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NEWS
By Scott Dance | July 13, 2012
Severe weather has quieted, so there's not much else for meteorologists to chat about but a few guessing games. And AccuWeather severe weather blogger Henry Margusity's hunch is that there is a link between this month's heat waves across the U.S. and the climatic phenomenon known as the North Atlantic Oscillation. The NAO, which measures the atmospheric pressure difference between the typical low pressure system near Iceland and high pressure south of the Azores, hit its lowest point since 1950 in June, an AccuWeather reader pointed out to Margusity.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance | July 12, 2012
This week was forecast as a return to the 80s, but there ended up being a one-day reprieve before what looks like another extended return to the 90s. The forecast doesn't approach 100 degrees like the deadly heat wave that ended Sunday. But it calls for a continued simmering of the region. The National Weather Service is calling for highs in the low 90s through the weekend and into early next week, at least through Tuesday. Monday, with a high of 86 at BWI, is the only day so far this month not to break 90. Baltimoreans may have gotten used to this sort of heat by now, though it is sure to be above-average.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | July 9, 2012
The weather pattern that brought heat that lingered around 100 degrees has passed, but it won't be forgotten soon. It brought some notable weather extremes and set at least three records in the Baltimore area. Here's a review of the past two weeks or so, by the numbers: 67 : Wind speed, in mph, at BWI Marshall Airport during the derecho storm June 29. 675,000 : Power outages the storm caused in the territory Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. serves; later, heat and smaller storms raised the number as high as 748,000 outages within a week.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | July 7, 2012
An excessive heat warning is in effect for central and southern Maryland and part of the Eastern Shore from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday. High temperatures could reach a record-breaking 104 degrees, according to the National Weather Service, with heat index values up to 110 degrees. A high of 101 degrees from a heat wave in 2010 is the record for BWI Marshall Airport on July 7. That means a high risk of heat exhaustion or other heat-related illnesses, the weather service warns.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 3, 2012
WEATHER The National Weather Service is calling for Tuesday mostly sunny in the Baltimore area, with a high near 94 and south winds around 6 miles per hour. Forecasters warn that isolated thunderstorms are possible Tuesday afternoon and evening and that a few thunderstorms may produce large hail and damaging winds.Tuesday night is expected to be mostly cloudy, with a low around 80, with a 30 percent chance of precipitation. Wednesday (July 4) is expected to be partly sunny, with a high near 97 and a 40 percent chance of precipitation.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 29, 2012
With temperatures predicted to top 100 degrees today and stay in the high 90s into next week, air-quality forecasters are warning that smog across much of Maryland likely will reach unhealthful levels for children, older adults and anyone with breathing or heart problems. Smog, or ground-level ozone pollution, is expected to hit "Code Orange" levels through Sunday in the Baltimore metropolitan area, according to Clean Air Partners , which publishes air-quality forecasts prepared for the Maryland Department of the Environment and the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2012
A second wave of summer heat is bearing down on Baltimore — one that could last a week or more. A high of 90 degrees Wednesday at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport marked the start of what could be at least a seven-day stretch with highs in the 90s or above. The National Weather Service is predicting temperatures in the upper 90s through at least Tuesday, but other forecasters expect the heat to linger much longer. That has health officials ready to open cooling centers and Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. expecting a surge in power use. The heat wave could be the longest in a year, but would have to last for weeks to set a record.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | June 26, 2012
BWI Marshall Airport hit a low of 58 degrees early Tuesday morning, its coldest since June 18 and the heat wave that followed. But the heat is expected to return to start the weekend. A high pressure system is expected to settle over the region much like one did last week. Hot, humid weather will settle in Thursday. Friday and Saturday, temperatures are forecast in the upper 90s. Before we get there, weather is expected to be pleasant with highs in the lower 80s and breezy winds Tuesday and Wednesday.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | June 22, 2012
Update: A severe thunderstorm has been detected near New Carrolton, according to an 8:04 p.m. report from the National Weather Service. The storm is moving east at 25 miles per hour and capable of producing quarter-sized hail and 70-mile-per-hour winds. "This is a dangerous storm. If you are in its path, prepare immediately for damaging wind gusts, large hail and frequent cloud to ground lightning. Move indoors to a sturdy building and stay away from windows," the NWS warns. A severe thunderstorm watch has been issued for the Baltimore area through 9 p.m. Friday, the storms marking the end of a three-day stretch of heat above 90 degrees.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | June 21, 2012
A heat advisory from the National Weather Service continues into Thursday, lasting through 10 p.m. And the latest forecasts show the heat may not break until the weekend. Temperatures were rising quickly Thursday morning, surpassing the 90-degree mark before 10 a.m. at BWI Marshall Airport. The temperature was 92 with a heat index of 96 as of 10 a.m., three degrees ahead of Wednesday's climb. The high Wednesday was 98 degrees. The chance for one weather record was dashed early Thursday, when BWI hit an overnight low of 75 degrees.
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