made in England with Spanish red wine. In America, the book says, spirits took the place of wine, but those have varied, too -- from rum to brandy to bourbon, or a combination. Then there's the more serious safety debate: Should the eggs in the nog be cooked or uncooked?
FEATURES
By Carol Cutler and Carol Cutler,Copley News Service | February 3, 1993
In recent years restaurants have been booked weeks in advance for the evening of Valentine's Day. Forget their crowded dining rooms and have your own celebration at home.Relax and plan a meal that puts the least strain on you. Save the plucking of Cupid's bow for dessert. Chocolate, what else?But not any old chocolate. There is a whole gorgeous bookful of dark inspirations in "Death by Chocolate" by Marcel Desaulniers (Rizzoli). The following recipe makes the perfect, wicked finale to dinner.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Carter and Sylvia Carter,NEWSDAY | June 14, 2000
Edna Lewis, born and raised on a farm in Virginia, is one of my favorite cooks of the last 100 years. Lewis cooked at the fabled Cafe Nicholson in Manhattan, where her chocolate souffles were famous, and at Gage & Tollner in Brooklyn. When I first read Lewis' book, "The Taste of Country Cooking," in 1976, American "regional" cooking had not gained the vogue it was soon to enjoy, and her descriptions of strawberry shortcake and gently fried eggs were glimpses into a past that was fading.
NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE and JOHN FRITZE,SUN REPORTER | July 12, 2006
Magnolias: Authentic Southern Cuisine By Donald Barickman The Boathouse Tales and Recipes From a Southern Kitchen By Douglas W. Bostick and Jason R. Davidson Joggling Board Press / 2006 / $26.95 More history than kitchen guide, this attractive cookbook tells the story of the Carolinas through food. Arresting photographs - only a small portion of which are actually of the finished dishes - are displayed next to stories about how ingredients such as asparagus and okra made their way to the region.
NEWS
By ERICA MARCUS and ERICA MARCUS,NEWSDAY | April 5, 2006
What is the difference between heavy cream and whipping cream anyway? The Code of Federal Regulations defines cream as "the liquid milk product high in fat separated from milk" that must contain not less than 18 percent milk fat. Light cream contains between 18 percent and 30 percent milk fat; light whipping cream (also called whipping cream) contains between 30 percent and 36 percent milk fat; heavy cream contains at least 36 percent milk fat. The more fat cream has, the better and easier it will whip.
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