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By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2012
Customers ofBaltimore Gas and Electric Co.can expect to pay $100 to $200 less to heat their homes this winter if the warmer-than-normal weather continues, the utility said Wednesday. BGE expects a 16 percent decrease in heating bills because of warmer temperatures and a drop in commodity prices for natural gas and electricity. Customers' bills will vary depending upon a home's energy efficiency and the condition of the furnace or heat pump, BGE said. A typical residential gas customer should have a total gas bill of about $486 for the Nov. 1 through March 31 period, or about $100 less than the same period a year ago. Part of that is due to natural gas commodity prices decreasing to 58 cents per therm compared to 62 cents per therm last winter.
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NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2012
Customers ofBaltimore Gas and Electric Co.can expect to pay $100 to $200 less to heat their homes this winter if the warmer-than-normal weather continues, the utility said Wednesday. BGE expects a 16 percent decrease in heating bills because of warmer temperatures and a drop in commodity prices for natural gas and electricity. Customers' bills will vary depending upon a home's energy efficiency and the condition of the furnace or heat pump, BGE said. A typical residential gas customer should have a total gas bill of about $486 for the Nov. 1 through March 31 period, or about $100 less than the same period a year ago. Part of that is due to natural gas commodity prices decreasing to 58 cents per therm compared to 62 cents per therm last winter.
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NEWS
December 27, 1990
Janet Farral and Mary Baldridge of the Anne Arundel County Fuel Fund, along with Orioles' second-baseman Bill Ripkin, are promoting the Fuel Fund of Central Maryland's Green Envelope campaign. County residents can find the special envelopes in this month's Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. bills.Contributions will help needy county residents with their home heating bills this winter. Information: 234-7433.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | July 12, 2010
About 11,000 dead people in seven states, including Maryland, have gotten government heating aid over the past year or so, according to congressional investigators. They say that the grave is cold, but it's illegal to receive energy subsidies when your address is six feet under. Plenty of other Marylanders may also be ripping off the $5 billion Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program, to judge from last month's report from the U.S. Government Accountability Office. In the seven states, the GAO found households receiving more than $100 million in benefits even though recipients weren't sufficiently documented on state records as being eligible.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,Sun Staff Writer | December 23, 1994
A cut in federal funding means low-income Howard County residents will get less help with their heating costs this winter than they did last winter.Howard lost about 14 percent of its budget for fuel assistance when the federal government cut funding for the Maryland Energy Assistance Program (MEAP) by $750,000 in September. The average one-time benefit in this county will drop from $295 to $240."It's only going to get worse," said Sandra Brown, state director of MEAP. "Cutting social programs is the thing to do now. The bottom line is people will have to come up with some of it themselves."
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | January 21, 2001
There must be some variation of Murphy's Law that goes: Skyrocketing oil and gas prices will cause the average temperature of a winter's day to drop 10 degrees. It's cold outside and heating bills are soaring, so a few money-saving measures are definitely in order. What should we do? As Tim Jahnigen of Baltimore Gas & Electric puts it, "Lifestyle choices will determine how much you pay at the end of the month." Start with the easy ones. No-brainers: Put on a sweater and turn the thermostat down.
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing writer | October 13, 1991
As energy prices continue to rise, Michael, a 38-year-old Carroll County mason, awaits word on his application for a state grant to help pay his home heating costs."
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2004
The weather outside may be frightful, but heating bills aren't giving Maryland residents the chills - yet. Apart from a couple of severe cold snaps, the 2003-2004 heating season has been remarkably warm. Baltimore's cumulative total of degree days - an arcane measurement used by fuel companies and weather forecasters to assess the costs of cold weather - is well below normal, and that's good news for consumers. It means that even with higher prices for fuel oil and natural gas on the wholesale market, consumption is down, so heating bills haven't been soaring.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2003
First, the bad news: Expect to pay higher prices for natural gas this winter. Now, the good news: The gas company is expecting a milder winter than last year's. Combine those two pieces of information and it could spell relief for weary consumers in the Baltimore region who watched their heating bills double and triple last winter when extremely cold temperatures drove up demand and low storage levels sent prices soaring. But that doesn't mean heating bills will drop drastically. It just means that if nature cooperates, you'll be fortunate enough to pay the same amount to keep warm this winter as you did last year.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | July 21, 1996
Southwest Visions Inc., a nonprofit agency that has been working 12 years to bring housing to low-income residents in Southwest Baltimore, has a new ally in its fight for affordable homes: the sun.Solar heat and other energy-saving devices are being installed in a city rowhouse that the agency is renovating to sell to a low-income family later this summer. The aim is to lower energy costs and make it easier to own the home, says Thomas A. Brinker, program director at Southwest Visions."This is a model for how we'd like to do housing in the future," he says while standing in the gutted 19th century house at 1321 W. Pratt St.In the past, Southwest Visions focused primarily on providing affordable rental units.
NEWS
February 21, 2010
The Maryland Energy Assistance Program is accepting applications for the heating season. Those needing assistance should call the Anne Arundel County Department of Aging and Disabilities at 410-222-4257 and speak with an information specialist, who can mail out an application form.
NEWS
April 19, 2009
The General Assembly's failure to move forward with the re-regulation of the electric industry this year is surely not the final word on the subject. It certainly doesn't indicate any sudden embrace of deregulation, the dubious enterprise that proved to be. More likely it reflects the challenge of getting lawmakers to seriously address a topic that is both substantively complex and fraught with high-voltage politics. Gov. Martin O'Malley didn't help matters much by submitting the legislation so late in the session.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | April 15, 2008
Let's be clear here: We're not talking about people who foolishly bought more house than they could afford, or took out a subprime mortgage that they didn't understand or gambled that an adjustable rate loan that started low wouldn't ever, duh, adjust upward. We're not talking about any of those self-inflicted, foreclosure-inducing stab wounds that have contributed to the current housing crisis. We're talking about someone's house possibly being seized over what started out as a $173 water bill.
BUSINESS
By Tim Carter and Tim Carter,Tribune Media Services | February 17, 2008
My home heating bills are going up fast. What is the best way to save money on home heating? Some say it is better just to leave the thermostat at the same temperature all the time, as it costs so much to bring a cold house up to temperature. Others say to use a programmable thermostat. Still others feel you should set the thermostat down to 50 degrees at night and while at work. What do you suggest? There is no one-size-fits-all solution for keeping your home comfortable cheaply. If you want to save a significant amount on your heating bills, you could set back the thermostat to 60 degrees Fahrenheit for the entire heating season while you're awake, and then to 50 degrees when you are asleep.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1995
Concerned about federal cuts to energy assistance programs, Howard County and other counties in Central Maryland will hold rallies tomorrow to collect money for a program that helps low-income residents pay heating bills.The Community Action Council of Howard County, a nonprofit agency, will hold its rally at 11 a.m. tomorrow outside the county office building in Gateway Industrial Park. As a symbol of the fund-raising drive, gloves will be given away at the rally.Money raised during the rallies will go to the Fuel Fund of Central Maryland, part of a national nonprofit effort to help the needy.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | January 20, 1994
Heating bills go up in winter, but a fixed income does not rise proportionately.That's why federal and state agencies have money to help low-income households pay their heating bills, said Kelly Parrish, assistant director of Human Services Programs of Carroll County Inc.The philosophy of the Maryland Energy Assistance Program is to keep families from having to choose between paying for heat and other essentials, such as food or health care, Ms. Parrish said."I...
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