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Heat Stroke

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By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Autopsy results showing that Morgan State University football player Marquese Meadow died of heat stroke have prompted his mother to question whether coaches and trainers monitored the heat at practice or gave players enough water breaks. Meadow, an 18-year-old freshman from Washington, D.C., died early Sunday after being hospitalized for two weeks. School officials said he became disoriented after an Aug. 10 football practice. His death has been ruled accidental, said Bruce Goldfarb, spokesman for the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner.
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SPORTS
Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
The Aug. 10 workout at which Morgan State football player Marquese Meadow fell ill was a one-hour, non-contact session geared toward conditioning, a university spokesman said Wednesday. Meadow, a freshman on the Bears' football team, died Sunday of heat stroke after spending two weeks in the hospital. Morgan State spokesman Clint Coleman reiterated Wednesday that the school believes all proper procedures were followed by the coaching staff and athletic trainers. He said Meadow was attended to by a trainer after becoming disoriented toward the end of the Aug. 10 session, during which players were not in pads.
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FEATURES
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,Sun Reporter | July 12, 2007
Summer means heat, humidity and lots of sweating. It's uncomfortable, but the sweat pouring down your face is actually protecting you from heat stroke and possibly saving your life. Heat stroke, which can progress rapidly, results from your body's inability to cool itself in extremely hot conditions. A lack of fluids can also contribute to its onset. Dr. Bill Zirkin, an emergency medicine physician at Greater Baltimore Medical Center, says "drink more than your thirst would otherwise dictate -- a good guide is for each hour of being outdoors on a hot, humid day, drink 16 ounces -- double that if you are exerting yourself."
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Autopsy results showing that Morgan State University football player Marquese Meadow died of heat stroke have prompted his mother to question whether coaches and trainers monitored the heat at practice or gave players enough water breaks. Meadow, an 18-year-old freshman from Washington, D.C., died early Sunday after being hospitalized for two weeks. School officials said he became disoriented after an Aug. 10 football practice. His death has been ruled accidental, said Bruce Goldfarb, spokesman for the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner.
NEWS
July 1, 2001
Watch for signs of heat stroke, which is life-threatening and can occur with any outdoor activity in extreme heat. Heat stroke means the body's temperature-control system, which causes perspiration to cool the body, stops working, causing a person's temperature to rise. Brain damage or death can occur. Symptoms: Hot, red and dry skin; changes in consciousness; rapid, weak pulse; and rapid, shallow breathing. What to do: Call 911. Move the person to a cooler place, and make sure he or she is kept lying down.
FEATURES
By Gabe Mirkin, M.D. and Gabe Mirkin, M.D.,United Feature Syndicate | May 31, 1994
The most common time for people to die of heat stroke is in late spring or early summer, when the weather suddenly turns warm. It takes a week of exercising in the heat for your body to acclimate to it. If you try to exercise intensely before your body adjusts to hot weather, you can suffer a heat stroke, which is a sudden uncontrolled rise in body temperature that can cause you to pass out.Your body will give you plenty of warning signs before a heat stroke...
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing Writer United Feature Syndicate | June 22, 1993
When you exercise, your body temperature rises because more than 70 percent of the energy that is used to drive your muscles is lost as heat. If your temperature rises too high, you can suffer from heat stroke and pass out.Spring and early summer are the most common times for heat stroke to occur because your body loses some of its ability to dissipate heat during the winter.In colder weather, your body has little trouble dissipating the extra heat. When warm weather arrives, it takes from four to 14 days of exercising in the heat to protect you fromhaving your temperature rise too high.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | July 17, 2013
Most Marylanders say people in the United States are already being harmed by climate change, a new poll finds. In a statewide mail survey of 2,100 households, the poll by George Mason University's Center for Climate Change Communication found that 52 percent of Marylanders see evidence that climate change is hurting Americans. That's a stronger view than is held by Americans generally, it seems. Only 34 percent of those asked nationwide said they believed climate change was already harming people in this country, according to the pollsters.
SPORTS
Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
The Aug. 10 workout at which Morgan State football player Marquese Meadow fell ill was a one-hour, non-contact session geared toward conditioning, a university spokesman said Wednesday. Meadow, a freshman on the Bears' football team, died Sunday of heat stroke after spending two weeks in the hospital. Morgan State spokesman Clint Coleman reiterated Wednesday that the school believes all proper procedures were followed by the coaching staff and athletic trainers. He said Meadow was attended to by a trainer after becoming disoriented toward the end of the Aug. 10 session, during which players were not in pads.
FEATURES
June 6, 2012
Ah, summer. A time for all sorts of fun activities - hikes, cookouts, pool days, bike rides and more. And ow, summer. A time for all kinds of seasonal injuries and health emergencies. such as burns from the grill, tick bites, heat stroke and swimmers ear. Be prepared with our Summer Survival Guide - we identify nine common summer ailments, explain what they look like and detail how to treat them. Our focus is on how to respond, but doctors note that the best way to enjoy your summer is by practicing prevention: wear sunscreen and bug spray, cover up when hiking in the woods and drink lots of water on hot days.
NEWS
August 12, 2014
Thank you for your insightful editorial on August 5th, advocating for a harm reduction approach to drug use at electronic dance music (EDM) events ( "High risk high," Aug. 5). As the mother of a college student who died of a heat stroke last summer after taking "Molly" as part of her experience at one of these events, I have come to understand more than I ever cared to about this issue. But the death of my daughter has made activism an imperative for me, and I want to see similar tragedies come to an end. Before my daughter, Shelley Goldsmith, died, I had never heard of "harm reduction.
NEWS
July 19, 2013
Thanks for Tim Wheeler 's report that Marylanders understand some of the connections between climate change and human health ("Most Marylanders see climate change harming health," July 17). Last week during a lengthy heat wave, a Massachusetts postman collapsed and died on his route. Many of the local papers covering the story failed to mention climate change as a factor in his death. In fact, outdoor workers are more at risk from extreme heat, and the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration has prepared a guide for companies whose employees "spend a substantial portion of the shift outdoors.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | July 17, 2013
Most Marylanders say people in the United States are already being harmed by climate change, a new poll finds. In a statewide mail survey of 2,100 households, the poll by George Mason University's Center for Climate Change Communication found that 52 percent of Marylanders see evidence that climate change is hurting Americans. That's a stronger view than is held by Americans generally, it seems. Only 34 percent of those asked nationwide said they believed climate change was already harming people in this country, according to the pollsters.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez,
For The Baltimore Sun
| May 24, 2013
My dog loves running in the yard, but I worry in the summer. What signs should I look for that he may be getting overheated, and what should I do if he exhibits them? Early signs of heat stroke include panting, bright pink gums, strong pulses, vomiting, diarrhea or depression. Playing outside in the summer, even in the shade and with access to water, puts dogs at risk for developing heat stroke. Owners must regulate their pups' exposure to heat in the spring (before they have acclimated to the higher temperatures)
NEWS
May 15, 2013
While I applaud Tim Wheeler for shining a light on the risks of climate change in his recent article "Rising temperatures increase health risks" (May 10), I'm saddened by these three esteemed universities investing time and effort into researching what appears to be common sense. Most all of us know intuitively and from experience that extreme heat - whether it results in heat stroke, dehydration, sunburn, other physiological reactions, or just lack of ability to participate actively in daily activities - is not good for us. The more of it we experience as a society, the higher the number of individuals who will be impacted.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2013
Summer is almost here, and with it likely some blistering hot days. A recent study suggests the elderly should beware when the temperature spikes, because they face an increased risk of winding up in the emergency room short of breath on those days. And that's just a taste of what health problems to expect as global climate change cranks the heat up in many places. Researchers for Johns Hopkins, Harvard and Yale universities reviewed a nationwide health database of 12.5 million older Americans on Medicare and found that increases in outdoor temperatures raise the risk for the elderly of being rushed to the hospital with respiratory disorders.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | July 19, 1996
When Republicans war over people disagreeing with a position supporting their nominee, winning is not uppermost ontheir minds.QCInvest in the stock market! Next best thing to bungee jumping.Slick Willy wants Florida Cubans to think he's enforcing the embargo and the rest of the world to think he's not. It's t'other way round.Atlanta promises the Olympic record for heat stroke. Gold medals for survival.Pub Date: 7/19/96
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | July 25, 1995
Hot enough for you? Don't get mad at us; we're as tired of that question as you are.Heat exhaustion and heat stroke are striking people around the country, especially children, the elderly, athletes and people taking certain common medications.If your body were an automobile, you wouldn't get far when the water in your radiator boiled away. Ignore the warning light, and you could easily blow the engine.The body doesn't come with an "idiot light" or a gauge to signal overheating, but overlooking the warning signs of heat exhaustion could lead to a serious medical emergency.
FEATURES
June 6, 2012
Ah, summer. A time for all sorts of fun activities - hikes, cookouts, pool days, bike rides and more. And ow, summer. A time for all kinds of seasonal injuries and health emergencies. such as burns from the grill, tick bites, heat stroke and swimmers ear. Be prepared with our Summer Survival Guide - we identify nine common summer ailments, explain what they look like and detail how to treat them. Our focus is on how to respond, but doctors note that the best way to enjoy your summer is by practicing prevention: wear sunscreen and bug spray, cover up when hiking in the woods and drink lots of water on hot days.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | May 24, 2012
As Memorial Day approaches and the temperatures rise, some state health officials are reminding residents to take care of themselves and their children and neighbors. The state is activating its heat emergency website, dhmh.maryland.gov/extremeheat , which has information about preventing death and illness. Heat advisories will be issued when it feels like it's at least 105 degrees after heat and humidity are factored. Health officials say at this heat level heat stroke and exhaustion are common.
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