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HEALTH
May 27, 2010
With Memorial Day approaching and school soon reaching an end, it's a good time to brush up on summer health and safety. Dr. Bill Zirkin of the Greater Baltimore Medical Center's emergency department talks about common summer issues and how to avoid them. Question: What are the warning signs of heatstroke or other heat-related illness? What are the best ways to avoid it? Answer: Heat-related illnesses, including heatstroke, which is the most severe condition caused by overheating, are caused by the body's inability to cool itself.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2012
No parent would ever intentionally leave a child in a steaming car on a hot summer day. But it happens every year to astounded parents. Dr. Melissa Sparrow, clinical director of pediatric inpatient and emergency services at Greater Baltimore Medical Center, talks about what can happen when babies are left in hot cars and how to prevent it. How common a problem is kids getting left in hot cars? Kids getting left in cars is fairly common, but the incidence of death from being left in a hot car is the number we can clearly articulate.
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NEWS
March 18, 2010
A Thurmont man whose Rottweiler died from heatstroke after being left chained to a stake in the July sun was sentenced Tuesday to 90 days in jail. Frederick County District Judge Janice Ambrose also ordered 24-year-old Michael Flemming to do 50 hours of community service, preferably at an animal shelter. - Associated Press
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | June 21, 2012
Baltimore has already experience its first two Code Red Heat Alert days, and the weekend forecast is for more high temperatures. Here are some reminders from Johns Hopkins emergency physicians about how to stay healthy in extreme heat: +Drink a lot of water, about 8 ounces per hour, and avoid restrictive clothing that promotes sweating. Dehydration can lead to muscle spasms, seizures and coma. +Avoid long periods in the heat by staying inside in air conditioning as much as possible.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2003
A history of heat-related illness by Steve Bechler - disclosed this week by his parents - made the Orioles pitching prospect a prime candidate for the heatstroke that killed him, according to a leading researcher. W. Larry Kenney said studies - many conducted by the Israeli military - show a pattern of heat illness in the same patient. Some experts theorize that people are genetically predisposed to be sensitive to heat, but others believe the first incident may impair a person's ability to withstand it, said Kenney, president-elect of the American College of Sports Medicine.
NEWS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | February 18, 2003
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - Orioles pitching prospect Steve Bechler, who made his major- league debut five months ago at Camden Yards, died yesterday morning of multisystem organ failure caused by heatstroke. He was 23. Bechler was rushed to North Ridge Medical Center toward the end of Sunday's spring training workout after becoming pale and disoriented on one of the back fields of the Orioles complex. He was attempting to complete his final conditioning run. His body temperature later peaked at 108 degrees, a team physician said.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2005
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - While the eyes of America were on six of baseball's biggest names discussing steroids Thursday, two Orioles pitchers were at a South Florida hearing involving another banned substance. Rick Bauer and Matt Riley appeared at deposition hearings Thursday as part of the ongoing third-party lawsuit involving the Orioles and the 2003 heatstroke death of pitcher Steve Bechler. They are likely the last among a group of at least a dozen Orioles players and staff to be called for a deposition in the past two months, according to Pete Murphy, an attorney in the Florida-based Kubicki, Draper law firm that is representing the Orioles.
NEWS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2001
The Minnesota Vikings' Korey Stringer died yesterday of a suspected heatstroke, becoming the National Football League's first football-related fatality in 22 years and highlighting concerns about summer workouts in the sport. Stringer, 27, a 335-pound offensive tackle, died shortly before 2 a.m. at Immanuel St. Joseph's-Mayo Health System in Mankato, Minn., where he was taken Tuesday after a morning practice on the team's second day of training camp. "This has been a very difficult day. We have lost a brother, a teammate and a friend," Vikings coach Dennis Green said in a news conference yesterday.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2005
Yesterday morning, track veterinarian Forrest Peacock was checking horses at Pimlico Race Course, making sure they were in condition to race and withstand the blazing heat. In 40 years, he said, he has never seen a horse expire from a direct heat-related problem, but he has seen many cases of heatstroke. "Oh, God, yes, we see heatstroke," he said. "Some horses don't sweat, and sometimes you'll see one that seems to be a chronic repeater. And there are times when they've been in the throes of heatstroke and bumped their heads and died."
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2003
The company that makes the controversial ephedra-based diet supplement Xenadrine RFA-1 has filed a motion to include the Orioles as a third-party defendant in the $600 million lawsuit brought by the widow of Orioles pitcher Steve Bechler. Nutraquest, formerly known as Cytodyne Industries, hopes to establish that the team was responsible for Bechler's death from heatstroke, though Broward County (Fla.) medical examiner Joshua Perper pointed to his ingestion of three Xenadrine capsules before a spring training workout as one of the major contributing factors in the tragedy.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | May 24, 2012
As Memorial Day approaches and the temperatures rise, some state health officials are reminding residents to take care of themselves and their children and neighbors. The state is activating its heat emergency website, dhmh.maryland.gov/extremeheat , which has information about preventing death and illness. Heat advisories will be issued when it feels like it's at least 105 degrees after heat and humidity are factored. Health officials say at this heat level heat stroke and exhaustion are common.
HEALTH
May 27, 2010
With Memorial Day approaching and school soon reaching an end, it's a good time to brush up on summer health and safety. Dr. Bill Zirkin of the Greater Baltimore Medical Center's emergency department talks about common summer issues and how to avoid them. Question: What are the warning signs of heatstroke or other heat-related illness? What are the best ways to avoid it? Answer: Heat-related illnesses, including heatstroke, which is the most severe condition caused by overheating, are caused by the body's inability to cool itself.
NEWS
March 18, 2010
A Thurmont man whose Rottweiler died from heatstroke after being left chained to a stake in the July sun was sentenced Tuesday to 90 days in jail. Frederick County District Judge Janice Ambrose also ordered 24-year-old Michael Flemming to do 50 hours of community service, preferably at an animal shelter. - Associated Press
NEWS
November 26, 2009
The parents of a 23-month-old Howard County girl who died of heat stroke after being left in the family car for several hours on June 25 will not be prosecuted, Howard County State's Attorney Dario Broccolino said Wednesday. Broccolino said that his office had recommended that the parents be charged with involuntary manslaughter and reckless endangerment, but that the grand jury declined to indict the Ellicott City couple, whose names have not been made public. According to police, "a change in routine" led to some miscommunication between the parents about who was taking the toddler to day care.
TRAVEL
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | July 5, 2009
The water's lapping at your freshly manicured toes. The sun's shining down on your back and your Blackberry is most definitely turned off. It's a glorious beach moment. But sun seekers beware: A dazzling day at the shore can be the perfect summer escape, but don't let the relaxation put you off your guard. When it comes to sun, there can be too much of a good thing. Heat exhaustion and sunburn are not just minor annoyances; they can be harmful. Heat-related illness, ranging from cramps to life-threatening heatstroke, happens when the body struggles to cool itself.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | August 9, 2007
During the next month, thousands of high school and college football teams will get ready for fall by practicing in torrid conditions where heatstroke is a constant danger. That has some trainers and doctors worried about some thermometers that, in their view, sacrifice accuracy for convenience. The devices use infrared light to scan heat radiation in the ear or on the forehead. The infrared thermometers have produced lower readings in athletic settings -- or in lab tests meant to simulate them -- than rectal thermometers or other devices.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | June 21, 2012
Baltimore has already experience its first two Code Red Heat Alert days, and the weekend forecast is for more high temperatures. Here are some reminders from Johns Hopkins emergency physicians about how to stay healthy in extreme heat: +Drink a lot of water, about 8 ounces per hour, and avoid restrictive clothing that promotes sweating. Dehydration can lead to muscle spasms, seizures and coma. +Avoid long periods in the heat by staying inside in air conditioning as much as possible.
SPORTS
By SANDRA McKEE and SANDRA McKEE,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2005
Yesterday morning, track veterinarian Forrest Peacock was checking horses at Pimlico Race Course, making sure they were in condition to race and withstand the blazing heat. In 40 years, he said, he has never seen a horse expire from a direct heat-related problem, but he has seen many cases of heatstroke. "Oh, God, yes, we see heatstroke," he said. "Some horses don't sweat, and sometimes you'll see one that seems to be a chronic repeater. And there are times when they've been in the throes of heatstroke and bumped their heads and died."
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