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By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | January 19, 1994
Toilet paper? Check. Eggs? Check.But what about heating oil? Or something to keep the pipes from bursting? Or enough salt to keep the mail carrier from becoming airborne?Baltimore has reacted to this week's cold snap as it usually does: by stocking up and digging in -- at the last minute."It's like grocery stores with the toilet paper," said Richard Phelps, president of Carroll Independent Fuel Co. of Baltimore, who pressed two of his cousins who work in the company's marketing department into driving delivery trucks to meet demand.
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NEWS
January 14, 2014
Inequality is replacing the American dream, because the U.S. economy - thanks to Washington's mismanagement - is underperforming. America still produces one fifth of the world's goods and services, but it accounts for a much smaller share of global growth. Many U.S. products are no longer the best in class. Consequently, the economy can't adequately employ many of its college graduates, and wages are stagnant or falling for ordinary folks. America still has great strengths. High labor productivity, coupled with rising wages in Asia, make American workers a good value for global investors.
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BUSINESS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | September 10, 1990
The impact of the Persian Gulf crisis on heating oil supplies and prices this winter is impossible to predict, but experts say they have seen little evidence so far to suggest a repeat of last December when a record cold snap led to shortages and drastic price increases.After Iraq invaded Kuwait last month, prices for heating oil jumped to $1 a gallon. However, the supply has been steady. The Bush administration fears a shortage could develop late in the year, but experts say this will depend upon whether other oil-producing nations step up their output sufficiently to compensate for the loss of embargoed oil.In the back of everyone's mind: last year's disastrous December when prices shot up by an average of 45 cents a gallon, to $1.40 and higher, along the East Coast.
NEWS
January 29, 2013
With the revised route for the Keystone XL pipeline having last week won approval from Nebraska's Republican governor, the geology of North America's most controversial energy project is clear: It has landed President Barack Obama between a rock and a hard place. Having campaigned for an "all of the above" energy policy but also having announced that addressing climate change will be a top priority during his second term, President Obama must choose between enabling TransCanada's petroleum exports and preventing what climatologists fear will quickly provide a huge and disastrous new boost in greenhouse gases.
NEWS
August 28, 2003
Howard Louis Staley, a retired heating oil salesman who was active in the McDonogh School alumni association, died Sunday of complications of pneumonia at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 84 and lived in Timonium before moving to the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville 12 years ago. Born and raised in Baltimore, he was a 1937 McDonogh graduate and attended the Johns Hopkins University. During World War II, he served in the Navy on the destroyer escort USS Farquhar in the South Pacific.
NEWS
September 18, 1990
Services for Robert E. Horney, founder of a heating oil company and an ice cream company, will be held at 11 a.m. today at the Bruzdzinski Funeral Home, 1407 Eastern Ave., Essex.Mr. Horney, who was 86, died Saturday after a heart attack at his home on Wye Road in Middle River.In 1932, he started the Quality Oil Co., which makes heating oil deliveries in the Essex-Middle River area. He operated the company until he retired about 20 years ago.He also started the Liberty Bell Ice Cream Co., which sold confections from trucks in neighborhoods in the same area for about 20 years in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s.
NEWS
By Michael Gordon | April 3, 2001
PHILADELPHIA -- At the close of another heating season, I am disturbed by heating oil supplier practices around the country that suggest suppliers don't believe that consumers are smart. The heating oil market operates with suppliers driving a truck to an oil terminal and buying the oil for delivery to residential users, with the cost marked up to the consumer. Residential oil prices today range from $1.10 to $1.75 per gallon. They reflect a mark-up to the consumer of 35 cents to $1 a gallon.
BUSINESS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | November 27, 1990
It's been a while since the Hechinger's hardware and lumber store at Northwood Shopping Center sold grass seed in November.But, over the weekend, a customer came in asking for it and Glen Stone, the store manager, scrounged around and found a 25-pound bag in storage. "He just wouldn't get out of here without it," Stone said.With temperatures expected to flirt with records today and tomorrow, businesses all over the city are adjusting to spring in November. Heating oil sales, usually gushing this time of year, have slowed to a dribble and prices may drop as a result.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Sun Columnist | April 24, 2007
Bonnie Chandler's blood is still boiling about the partnership of former Congressman Joe Kennedy and Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez supplying free heating oil to poor Americans this past winter. Her beef has nothing to do with politics, although some critics have called the free fuel offer a publicity stunt by Kennedy and an attempt by Chavez to embarrass the U.S. government and the man he calls the "devil," President Bush. The 63-year-old Harford County resident also has no gripe against philanthropy: She is, after all, one of those who needs help to heat her home.
NEWS
April 19, 2004
An Eastern Petroleum tanker overturned on a steep curve in Gambrills yesterday morning, spilling about 1,000 gallons of heating oil, according to Anne Arundel County officials. The tanker driver told investigators that the truck's brakes malfunctioned and that he was unable to negotiate the tight curve on Dicus Mill Road, said Anne Arundel police Sgt. William Collier. The truck overturned about 8:30 a.m., spilling fuel on the bank and down the hill, Collier said.
NEWS
April 3, 2012
We have been hearing claims by our federal government that there is low to no inflation in this economy. The Federal Reserve continues an "easy money" policy, cranking up the printing presses at the U.S. Mint when the government needs more money to operate than it collects in taxes. And long term interest rates are the lowest in recent history. And deficits are at all time high levels. Yet gasoline and heating oil are up 40 percent since last year (and we can't blame the oil companies for the price of oil products)
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | June 25, 2009
Matthew Simmons, Texas author and investment banker and the guy who bet oil will hit $200 a barrel next year, feels pretty good. Oil has doubled to $70 recently as the economy shows signs of life, and "prices do seem poised for the next leg up," he says on the phone. "By sometime a year or two from now, we'll look back and say, yeah, prices were really cheap." Perhaps the leading proponent of the idea that oil is running out, Simmons probably won't win his bet, made with New York Times columnist John Tierney.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | May 25, 2009
The thick, milky white liquid looks like Elmer's glue, though it's greasy to the touch. It has a sweet, alcohol smell. It's not your father's heating oil, to be sure. But it will do the same job, says Cary J. Claiborne, and a lot more cleanly. Claiborne is president and chief executive officer of New Generation Biofuels, a Florida-based startup that's producing fuel from vegetable and soybean oil at a small production plant it set up this year in southern Baltimore. "It's very biodegradable," Claiborne says as he dips his finger into a small bottle holding a sample of a recent batch.
BUSINESS
By From Sun staff and news services | January 8, 2009
Citgo, the Venezuelan government's U.S.-based oil subsidiary, reversed course yesterday and said it will continue shipments of heating oil to poor families in the United States, including in Maryland. Former U.S. Rep. Joseph P. Kennedy II, head of Citizens Energy, the Boston-based nonprofit that distributes the fuel, said Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez intervened directly. The announcement came two days after Kennedy said Citgo was suspending fuel assistance, with the company noting falling oil prices and the world economic crisis.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | January 6, 2009
Maryland residents who were hoping to receive 100 gallons of free heating oil through a program sponsored by the Venezuelan government won't receive that benefit this year. Because of dropping fuel prices and the global economic crisis, Citgo, Venezuela's Texas-based oil subsidiary, has indefinitely suspended social programs including support for a heating oil subsidy for the poor. Boston-based Citizens Energy, a nonprofit that administered the program with Citgo, announced the news yesterday.
NEWS
August 10, 2008
Maryland families, already struggling with high gasoline and food costs, will face a major new energy challenge within a few months. The price of home heating oil, used by nearly 38,000 low-income families here, is likely to be more than a third higher than it was last winter. Right now, it's more than twice the $2-a-gallon price of three years ago. The increased cost compounds the problems of many low- and moderate-income families who are struggling to pay overdue utility bills and see no relief in sight.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 2, 1998
Vandals opened a valve at an outdoor pump house in Harford County on Wednesday night, spilling home heating oil onto an oil company's property and into a stream, police said yesterday.Investigators said it could take up to two days to clean the site at Heaps Oil Co. in the 4600 block of Green Marble Road in Whiteford.Police said they did not know how much oil from the 6,500-gallon tank had spilled into the stream. They said an unknown amount had been stolen. The oil company's owner found the spill about 9 LTC a.m. yesterday and notified the county Sheriff's Department and the Maryland Department of the Environment, police said.
BUSINESS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | September 26, 1990
Most of the customers filling up at the Rosedale Texaco are the same, polite, reasonable people they were before the specter of Saddam Hussein invaded their gas tanks.But, with increasing frequency, a customer marches sternly to the cashier's window and throws the money down in a silent rage."They look at you like you are crazy," says owner Edward Unitas. A 20-year veteran of the business, and a survivor of two previous energy crises, Unitas says he's never seen anything like this.Gasoline prices in Maryland are at all-time highs and experts are talking about $1.60 and $1.85 in the future.
NEWS
April 27, 2008
America is addicted to oil. So when the price of oil doubles and then threatens to double again, there are large economic and social consequences. Feeling our pain, politicians want to pressure OPEC to increase production or tap the nation's strategic petroleum reserve. Such cures are unlikely to be effective. The world's oil supply is limited, global demand is growing fast and it's time for Congress to impose a much more efficient use of oil through tougher fuel economy and tighter building standards.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | November 25, 2007
Pre-winter energy update: The cost of heating oil is way up, along with the cost of crude and gasoline. The cost of natural gas is comparatively lower. And the wholesale cost of electricity is down, too, though it won't do you any good. BGE has locked into (higher) winter prices already, and, unlike last year, nobody is offering to undercut BGE's standard price and pass along the favorable wholesale prices. This year, those who heat their homes with natural gas are likely to be better off than people depending on oil furnaces or electric heat.
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