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NEWS
April 27, 2003
Start enforcing traffic laws on U.S. 50 It was a Tuesday, but it could have been any day of my family's commute from Annapolis to work and day care on the Eastern Shore. A Jaguar tailgates us as we merge onto U.S. 50 from Rowe Boulevard, SUVs roar on by, and there is nary a turn signal in sight as traffic darts from lane to lane. As we pass through the Bay Bridge toll booth, a older model car rockets up the (closed for construction) right lane; heaven forbid he get trapped behind the Ryder truck with the rest of us. This all leads me to ask Governor Ehrlich, state, local and MTA police a simple question: How may people have to die before you get serious about enforcing traffic laws on Route 50?
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FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | June 22, 2007
In Evan Almighty, when the Good Lord (Morgan Freeman) rounds up dozens of species for his latter-day Noah, Evan Baxter, to take into a contemporary ark, he doesn't provide any turkeys. The moviemakers take care of that. Evan Almighty (Universal Pictures) Starring Steve Carell, Morgan Freeman, Lauren Graham, John Goodman. Directed by Tom Shadyac. Rated PG. Time 95 minutes.
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NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 30, 2000
IN THE MIDST of Court TV's coverage of the Ray Lewis murder trial last week, the station broke for a word from their sponsors. "Perry Mason classics," an announcer declared. "Five murders in one incredible Memorial Day Weekend marathon!" Heaven forbid we should go a few days without our quota of entertaining killings. Then, interrupting live coverage a little while later, there was a commercial for "Homicide." Scenes from the famous Baltimore TV show in which art imitates life were interspersed with shots of holiday barbecues in which life imitated a party.
FEATURES
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2004
Ruth Anne Champion quit the hand bell choir this year because she couldn't spare the extra hour on Thursday nights. She turned down a New Year's Eve invitation from dear friends and swore off all television except Sunday afternoon football. The search for timelessness, it turns out, takes an awful lot of time. Champion is helping to pick this year's Newbery Medal winner, a book that will likely become a children's classic. Since the selection process started in January, the 49-year-old Enoch Pratt librarian has read some 400 kids' books.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | June 21, 1992
Tsk, tsk. There goes Bill Clinton, breaking the rules of''notsaposta'' again.''Notsapostas'' are the political taboos too many Democrats live by, according to Rep. Barney Frank, a liberal Massachusetts Democrat.In his book, ''Speaking Frankly: What's Wrong With the Democrats and How To Fix It,'' Mr. Frank defines a ''notsaposta'' as a truth so troubling that members of a political party cannot acknowledge it without suffering a backlash from fellow party members for giving aid and comfort to their enemies.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | February 7, 1995
As usual, President Clinton had no idea what he was getting into.His chances of passing health care reform were better than his chances of settling the baseball strike.It just gets worse and worse for the Prez.First, the Democratic Congress.Then, the Republican Congress.Now, these idiots.Heck, Newt Gingrich and Bob Dole are puppy dogs compared to Bud Selig, Donald Fehr and the rest of the blockheads ruining major-league baseball.Clinton figured he'd do the right thing, rise above the political fray, make everyone happy.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | November 1, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In all the furor from the Republican right wing over the threat that retired Gen. Colin Powell poses to the Gingrich Revolution, and how the righties will see to it that he is never nominated, one fact is conveniently given short shrift: If he chooses to run, it will be the voters, not the heavy thinkers and their disciples, who will decide his fate.The leaders of the religious and ideological right, in their condemnation of Colin Powell for sounding like -- heaven forbid -- a Rockefeller Republican, are thundering their objections over the moderate and limited support the general has recited for abortion rights, affirmative action, gun control and other policies that in their view make him a pariah in the GOP According to Newt.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | December 3, 1996
One victory over Pittsburgh.It electrified Memorial Stadium. It captivated a city of skeptics. It maybe even signaled the turnaround of this staggering franchise.But enough of this touchy-feely celebration.What are the Ravens trying to do, blow a top five draft pick?The sky is falling! Their position is falling!The answer is yes."Winning right now is more important to me than whether we're picking fourth or 10th," said Ozzie Newsome, Ravens director of player personnel.Newsome has to say that -- he's in the business of winning football games.
NEWS
By Molly Ivins | November 15, 2001
AUSTIN, Texas - The fate of Flight 587 is not just a free-standing tragedy, but almost the last thing we needed. Even if the cause remains a mystery, the edginess quotient just shot back up again. It has seemed to me the media have been engaging in a slightly unseemly amount of navel-gazing concerning our nerves, with perhaps excessive media temperature-taking of anxiety levels, crooning over stress on the home front, etc. Americans on the front lines of this war, including the NYFD, are handling their jobs without swooning, and from my own travels around the country, it seems to me most of the rest of us are managing to comport ourselves with reason and dignity, whatever our anxiety levels.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | December 28, 1997
I TURNED 13 on Dec. 29, 1964. I was still smarting from the hurt of my beloved Baltimore Colts losing the NFL championship game two days earlier to the Cleveland Browns in a 27-0 rout.I don't remember what I did that day. I may have gone out and played some touch football on the playgrounds of the Murphy Homes high-rise on Argyle Avenue with my buddies: Marvin Burrell, my classmate at Harlem Park Junior High; his older brother Nat; and Lehr Sorden and Dennis Knox, two more of my classmates.
NEWS
April 27, 2003
Start enforcing traffic laws on U.S. 50 It was a Tuesday, but it could have been any day of my family's commute from Annapolis to work and day care on the Eastern Shore. A Jaguar tailgates us as we merge onto U.S. 50 from Rowe Boulevard, SUVs roar on by, and there is nary a turn signal in sight as traffic darts from lane to lane. As we pass through the Bay Bridge toll booth, a older model car rockets up the (closed for construction) right lane; heaven forbid he get trapped behind the Ryder truck with the rest of us. This all leads me to ask Governor Ehrlich, state, local and MTA police a simple question: How may people have to die before you get serious about enforcing traffic laws on Route 50?
NEWS
By Molly Ivins | November 15, 2001
AUSTIN, Texas - The fate of Flight 587 is not just a free-standing tragedy, but almost the last thing we needed. Even if the cause remains a mystery, the edginess quotient just shot back up again. It has seemed to me the media have been engaging in a slightly unseemly amount of navel-gazing concerning our nerves, with perhaps excessive media temperature-taking of anxiety levels, crooning over stress on the home front, etc. Americans on the front lines of this war, including the NYFD, are handling their jobs without swooning, and from my own travels around the country, it seems to me most of the rest of us are managing to comport ourselves with reason and dignity, whatever our anxiety levels.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 30, 2000
IN THE MIDST of Court TV's coverage of the Ray Lewis murder trial last week, the station broke for a word from their sponsors. "Perry Mason classics," an announcer declared. "Five murders in one incredible Memorial Day Weekend marathon!" Heaven forbid we should go a few days without our quota of entertaining killings. Then, interrupting live coverage a little while later, there was a commercial for "Homicide." Scenes from the famous Baltimore TV show in which art imitates life were interspersed with shots of holiday barbecues in which life imitated a party.
NEWS
By Nora Zamichow and Nora Zamichow,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 5, 1999
Thirteen-year-old Katie Riggs is not allowed to wear mascara and isn't really going on dates, but she doesn't think twice about sashaying through the mall with -- heaven forbid -- her bra straps exposed.Grandma, cover your eyes: Bra straps are cool. The undergarment whose absence once symbolized rebellion has returned in a most visible way.After cropping up in New York and Los Angeles several years ago, the exposed strap has become a national phenomenon among under-30 women, fashion experts say. It's a look that young people variously praise as comfortable and feminine, in-your-face cute and alluring.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | December 28, 1997
I TURNED 13 on Dec. 29, 1964. I was still smarting from the hurt of my beloved Baltimore Colts losing the NFL championship game two days earlier to the Cleveland Browns in a 27-0 rout.I don't remember what I did that day. I may have gone out and played some touch football on the playgrounds of the Murphy Homes high-rise on Argyle Avenue with my buddies: Marvin Burrell, my classmate at Harlem Park Junior High; his older brother Nat; and Lehr Sorden and Dennis Knox, two more of my classmates.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | December 3, 1996
One victory over Pittsburgh.It electrified Memorial Stadium. It captivated a city of skeptics. It maybe even signaled the turnaround of this staggering franchise.But enough of this touchy-feely celebration.What are the Ravens trying to do, blow a top five draft pick?The sky is falling! Their position is falling!The answer is yes."Winning right now is more important to me than whether we're picking fourth or 10th," said Ozzie Newsome, Ravens director of player personnel.Newsome has to say that -- he's in the business of winning football games.
FEATURES
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2004
Ruth Anne Champion quit the hand bell choir this year because she couldn't spare the extra hour on Thursday nights. She turned down a New Year's Eve invitation from dear friends and swore off all television except Sunday afternoon football. The search for timelessness, it turns out, takes an awful lot of time. Champion is helping to pick this year's Newbery Medal winner, a book that will likely become a children's classic. Since the selection process started in January, the 49-year-old Enoch Pratt librarian has read some 400 kids' books.
NEWS
By Nora Zamichow and Nora Zamichow,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 5, 1999
Thirteen-year-old Katie Riggs is not allowed to wear mascara and isn't really going on dates, but she doesn't think twice about sashaying through the mall with -- heaven forbid -- her bra straps exposed.Grandma, cover your eyes: Bra straps are cool. The undergarment whose absence once symbolized rebellion has returned in a most visible way.After cropping up in New York and Los Angeles several years ago, the exposed strap has become a national phenomenon among under-30 women, fashion experts say. It's a look that young people variously praise as comfortable and feminine, in-your-face cute and alluring.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | November 1, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In all the furor from the Republican right wing over the threat that retired Gen. Colin Powell poses to the Gingrich Revolution, and how the righties will see to it that he is never nominated, one fact is conveniently given short shrift: If he chooses to run, it will be the voters, not the heavy thinkers and their disciples, who will decide his fate.The leaders of the religious and ideological right, in their condemnation of Colin Powell for sounding like -- heaven forbid -- a Rockefeller Republican, are thundering their objections over the moderate and limited support the general has recited for abortion rights, affirmative action, gun control and other policies that in their view make him a pariah in the GOP According to Newt.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | February 7, 1995
As usual, President Clinton had no idea what he was getting into.His chances of passing health care reform were better than his chances of settling the baseball strike.It just gets worse and worse for the Prez.First, the Democratic Congress.Then, the Republican Congress.Now, these idiots.Heck, Newt Gingrich and Bob Dole are puppy dogs compared to Bud Selig, Donald Fehr and the rest of the blockheads ruining major-league baseball.Clinton figured he'd do the right thing, rise above the political fray, make everyone happy.
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